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July 14, 1956 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-07-14

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SATURDAY, JULY 14, 1956

THE IMIC.NiGAN DAILY

PAGE TRE

SATURDAY, JULY 14, 1956 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY PAflW~ TRUER

a si Vf a/ i aasasY

p

EARLY PHYSICIANS' ROLE:
Library Exhibits Arabian Medicine Collection

,,

The Medical Library located in
the Kresge - Foundation Research
Center is exhibiting some high-
lights of Arabian Medicine.
David Kronick, divisional librar-
ian, said that this is one of the
many efforts of the Medical
Library to bring to the University
material which is available in the'
immediate area.
Dr. Lufti M. Sa'di, of Detroit, a
Lebanese native, possesses one of
the finest libraries on Arabic
Medicine in this country.
The exhiibt, a part of the doc-
tor's library, is a depiction in
graphic art of the part played by
the Arabian physicians from 750
A.D. to 1400 A.D.
Arabic was the "lingua franca"
of the learned during the Dark
Ages of Medieval Europe indicat-
ing that during the period of time
in which Europe was overrun by
the Goths and Huns, Arabic was
the refined and educated language
of the times.
The period, 750 to 900, is known
as the period of Transition and
Assimilation. During this era
Nestorian scholars explored the
Persian Schools of medicine. Jundi
.Qo7rtranl tP intn Rvria d

MEDICAL RESEARCH
some of Arabic medicine
were brought to Kresge F
David Krondick.
Farmers T
Share of M
By The Associated Press
4 WASHINGTON - The
hower administration ann
yesterday it will give farme
private traders a bigger sh
the wheat export business.
The move followed come
that the administration's
policies were tending
"state monopoly" because
have largely consisted of g
ment-owned surplus wheat
SALINE MIL
THEATRE
U.S. 112-/z mile west of
"THE MOO N
IS BLU
Adm. $1.65 wk nights, $2.2C
"Rollicking" - Ann Arbor

-Daily-Don Watkins
LIBRARY - The exhibition highlights

DIAL NO 2-3136

beteentheyeas 10 t 140 AD. hey ; apur ransaedinw yrac an
between the years 150 to 1400 A.D. They Arabic the works from scientists
oundation library by divisional librarian, of Greece, India, and Persia.
Golden Age
The second phase was the
Golden Age from 900 to 1200. At
the time there was a firm founda-
(Yet B igger tion in the Greek-Persian and
Indian sciences. Moslem physi-
clans produce original works.
heat Export duce original works.
The last period of greatness of
Arabic medicine bears the title
Hereafter, the Aiculture De- Decline and Transition 1200
Eisen- partment said, privately owned through 1400 A.D. With the ex-
lounced ception of work in the fields of
rs and supplies of the grain will be given ophthalmology and materia med-
hare of a much larger share of export ica Arabic Medicine has never
markets. reached any degree of recognition
plaints This action had been proposed since then.
present some time ago by the grain trade __________
toward and came a few hours after the
exports leader of the National Grange had Conference
overn- charged that administration wheat
. export policies were moving toward
"a state monopoly" that threatened 0terature
ruin to the private marketing sys-
tem. "Literature and Composition:
Herschel D Newsom, master of How to Use Them Together," is
the Grange, said in a letter to title of a panel discussion from 4
eL Asst. Secretary of Agriculture to 5 p. m. Monday in the summer
Marvin L. McLain that the govern- series of conferences for English
nient, by pushing its wheat into teachers, "Teaching English Com-
export markets, had become a position, Written and Oral, in the
competitor of farmers and traders. High School."
Saline Discontinues Sale This is fourth in the series, to
In a formal announcement, the be held in Auditorium C, Angell
department said that beginning Hall. .
Sept. 4, it will discontinue sales Panel members will be: Eva
of its wheat to exporters at cut Moore, Royal Oak High School
rate prices for shipment abroad. Elizabeth Pagel from Traverse
E" Exporters will then have to turn City High School and Robert Frei-
to supplies held by farmers and er of Western High School in De-
other private owners. But the de- troit.
o Sat. partment will continue to offer Also in the panel is Prof. A. K.
export subsidies to enable shippers -Stevens of the University English
News to compete with lower prices in department, who is editor of "The
world markets. U.S. prices are be- Newsletter", Michigan Council of
ing supported above world levels Teachers of English. Prof. Stevens
by a farm price support program. will act as chairman of the dis-
The subsidy will be designed to cussion.
. permit exporters to pay the higher There are two more discussions
U.S. domestic prices for privately in the series on July 23 and 30.
owned wheat and sell it abroad All are open to the public.
at lower prices.
The subsidy will be in the form hy
of government-owned surplus . Cou e
wheat rather than in cash, as the
grain trade and Newsom had The University is conducting an
urged. This wheat will be avail- experimental physical education
able for export along with free course which is open to Ann Arbor
market supplies. youngsters.
Run on a two-week basis, the
course is taught by Barbour Gym
4 Iby Joan Whalley of Liverpool,
England.
6588 Jackson Rd. rganization
"FORBI DDEN
PLANET" Notices
and
"GHOST TOWN" Congregational and Disciples Guild:
Picnic outing and vespers, July 15, 2:30
p. i., meet at Guild House 524 Thomp-
son. For reservations, call 'NO 35838 by
Saturday noon.
Episcopal Student Foundation: Pic-
Snic, cars will leave Canterbury House
.V - , at 4:00 p. m., July 15.
Breakfast followed by talk by Dean
4675 Washtenow Deborah Bacon, 9:00 a. m., July 15,
"SLIGHTLY SCARLET" Canterbury House.
and Hillel Foundation: Israeli Folk Danc-
OUTLAW STALLION" ing, July 15, 7:00 p. m. Hillel.
Tisha B'Av Observance, July 16,
Extra Added Attraction: 7:00 p. m., Hilel.
3 stooge comedy International Committee of the Lea-
gue. The following women have been
° _ _ _ _ chosen as American Friends for the
fall of 1956: Claire Bellows, Nancy
Ball, Nancy Calkins, Irene Dobb, Doro-
thy Huntwork, Leona Junko, Edith
Slosson, Rosemary Warnemuende. There
-i will be a meeting in the League for
- these women on Wednesday evening,
!l rJuly 18 at 7:45 p m. Please call
4. 3 7NO 3402$ if not able to attend.
__ I TONIGI
\~4,,Department of
'' W. Somerset Ma
"THE C
Follow the lead of the
ones who knowgood food! $1.50-$
The Golden Apples Room LYDIA MENDEL

is the destination of all

t
"s
i'
f

-Daily-Don Watkins
MEDICAL BOOKS-The illuminated manuscripts of Arabic and,
Moslem background from the extensive library of Dr. Sa'di of'
Detroit are on loan exhibition at the Medical Research Library.

A-Proposal
Plan Unsafe
At Monroe
WASHINGTON (M)--Sen. Clin-
ton Anderson (D-N.M.) said yes-
terday the Atomic Energy Commis-
sion's Reactor Safeguard Com-
mittee has put an "unsafe" label
on a private combine's plan for an
atomic power plant at Monroe,
Mich.
Ground-breaking for the plant
is scheduled for Aug. 8. Sen. An-
derson told a reporter he has been
trying, so far without success, to
get AEC to make public its safety
committee's report. Sen. Anderson
said he might release the report
himself.
He said he also might take the
matter up with Gov. G. Mennen
Williams. The Governor, he said,
has certain "responsibilities" in the
situation.
No Public Hazard
Thomas E. Murray, AEC mem-
ber, was reported to have said
the reactor safeguard committee
had found "There is insufficient
information available at this time
to give assurance that the (Mon-
roe) reactor can be operated at
this site without public hazard."
Sen. Anderson, chairman of the
Senate-House Joint Committee on
Atomic Energy, has questioned
whether there might be a "conflict
of interest" between Walker Cis-
ler's duties as head of the combine
and as the government's "official
power consultant" abroad.
Cisler is president of the Detroit
Edison Co. and head of the Power
Reactor Development Co., which
was formed by 44 utility and man-
ufacturing companies to build a
100,000 kilowatt, fast-breeder nu-
clear reactor at Monroe.
Cisler also is chief power con-
sultant to the International Co-
operation Administration (ICA)
and represents ICA, AEC and the
State Department in the organi-
zation for European Economic Co-
operation. One of his jobs is to
inform the government of atomic
power progress abroad.
Released Testimony
The Joint Committee has re-
leased testimony at a closed hear-
ing June 28 during which Sen.
Anderson asked AEC Chairman
Lewis L. Strauss:
"Do you think ... there is any
possibility of what is called a con-
flict of interest by having Mr.
Cisler, who is in the power busi-
ness in the United States and is
vitally interested in whether or
not that power develops abroad,
be the official power consultant to
ICA?"
Strauss replied he knew "too
little about the situation" to com-
ment. He said he had not known
that Cisler held the ICA post.

CLASSIFIEDS

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
FOR SALE
FOR SALE -- 1953 Lambretta Motor
Scooter. Reasonably good condition.
More than 100 miles per gallon. $190.
NO 5-5585. )
1951 Studebaker, inexpensive transpor-
tation, Radio and heater. $90. NO-5-
4361. )B
1951 HOUSE TRAILER-3-rooms, Kit-
chen, Living and Bedrooms. Com-
pletely furnished, 30 ft. 2 bottle gas
tanks, heated with fuel oil 2Very good
condition. $2,500 cash, NO-2-9020. )B
HOME in southeast section. 4 large
bedrooms, living room, dining room,
and breakfast room. Fine basement
with recreation, room. Abundance of
closet and storage space, gas-heater.
Attached garage. Drapes and carpet-
ing included. Priced at $27,900, with
liberal terms. Call NO-3-0123 or NO-
3-4300. )B
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS APARTMENTS, 3 and 4 Adults
3 and 4 Rooms, nicely decorated and
furnished. Private bath. Call NO 2-
0035 or 8-6205, or 3-4594. )D
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Glasses in red straw case, near
E. Med. Phone Porter, NO 3-2405 )A
LOST-Diamond ring in Virginian Res-
taurant. Sentimental value. Reward.
Phone NO-2-0379. )A

SIAMESE CAT Stud Service. Registered.
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. )J
FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM with board and garage
privileges for gentlemen. Also a suite
for two. Call NO 8-7230. )d

I I

PERSONAL
HILLSDALE GRADS. Reunion no
Wednesday 18th. 8. Entrance Nn
Elementary School.
SITUATION WANTED
SECOND World War Veteran wants p
manent night janitor work. Reliat
NO-2-9020.
HELP WANTED
SECRETARY--To assist in psycholo
cal work in Detroit. $70 a week. T
ing required. Some college experier
essential. Call NO 2-5742 evenings.
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING-Theses, term papers, e
Reasonable rates, prompt service.1
South Main, NO 8-7590.
GRADUATE EXCHANON S T U DII
from Paris studying linguistics. Wi
es to tutor French. Call NO-3-1416.
WASHINGS, finished work, ironing &
aratelyi Specialize on cotton dres
blouses, wash skirts. Free pick-up a
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020.

Gibbs, Great Botanist,
Plus Great Interviewee

Read
Daily
Classifieds

}
N
1

by Betty Goss
iversity class of '25, his master's
Professor R. Darnley Gibbs of in science from McGill in '26.
McGill University, Montreal, Can- A greying man, small in stature,
ada, is a great man who does not the intellectual is not muted, nor
let one down upon 'interveiwing is his humanism. Though a dem-
and meeting. onstrator in botany at McGill in
That the professor is among the '25 to '26 and '27 to '29, the pro-
greats in botany, physiology in fessor uses slides of flowers taken
trees, comparative chemistry of in his mother's garden in England.
plants in relation to the prob- During the course of lecturing,
lems of taxonomy, is to state a Prof. Gibbs uses the vernacular,
bald fact. the language of the man in street,
Meeting the man, however, is to or the dirt gardener with the same
have these erudite, ivory tower ease he demonstrated in delivering
honors come alive. To hear his the learned terminology in the
British voice enunciating the physical sciences.
Queen's English, is to hear a mas- Life, a Challenge
t'er of the spoken word. His French Christened Roland, Prof. . R.
is equally fine because Prof. Gibbs Darnley Gibbs causes one to be-
was born on the Isle of Wight. lieve that he, like his patron,
Proud Man finds life a continuing challenge.
During the years '26 and '27 when
He, like all other natives of the he was away from McGill, Prof.
Isle of Wight (one of the famed Gibbs served as bi-chemist for
channel islands), is a proud man, the American Rubber interests.
proud of his channel birth and the Today, the graciousness, the
history of his native Isle. simplicity and charm plus in-
Prof. Gibbs' title is one of philos- creased erudition are only the
ophy. He acquired his bachelor's more marked. Prof. Gibbs is a
degree in science from London Un- Fellow of the Royal Academy of
Canada, a member of the Botani-
* cal Society, the Society for Plant
LansngIz'Ollce Physiology, and committeeman on
Tree Physiology.
Gets Evidence To hear Dr. Gibbs is to become
enthused with the natural sciences,
F o 1 a desire only to get out a small kit
F 'rom iock bag and set forth on a field expedi-
tion searching for speciman to
LANSING (P) - In a surprise analyze and assist in the reclassi-
move yesterday, Alderman Robert fication of life.
Klock, who had charged that theCo s
Lansing Police Department "cov- Coeds Courses
ered up" widespread gambling in
the city, turned his alleged evi- Women's Athletic department
dence over to Lansing police, will offer brushup courses in golf,
Ingham County Prosecutor tennis and swimming during the
Charles Chamberlain had de- next two weeks.
manded that Klock give him any Brushup sessions in golf are be-
evidence he had of gambling and ing given Tuesday for irons and
corruption but Klock and Cham- Thursday for woods at 7 p. m. at
berlain have been conducting a the Women's Athletic Building.
"You said this"--"No I didn't" Clubs and balls will be furnished.
kind of quarrel. Entries for the woman's singles
The Lansing Board of Police summer session tennis tournament
and Fire Commissioners, which will close Tuesday.
heard Klock make his charges, Special' brushup sessions in
had asked Chamberlain to call a swimming will be held at 7:30 p.
Grand Jury if he found any evi- m. Monday for those interested in
dence of wrong-doing. springboard and elementary div-
Klock, meanwhile, said he had ing and at 7:30 p. m. July 23 for
made no accusations of graft and those interested in all swimming
corruption against anyone in the strokes. Sessions will be held in
Police Department, the Women's pool.
Chamberlain declared Klock said There is recreational swimming
he had "reason to believe" police at the Women's pool.
protection of gambling existed._ __ _
Capt. Edward C. Johnston, of the
State Police Rackets Squad, also
said Klock mentioned he had
suspicions of police protection of
gambling.
At thespolice board meeting, (AND EVERY NIl
Klock hesitated when asked why
he went to State Police instead of
Lansing Police with his gambling
information.
"You think somebody's getting
some money, don't you?" asked 31AU
Police Chief Paul Taylor.
Klock nodded his head and an-
swered "that's right."
-IT at 8BO And EV M
HT of 8 sToP
Speech PresentsBAtew .rk
ugham's Comedy
ugham Comdy Iwhen Hope-ful
l c- hick Eva Mri
1RCLE" Avenue trails
give you a milli
.10-75c Param
SOHN THEATRE

t
t
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C Saturday at7 and 9:20
"HENR 't
LAURENCE with
-,AURENCE OLIVIER ROBERT NEWTON
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50c

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