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July 14, 1956 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-07-14

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FOUR

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;AVCKDAV, JULY 14,19;16

FOUR mE ±~iM.Uk4Az~ bAil A SA~AWAI,~ JULY 14, 19~

Phis Drop
Yanks Wallop,.Tribe, 10-0;
Senators Out-Slug Tigers
By The Associated Press
CINCINTI-As iladrelpas a two-hitter and Bill Skowron
CINCINNATI - Philadelphia's batted in four runs with a single
Phillies hit two homers and nine and a home run as the New York
other hits last night, defeating Yankees walloped the Cleveland
Cincinnati's Redlegs, 6-4, and Indians, 10-0, last night.
knocking the Reds out of the It was the seventh straight suc-
National League lead. cess for the Bombers and hiked
The Reds got seven hits off Curt their American League lead to
Simmons who went the distance eight and a half games.
for the Phils. * * *
* * Senators 12, Tigers 11
Yanks 10, Indians 0 WASHINGTON - Washington
NEW YORK-Tom Sturdivant splurged for five runs in the eighth
breezed to his eighth victory with inning to match Detroit's five runs
in the same frame and edged the
Tigers; 12-11.
The victory in a wild game snap-
ped the Senators' five-game losing
streak. Connie Grob, who threw,
only one ball in retiring Bill Tut-
tle on an attempted steal of home,
emerged the winner among seven1
Washington pitchers.{
* * *

Re dlegs

rom National League Lead
SPORTS HIGHLIGHTS IN BRIEF:
Johnson Takes Lead at Start of Decathalon Tryouts

W

I

TOM STURDIVANT
. Yanks' latest Indian-killer

ERNIE BANKS
... matches durability mark

IN THREE RACES:
Bettors Favor Swaps,
Nashua, Fabius Today

CURT
* * trips:

SIMMONS
front-runners

Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

W
New York ........54
Chicago........,4
Cleveland ..,.. 44
Boston ..........42
Detroit ...........35
Baltimore ........34
Washington .....32
Kansas City ...t..29

L
26
32
33
35
43
44
51
49,

Pet
.675
.573
.571
.545
.449
.436
.386
.372

GB
814z
10%
18
19
231/
24

Red Sox 5, White Sox 4
BOSTON-Jim Piersall proved
the man of the moment for the
second time in as many games
yesterday when he drove home the
winning run as the Boston Red
Sox whipped the Chicago White
Sox, 5-4.
Piersall's game-winning hit, a
Texas Leaguer into right, capped
a two-run rally after two were
out in the eighth inning.
* * *
Cards 7, Giants 5
ST. LOUIS-Alvin Dark doubled
across the deciding runs with his
fourth straight hit of the game
and gave the St. Louis Cardinals
a 7x5 verdict over the New York
Giants, his erstwhile teammates.
* * *
Cubs 7, Pirates 6
C H I C A G O-Shortstop Ernie
Banks tied a major league rec-,
ord by playing his 394th consecu-
tive game since breaking in as a
rookie in 1953 and used a seventh-
inning single to power the Chicago
Cubs to a 7-6 win:over Pittsburgh.
Banks' first-pitch single off Bob
Friend scored tripling Dee Fondy
with the winning run.
* *
A's 3,,Orioles 2
BALTIMORE-Lou Skizas
homered with a teammate aboard
to provide Alex Kellner with his
seventh victory of the year as the
Kansas City Athletics edged out
Baltimore, 3-2.
* , *.
Braves 8, Dodgers 6
MILWAUKEE--The Milwaukee
Braves blasted Don Newcombe for
six runs in the first inning last
night but had to score twice more
in the late innings to defeat the
Brooklyn Dodgers, 8-6, in the first
game of a twi-night doubleheader.

By The Associated Press
INGLEWOOD, Calif.-- Swaps,
who has broken three world rec-
ords and tied another this year,
will face six challengers in the
$100,000 Hollywood Gold Cup Han-'
dicap today.
Swaps now holds world marks
for a mile, a mile and 70 yards,
a mile and one-sixteenth and is
co-holder at a mile and one-
eighth.
The Gold Cup with its guar-
anteed $100,000 net to the winner,
is his first run at a mile and one-
quarter this year, a classic dis-
tance where the record is 1:531vs.
* *
Nashua at Monmouth
OCEANPORT, N.J.-Millionaire
Nashua and eight others were en-
tered for the $100,000-added Mon-
mouth Park Handicap today and
it should be like taking candy away
from babies for the colorful syndi-
cate galloper.
The world's richest horse has
top weight of 129 for the mile and
one-quarter spin, He must con-
cede chunks of weight to all of
his opponents. But if "Mr. Mil-
lions" runs like he did while win-
ning the Suburban Handicap July
4 it should be a gilt-edged joyride
for Sunny Jim Fitzsimmons, Ed-
die Arcaro, and company.,
* * *
Fabius at Arlington
CHICAGO -Preakness winner
Fabius, with America's hottest
jockey astride, is favored to con-
quer seven-or possibly, eight-
rivals in Saturday's $100,000 added
Arlington Classic,

By The Associated Press
CRAWFORDSVILLE, I n d. -
Rafer Lewis Johnson, UCLA giant
who already holds the world de-
cathlon record, piled up another
world record total of 4,639 points
last night for the first half of
the AAU National Decathlon
which will determine the three
U.S. Olympic decathlon contend-
ers.
In spite of humid air and an oc-
casional sprinkle, Johnson closed
the first session of the two-day
meet with a 400-meter dash in
47.9 seconds butonly tied Notre
Dame halfback Aubrey Lewis for
the best time ever made at the
distance in decathlon competition.
The old record was 48.3 made in
1953.
The 6' 2%" Johnson, a 200-
pound wedge of muscles, had a
98-point bulge over his first-half
total in his 7,983 world record de-
cathlon of last year.
He won the 100-meter dash Fri-
day in 10.6 seconds, good for 1,080
points, and the broad jump at 23'-
21", good for 808 points. He
turned in the best shot put of his
career at 49' 8%" for 894 points,
but Sam Adams, former Univer-
sjity of California track captain,
won the event at 53' ".
Johnson got 1,025 points for
his 400-meter run and 832 for
going 6' 1" in the high jump.
Only One Tennis Upset
INDIANAPOLIS-All s e e d e d
players except Janet Hopps of
Seattle, the top-rated woman, won
their quarter-finals yesterday in
the Western tennis championships.
Miss Hopps was beaten in
straight sets by Yola Ramirez of
Mexcio City, 6-3, 6-2.
Vic Seixas of Philadelphia, top-
seeded in men's singles, defeated
Reynoldo Garrido of Miami, 6-2,
6-1. Second-seeded Bernard Bart-
zen of San Angelo, Tex., the de-

The Calumet Farm ace will be
piloted in the rich mile chase for
three-year-olds by Bill Hartaqk,
the riding sensation of the current
Arlington Park season,
Poor Risk
CHICAGO (M)-In the fourth
race at Arlington Park yester-
day, So Bet Me, ridden by
Jockey Robert Lee Baird, failed
any bettors whom his tantaliz-
ing name may have induced to
wager.
The horse, running with the
pack with about one furlong
remaining in the seven-furlong
race, dropped dead. It suffered
a heart attack, track veterinari-
ans said.

Sunday

fending champion, beat Churck
DeVoe of Indianapolis, 6-2, 6-4.
Eddie Moylan of Trenton, N.J.,
seeded number three, defeated Ar-
mando Vieria of Brazil, 6-3, 6-3.
Alex Olmedo of Arquipa, Peru,
beat Bill Quillian of Seattle, 6-4,
6-3.
Karol Fageros of Miami, second-
seeded woman, defeated Patricia
Naud of San Francisco, 6-3, 11-9.
Third-ranked Barbara Green of
Los Angeles defeated Pat Shaffer
of Tampa, Fla., 6-4, 6-3. Mary Ann
Mitchell of San Leandro, Calif.,
No. 4, defeated Nancy O'Connell
of Chicago, 7-1, 6-3.

Operate on Miss Zaharias
GALVESTON, Tex.-Mrs. Babe
Zaharias, famed woman athlete,
underwent a four-hour opperation
yesterday to ease the pain in her
fight against cancer.
Physicians said the operation, a
cordotomy, was one to surgically
divide the nerve track which car-

1 1

ries the sensation of pain to the
lower extremities.
Lightburn Upset
NEW YORK-Orlando Zulueta,
a 3 to 1 underdog, used a flicking
left jab to pile up points for a
surprise unanimous decision over
Ludwig Llghtburn of British Hon-
duras in a 10-round match last
night at Madison Square Garden.

TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Washington
Kansas City at Baltimore,
Cleveland at New York
Chicago at Boston
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet GB
*Milwaukee .......43 30 .589 14
Cincinnati ........44 32 .579 ?r
*Brooklyn ........42 34 .553 2Y2
St. Louis ........39 39 .500 6%
Pittsburgh .......37 38 .493 7
Philadelphia ...34 43 .442 11x
Chicago ..........32 42 .432 11%
New York ........30 43 All 13
*---second game of double-header
not included.
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Cincinnati
Brooklyn at Milwaukee
Pittsburgh at Chicago (2)
New York at St. Louis

Wertz-Skowron Collision
Creates Major Controversy.

IL

a'

Come

to Church

California Governor Pomises To Suppor
Any Moves to Dissolve Coast Conference

NEW YORK OP)-Did the 195-'
pound Bill Skowron throw a foot-
ball block at Cleveland's Vic
Wertz in their now celebrated first
base collision Thursday at Yankee
Stadium?
It was an "illegal contact," said
Hal Lebovitz, baseball writer of
the Cleveland News. "In football
it would have been a 15-yard pen-
alty."
"Just an accident," said Skow-
ron, the Yankees' muscled first
baseman, a former gridder at Pur-
due University. "I was running
clearly within the base path-I
never touched the grass."
"Skowron was running inside
the line a bit, but we're notmad
at anybody-we've got no gripes."
added Manager Al Lopez of the
Indians.
"I can't say whether Bill was off
the line or not, but I know he does
run inside a lot," said Wertz, the
pained victim, a good-sized man
himself at six feet and 186 pounds.
"But II won't say he did it pur-
posely."
The play occured in the fifth

inning of the New York-Cleveland
game at the stadium, won by the
Yankees, 9-3.
Skowron stayed in the game, his
right leg in pain but not seriously
hurt. Wertz went out with a
bruised left hip and a groin in'-
jury.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. A--Gov.
Goodwin J. Knight said yesterday
he would lend his "hearty support"
to any ove to dissolve the Pa-
cific Coatt Conference and set up
an athletic league for California
universities.
But the governor, voicing indig-
nation at recent PCC fine sand
player suspension levied on UCLA,
California, USC and Washington,
said he himself had- no power to
form such a statewide conference.
Knight Gets Support
In Los Angeles, Gov. Knight got
support in a measure from Chan-
cellor Raymond B. Allen of UCLA.
Said Allen:
"Apparently many people are of
the same mind as Gov. Knight re-
garding the formation of a new
athletic conference of the four ma-
jor California universities.
"It seems to me that unless the
PCC presidents can quickly staba-
lize the athletic situation in such
a manner as to re-establish pub-
lie confidence, the governor's sug-
gestion may well become U real-

from the conference. I see noth-
ing wrong with the conference the
way it is . . ."
"Knight, one-time rugby foot-
baller at Stanford, told newsmen
the major fault with the PCC lies
with the rule prohibiting a Rose
Bowl pact if the Big Ten insists
on the "medieval" no-repeat
clause.
Unrealistic Ceiling
And he noted the $75-a-month
aid to athletes ceiling imposed by
the PCC was unrealistic to many
people. The $75 top, he said, mere-
ly invited violations.
The governor chastized confer-
ence leaders for levying the fines
and suspensions on practically a

two-at-a-time basis. "Pretty soon,"
he said, "everybody was blowing
the whistle on everyone else."
Four Schools Charged
UCLA, California, USC a n d
Washington have been charged
by the conference faculty repre-
sentatives with paying more than
the $75 monthly stipend to grid-
ders.
The. governor first started the
PCC disbanding talk in a letter to
Ned Cronin, Los Angeles Times
sports writer.
He suggested in the letter that
UCLA, California, Stanford and
Southern California join up in an
all-California league.

11

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 6:30 A.M., 7:00 AM., 8:00 A.M.,
9:00 A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings -- 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays--1:00 to 1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
William B. Hutchinson, Eugene A. Ransom
Ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship, sermon "A Lost
Gospel?" by Rev. William Hutchinson
9:30 A.M. Discussion group topic: "Problems of
Christian Belief.",
2:00 P.M. Meet in Wesley lounge for a picnic out-
ing.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian R'.formed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res, Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service.
7.00 Evening Service.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C Bennett, Pastor.
11:00 A.M. "The Ambition To Be Quiet."
7:00 P.M. The Virtue of Hospitality.
7:30 P. M. Wednesday-Prayer Meeting.
We Welcome You.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.
Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Sunday Morning Worship at 9:15 and 11:00 A.M.
Summer Fellowship for Students and Young Adults,
meet at 2:30 for outing to one of the lakes.
Patricia Pickett will be in the student office 12-
2 P.M., Monday through Thursday.
Bible Study, "The Apostle Paul." Wednesday, July
18th, at 8 o'clock.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & South Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:30 A.M. Bible Study on Galatians.
10:30 A.M. Worship Service.
6:00 P.M. Supper.
7:00 P.M. Program-Rev. Malcolm Ballinger,
Chaplain at University Hospital, Speaker.
Tuesday-7:30 P.M. Class-Teachings of Denom-
inations.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
and STUDENT CENTER

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion at St. Andrew
Church (Followed by breakfast and speaker at
Canterbury House).
9:00 A.M. Family Service.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4:00 P.M. Picnic. Cars leave from Canterbury
House.
8:00 P.M. Evening, Prayer and Commentary
(chapel).
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur Zillgitt, Asst. Pastor.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Sermon--"What Is
Your Motive In Serving God?"
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10:45 A.M.-Meeting for Worship.
9:3 A.M.-Child care.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A. M. Church School Classes: Nursery to
6th Grade.
10:45 A.M. Public Worship. Rev. H. L. Pickerill
will preach on the subject "Creative Fellow-
ship."
2:30 P.M. Student Guild meets at the Guild
House, 524 Thompson. Outing includes swim-
ming, picnic supper, and Vespers.
Tuesday: 4:30-6:00 P.M., Informal mid-week Tea
at the Guild House.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron,
Chester H. Loucks and Duane L. Day, Min-
isters. Student Advisor: Beth Mahone.
10:00 A.M. Student Bible Study.
11:00 A.M. V. Benjamin of India will be the guest
speaker.
2:00 P.M. Roger Williams Guild will meet in the
Guild House to go together to Silver Lake for their
program, a swim and a picnic supper.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister.
Sunday 8:00 P.M.-Donald Pelz, Director of Ann
Arbor Sales Survey, will talk. Subject: "Prog-
ress Report on Self Survey."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Sunday, 11 A.M.
Wednesday, 8 P.M., Testimony Meetinr.
Sunday School, 9:30 A.M.
Reading Room, 339 South Main.
Tuesday to Saturday, 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Monday,
11 A.M. to 9 P.M.; Sunday, 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.

I I

A

i

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IL

I

I

o lonesom eleftovers
when
you
buy ~
our
SLETTER P4PERS
Why send out mis-matched
letters (they make a poor
impression), when you can
always match paper and

NJ

I

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Bob.
Marshall's

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets.
Rev, Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Guest speaker: Mr. Mar-
vin Jewell: LAZARUS, COME FORTH.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
THE CONGREGATIONAL and DISCIPLES STU

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