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August 10, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-08-10

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 1956

T MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TBREL

FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 1956 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE ~EX

Dental Research Team
Developing 'Tooth Bank'

4 A University dental research
team is hard at work on a project
which they hope will lead to the
effective transplantation of live
human teeth, and the successful
storage of live teeth in "tooth
banks."
If their research is successful, it
could eventually lead in certain
cases to elimination of the use of
artificial replacements for teeth
that are lost from decay or acci-
dent. It would give the people of
Michigan the opportunity to re-
' piace lost teeth with normal, living
teeth Preservation of more natu-
ral teeth by transplantation would
promote the general good health
of the bone and soft tissues which
support the teeth.
According to Dr. James K. Avery,
assistant professor of Dentistry
and project director, "We know it
is possible to transplant teeth in
humans. It has been done success-
fully in selected cases of young
adults by the other members of
our team, Drs. James R. Hayward
and Emmett R. Costich, of the oral
surgery department."
Voice Conference
The sixteenth annual Emer-
gent Voice Conference opens at
Waldenwoods, Hartland, Michi-
gan, August 14 and will close
with a public concert in Cromaine
Hall at 3 p.m., August 26.
Another set of dates, as reported
in the Daily, were in error.

"There are problems to be ironed
out, however," he says, adding that
in order to do tiis, "Individuals
coming to the clinic who could
utilize transplanted teeth are ask-
ed if they would like to partici-
pate. Those who accept are studied
very carefully before a transplant
is made, and their progress follow-
ing the transplant is followed
closely."
So far, transplants have only
been made where a first molar is
missing. The individual's own
third molar-or wisdom tooth-is
used.
"As our knowledge of the
mechanics of transplantation is not
complete at the present time,"
says Dr. Avery, "not all of the
transplants have been successful.
The patient loses nothing in such
a situation, however, as he would
have to have had a bridge, even
hae he had not participated in the
study." He also gets his wisdom
tooth removed.
The transplantation of teeth is
only one part of the project, which
is being financed by an $8,000 re-
search grant from the State Legis-
lature. While the details and prob-
lems found in transplantation are
being worked out by the oral sur-
gery department, Dr. Avery is
directing a laboratory staff in the
search for an effective method of
storing and preserving teeth.
They hope to find this, using
hamsters and an educated trial
and error system. The hamster-a
small, furry rodent--is a very sat-
isfactory animal to experiment
with because his molars are very
similar, except in size, to human
molars.
"Every known process of biologi-
cal preservation will be tried," says
Dr. Avery, "from growing teeth in
test tubes to freezing them. It
will be of interest to attempt to
store teeth after irradiation, a
method currently being used to
preserve bone for grafts."
If a successful means of storage
can be accomplished and the me-
chanical problems found in trans-
planting teeth can be worked out,
collections of teeth. in "tooth
banks" would be started, says Dr.
Avery. He adds that by using
these banks, any prematurely lost
children's or adult's teeth could be
"quickly and efficiently cared for."

Commission
Charges
Study Block
DETROIT (A-A member of a
governor's commission to study
hospital and medical care plans'
in Michigan charged today that
the Michigan State Medical So-
ciety and Blue Cross are trying to
block the study.
The charge came from Leonard
Woodcock, United Auto Workers
Vive President, in a letter to Gov.
Williams and George E. Bowles,
chairman of the study commission.
Woodcock, also a member of the
commission, contended there was
evidence that William S. McNary,
Executive Director of Blue Cross,
and Dr. D. Bruce Wiley, Chairman
of the Council of the State Medical
Society, had made "efforts to
block a sulccessful study."
Woodcock expressed regret at
the resignation of Dr. S. J. Axel-
rod, assistant director of the
Bureau of Public Health Econom-
ics at the University of Michigan,
as research director for the study
commission.
But, he added, "the important
issue facing the commission is not
the resignation but what prompted
it." He referred to "a letter from
Mr. McNary requesting that other
schools of the University be
brought in" and "a letter from Dr.
Wiley making wild and unsub-
stantiated charges against Dr.
Sinai and Dr. Axelrod."
Student Editors
Attend Workshop
Thirty-five high school student
publication editors from four Mid-
western states this week are at-
tending Workshop Conferences for
high school editors at the Univer-
sity Department of Journalism.
The last of the three 12-day
sessions to be held this summer
opened Monday. The workshop,
now in its fourth year, is an in-
tensive course for students work-
ing on high school newspapers,
and yearbooks.
Instruction is given by members
of the University's journalism staff
and two high school advisors.
During each session, the .group
plans, writes, and publishes a
newspaper and completes a year-
book dummy.

MICHIGAN ALUMNUS:
Poker Game Subject
Of Reimann Article

It isn't often that the stake in
a poker game is a county court-
house but it happened once in
Michigan, Lewis C. Reimann writes
in the current issue of "The Michi-
gan Alumnus Quarterly Review."
What at the beginning appeared
to be a harmless contest between
card sharks ni a pioneer com-
munity ended up with the intended
victims holding their guests' money
and the visitors winning a court-
house and the county seat too.
Reimann, who hails from the
north country, says that back in
the early lumbering days Iron
River and Crystal. Falls were in-
fant lumbering and mining towns
of about the same size. Intense
rivalry had sprung up between
them.
A Great Driver
Solos at Ten
KANSAS CI'Y (P)-Gary Dean
Carter took his 8-year-old sister,
Brenda June, out for a spin in
Uncle Jimmy's car yesterday.
They made out all right for a
time, considering that Gary is only
10, almost too short to see over the
wheel and had never soloed before.
In fact, all he knows about driv-
ing he picked up from watching
grownups.
He almost made it into traffic-
dense downtown Kansas City. A
passing motorist spotted the di-
minutive driver, gave chase and
stopped him.
Gary said it was Brenda who
suggested they get "Uncle Jim-
my's car," for a trip to her girl
friend. Uncle Jimmy, at thetime,
was taking a nap. The children
got his keys from the bedroom.
"I didn't want to go," Gary told
police, "but she kept on naggin'
till I gave in."
Gary was a careful driver
though. He said he halted at every
stop sign on the six mile trip.
The child1ren live with their
mother and stepfather. The uncle
James Mauldin, lives in the same
apartment building.
"Gary," said Uncle Jimmy, "will
be eating his meals standing up
for a long time."

It seems the government records
were housed in Iron River in a.
small frame building which served
as the meeting place for the coun-
ty officials.
CrystalFalls was rankled by the
legislature's choice of Iron River
for the county seat, so the politi-
cians of that town hatched a plot
to stage a poker game as a blind
to pilfering the records.
The Iron River gamblers fell for
the trap and soon the click of
poker chips accompanied the clink
of whisky glasses. Throughwthe
haze of cigar smoke the whole
village of Iron River gathered to
watch the red-hot game.
With the Crystal Falls intriguers
were Frank Scadden, newspaper
publisher, and Burt Hughitt, a
lumberman. These two, Reimann
states, had been elected to sneak
off during the game to the tempo-
rary courthouse and steal the re-
cords.
The back door of the "court-
house" had been left unlocked, as
had the safe, so the men quickly;
packed the books on a hand sled
and headed for the railroad depot.
They bribed the conductor, a Crys-
tal Falls man, to allow them to
ride in the caboose and stow the
records and sled under a seat,
Upon reaching Stager, the pair
got off the train, loaded their.
booty onto the hand sled again
and set off for Crystal Falls, five
miles away. There the sheriff
placed the books in a jail cell and
set a guard over them.
When the theft was discovered
bythe county clerk in Iron River,
a mass nieeting was held. But the
angry citizens ran up against a
vigilante committee which had set
up a barricade in front of the jail
where the books were cached.
Furniture Course
To Be Held Here
The fifth annual course in
"Trouble Shooting in the Wood-
Furniture Industry" will be held
at the University August 13
through 18.
Sponsored by the Department of
Wood Technology, the course is
designed to help firms save money
by minimizing costly reworking
and rejection of parts.
With enrollment limited to 18,
the course will include lectures,
demonstrations centered around
production rejects, and laboratory
practice in wood properties, lumber
drying, gluing, machining, and fin-
ishing as they relate to mis-manu-
factured parts.

CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
GIBSON L-5 GUITAR, Concert Model.
No pickup. Ben Alexander, 26 Wen-
ley W. Q. B-
HEADING WEST. Selling 6' x 7' King-
size bed $60; Boys topcoat $10; foot-
ball shoes $5; ice skates $2; double-
size baby layette $10; 8-.cup percula-
tor $5; ironing board $7. Call NO
2-8844 after 6:00. B
TRIUMPH MOTORCYCLE. 1952 Thun-
derbird. Excellent condition $375.
Call NO 3-1408.
1951 HOUSE TRAILER-3-rooms, Kit-
chen, Living and Bedrooms. Com-
pletely furnished, 30 ft. 2 bottle gas
tanks, heated with fuel oil. Very good
condition. $1,800 cash, NO-2-9020. )B
USED CARS
DODGE 1950, excellent condition, ra-
dio, heater, engine completely over-
hauled, new brakes-must sell. Call
Michigan Union (dining hall) NO
2-4431 between 6:00 & 8:00 p.m. Ask
for Peter Schlitt. )N
1941 CHRYSLER CONVERTIBLE, me-
chanically strong. Best offer, Call NO
3-8460. )N
BUSINESS SERVICMS
TYPING - Theses, term papers etc.
Reasonable rates, prompt service. 830
So, Main. NO 8-7590.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST, Forest and North U. 4 month
old Siamese Sealpoint kitten. Reward.
Call NO 8-8996 evenings. A

ROOMS FOR RENT
GRADUATE STUDENT wishes to sh re
apartment with one or two men.
$45 each. Call Myron Braunstein,
-10 P.M. NO 2-4401, ext. Michigan
309. D
WANTED TO RENT
6 to 10 FOREIGN STUDENTS wish to
rent a house near campus on quasi-
permanent basis. Reply Box SL-3
Michigan Daily. L
SITUATION WANTED
SECOND World War Veteran wants per-
manent night janitor or night watch-
man work. Reliable. NO-2-9020. )S
BUSINESS SERVICES
EXPERIENCED TYPIST idi disserta-
tion, term papers, etc. All work done
on electric typewriter. Rh. NO. 2-7605.
)J
WASHINGS, finished work, ironing sep-
arately! Specialize on cotton dresses,
blouses, wash skirts. Free pick-up and
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. )J
SIAMESE CAT Stud Service. Registered.
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. )J
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
4-ROOM FURNISHED apartment, two
bedrooms and bath, 1223 S. State.
Available now. Accommodates four
adults. No drinking. Utilities, garage.
Dial 3TP Ypsilanti 3-Q45xm. )S

9
"My wile ran off
with the
chaulleur."
You can
lind a new
cihaulleur with a
Daily Want Ad.

3 ROOM furnished apartment behind
Rackham Bld. Sublet August 20th -
February. $80. NO 3-6917 evenings or

U

MM

fill
DRIVf"1N .74eatrc

DIAL NO 2-3136
TH ATT;ECRY

6588 Jackson Rd.
"DAY OF FURY"
Dale Robertson

"GOODBYE MY LADY"
Walter Brennan
TYPEWRITERS
Office & Portable Modems
of all makes
Sold - Bought
Repaired - Rented
Stationery & Supplies

0 1Er PING CAEEr~
Q the most popular
Oriental eating place in town
GENUINE CANTONESE STYLE FOOD
also5 ..AMERICAN STYLE
i ORDERS TO) TAKE OUT
FREE PARKING ACROSS THE STREET
118 WEST LIBERTY
c~ Open I1 A.M. to 12 P.M.-Closed Mondays
cat croc t 3~ ce te: tc "c

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

MORRILLS
314 S. State St.

I' 1

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(Continued from, Page 2)
Council Room, Rackham Bldg. at 9:00
a.m. Chairman, A. L. Bader.
Doctoral Examination for George
Baugh Spence, Physics; thesis: "An
Investigation in the Zone Theory of
the Energy of Electrons in Metals",
Fri., Aug. 10, 2038 Randall Laboratory,
at 3:30 p.m. Chairman, Ernst Katz.
Doctoral Examination for Otto Mar-
tin Riedl, Social Psychology; thesis:
"Rationality in the Determination of
the Socio-Economic Attitudes of a
Demographically Homogeneous Group
of Semi-Skilled and Unskliled Manual
Workers", Fri., Aug. 10, 7611 Haven Hall
at 1:00 p.m. Chairman, Daniel Katz.
Doctoral Examination for Albert Cor-
nelius Giebler, Musicology; thesis: "The
Masses of Johann Caspar Kerl", Sat.,
Aug. 11, East Council Room, Rackham
Bldg., at 9:00 a.m. Chairman, H. T.
David.
Doctoral Examination for Hayden
Richard Smith Education; thesis: "The
Effectiveness of Two Instructional Pro-
cedures in Comparative Education",
Monday, Aug. 13, 4024 University High
School, at 10:00 a.ni. Chairman, C. A.
Eggertsen.
Doctoral Examination for Barbara
Ellen Forker, Education; thesis: "The
Effects of a Season of Basketball Prac-
tice on College Freshmen as Indicated
by Selected Tests of Fatigue", Mon.,
Aug. 13, West Council Room, Rackham
Bldg., at 1:00 p.m. Chairman, P. A.
Hunsicker.
Placement Notices
The Air Force has several vacancies

rMLecLtiolt in modern Gaoling

DIAL NO 2-2513
ALL NEW! IN WARNERCOLR
COLOR FEATUREFTTE
WORLD NEWS
COLOR CARTOON
Shows at 1,. 5, 7, 9 P.M.

for Directors and Assistants in a new
recreation program in the Arizona,
Texas and Nevada, Crew Training Air
Force area. All Service Club personnel
must possess the prerequisite personal
qualifications of acceptable personality
traits, of loyalty, integrity, and dis-
cretion. They must be single, female,
U. S. citizen, and have training and/or
experience in recreational activities
including arts and crafts, dramatics,
music or group recreation. For addi-
tional information contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Administration
Bldg. No. 3-1511, Ext. 489.
The following schools have listed va-
cancies for the 1956-57 school year.
They are not sending representatives to
the Bureau of Appointments at the
present time.
Arlington Heights, Iliiois - Teach-
er Needs: Elementary (1st grade).
Bakersfield, California (Kenn County
Schools) -- Teacher Needs: Elementary
(kdg. to 8th); High School Girl's Phy-
sical Education; General Science
(man); Special Education; Speech Cor-
rectionist.
Baroda, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Elementary (1st, 2nd).
Battle Creek, Michigan - Teacher
Needs: Junior High English; Math;
General Science; Late Elementary.
Bay City, Michigan -- Teacher Needs:
Math (Business or straight Math); So-
cial Studies/Math.
Beaver Falls, New York - Teacher
Needs: Girls Physical Education, ju-
nior/senior High; High School English.
Boyne City, Michigan - Teacher
Needs: High School English.
Elizabeth City, North Carolina -
Teacher Needs: Band - Assistant Di-
rector.
Flat Rock, Michigan-Teacher Needs:
Elementary (Kindergarten); Junior
High Math.
Hartland, Michigan -Teacher Needs:
Elementary (5th, 6th); Elem. Music/,
Art.
Luther, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Band;~ High School.
North Branch, Michigan - Teacher
Needs: High School Government/Geog-
rapyh/Driver Training.
Oscoda, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Industrial Arts; Social Studies.
Owendale, Michigan- Teacher Needs:
Industrial Arts, Jr./Sr. High,
Otter Lake, Michigan - Teacher
Needs: High School Math; Junior High;
Elementary.
Pontiac, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
organization
Notices

Elementary Vocal Music; Special Edu-
cation (handicapped); Latin, Junior
High; Latin, Senior High; Girls' Physi-
cal Education.
St. Louis, Missouri (Maplewood-Rich-
mons Schools) - Teacher Needs: In-
strumental Music (Strings).
Vassar, Michigan -- Teacher Needs:
Elementary (Kdg.); Girl's Phys. Edu-
cation; Speech Correction.
Williamsburg, Michigan - Teacher
Needs: Elementary (Kdg./5th/6th Com-
bination); Indus. Arts (shop)/Driver
Training.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, No. 3-1511, Ext.
89.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
A religious foundation in Ann Arbor,
has an opening for a Secretary. Must
be able to take shorthand. Will do
some mimeographing.
Daisy Manufacturing Co., Plymouth,
Mich., is looking for a Publicity Man
to travel and show the Daisy Air Rifle
line to retailers.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 371.

I

SALE

20%

on our entire stock

d8
low,

INDIA ART SHOP
330 Maynard Street

..
I'
_,
f.

You will like the
Jayar Tea Cart .b.
It takes but little
room when folded.

I

Phone NO 8-6779

JOHN LEIDY

9 601 East Liberty

I

y

i
'4

FRIDAY at 7 and 9
i "THE WILD ONE"
with
Marion Brando Mary Murphy
SATURDAY at 7 and 9
SUNDAY at 8 only

Make your spring frocks
graceful
"stand-outs"
with
Bouffant
Petticoat
Just in time to glamorize your
prettiest spring dressesl Ex-
tra-wide, tiered petticoat
in Everglaze cotton-the
enchanting fabric that
washes so beautifully,
dries in a flash. Smooth
I.. fit elastic waist band.
Rich embroidery
C t, j highlights the 2
(J wide, wide hem
ruffles. White.
a t,7 4- Sizes- S-.

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Gals Who Paint, Plant and Put Together Wear ...

ioretiganls
For those do-it-yourself jobs. Don't take
the chance of ruining your pretty house-
dresses or piay clothes when you have
hard work and messy chores to do .
wear KORETIGANS by KORET OF CALl-
FORNIA. These garments, constructed
especially for your do-it-yourself jobs of
sturdy, Sanforized, Indigo Blue Denim,
will not bind or restrict body movements.
KORETIGANS bear a money back guar
antee on these features: waistband will
not lose elasticity . . . safety stitched,
overlocked seams will not pull out. KOR-
ETIGAN shirt is in red - guaranteed
washable and of press free cotton,

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WORK-DAY CLOTHES
W tH A
PLAY-DAY AIR
Koretigan Slacks .._,$4.95
Koretigan Skirt $4.95
Koretigan Shirt $3.95
Koretigan Jacket -.$4.95
Koretigan Smarty Pants
$3.95
Koretigan Shorts .$2.95

1

I

For
Kore
' for
and

these and all of
ac's mix & match
wea rabies
work, campus
play.,. shop at

Israeli Folk Dancing -- Free instruc-
tion. Sunday evening, August 12, 1956,
8:00 p.m. at Hillel. Everyone welcome.
Lutheran Student Chapel (National
Lutheran Council) Hill St. and S. For-
est Ave. Sunday evening at 7:00 pro-
gram followed by Coffee Hour. Dr.

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