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August 10, 1956 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-08-10

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VAGF FOUR

TRY MICHIGAN DAILY

FRMAY, AUGUST 10, 1959

t'AGE FOUR THE MTCHIGAN~ DAILY FRIDAY. AUGUST 18. 195ff

.._ , ._ v v _ _ . _.,,, .

Red Sox

Take Second Place in American League

Edge Orioles, 3-1; Yankees.
Remain 8 Games Ahead

'S

By The -Associated Press
BOSTON - Frank Sullivan's
six-hit pitching, aided by Jim
Piersall's two-run single, carried
Boston to a 3-1 victory over Bal-
timore yesterday - the Red .Sox'
eighth triumph in nine games.
The victory moved the winners
into second place in the American
League - 8% games behind the
New York Yankees.
Ted Williams, on his best be-
havior for the second straight day
collected two singles, a walk and

JIM PIERSALL
..helps lift Red Sox
reached first on an error. Wil-
liams was fined $5,000 Tuesday for
a spitting episode.
Williams started off the Red
Sox sixth, in which the team
scored all its runs, with a single.
An error and a walk preceded
Piers.ll's decisive blow. Jackie
Jensen came home with an in-
llajor Lea gue
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

surance tally as Sammy White hit
into a double play.
Yanks 15, Senators 7
WASHINGTON - New York's
league-leading Yankees flung all
their hitting power against Wash-
ington's dragging Senators yester-
day afternoon and scored a 15-71
slugfest victory in which Mickey
Mantle smashed his 39th homer of
the season.
Al t o g e t h e r the two teams
banged out 32 hits, with the Yanks
slamming six Washington pitchers
for 20 of them.
Bill Martin socked a two-run
homer for the victors and Andy
Carey walloped one that accounted
for three runs. Both those blows
came in the first inning and gave
the Yanks a five-run lead they
never relinquished.
Mantle belted his homer to
score Yogi Berra ahead of him.
The clout put Mantle 11 games
ahead of Bab Ruth's pace of 1927.
when the Bambino set the record
of 60 for a season.
* * *
A's 5, Tigers 3
DETROIT - Home runs by Gus
Zernial and Cletus Boyer carried
the Kansas City Athletics to a
5-3 triumph over the Detroit Ti-
gers yesterday and broke a six-
game losing streak for the last-
place A's.
Zernial's homer came in the
first inning with two on. Boyer
hit his in the second.
The A's wound up their scoring
in the third inning against starter
Virgil Trucks and failed to hit
safely over the last six innings.
. * *
White Sox 9, Indians 2
CHICAGO-The Chicago White
Sox routed Early Wynn in a six-
run seventh inning yesterday to
whip the Cleveland Indians 9-2
and dropthem. into third place in
the American League.
During the seventh. inning, the
Sox equaled the major league rec-
ord for number of players on one
team hit by pitched balls in a
single season. When Art Houtte-
man, in relief for Wynn, hit Min-
nie Minoso with a pitch, it raised
the Sox total of hit batsmen to 59.
This ties the mark set by Wash-
ington in 1921. Minoso has been
the target of 18 of the "plunk-
ings."
The Sox had only a 3-2 lead un-
til the big blowoff in the sixth
which brought them their fourth
straight victory. After walks to
Larry Doby and Jim Rivera, sand-
wiching a single by Minoso, had
loaded the bases, Sherm Lollar
singled for two runs. Walt Dropo's
sacrifice fly scored Rivera, and
when Fred Hatfield singled, Hout-
teman replaced Wynn.
Jack Harshman, the winning
pitcher, singled, scoring Lollar and
sending Hatfield to third from
where he ran ~home on Luis Apar-
icio's sacrifice bunt.

MINNIE MINOSO
. . pitchers' favorite target
Oyakawa
G ainsBerth
In Olympics
DETROIT (A')-Hawaii's Yoshi
Oyakawa, 'Olympic champion in
the men's 100-meter backstroke,
qualified to defend his title by
winning the finals of the U.S.
Olympic swimrtiing trials last
night in one minute 5.2 seconds-
two-tenths of a second better than
his own Olympic record.
Two other prime favorites in the
event-17-year-old Frank McKin-
ney, Jr. of Indianapolis and tower-
ing Al Wiggins of Pittsburgh-also
made the U.S. team by finishing
second and third, respectively, to
Oyakawa's churning arms.
Earlier yesterday schools girls
Carin Cone and Sylvia Ruuska and
collegian Richard Fadgen contin-
ued the assault on American swim-
ming records in preliminary trials.
Miss Cone, a comely 16-year-old
high school junior from Ridge-
wood, N. J., cut a tenth of a second
off her own mark in leading pre-
liminary trials in the women's 200-
meter backstroke in 1:14.4. She
had done 1:14.5 in the National
AAU at Tyler, Tex., July 7.
Miss Ruuska, 14-year-old daugh-
ter of an immigrant Finnish elec-
trician from Berkeley, Calif., swam
the women's 400-meter freestyle
in 5:10.7, the best ever in the
specialty in the United States.
Fadgin, a Woonsocket, R. I., boy
who attends North Carolina State,
led the men's 200-meter breast-
stroke in 2:44 flat, also a record.

Gridders Set
For All-Star
Tilt Tonight
CHICAGO (P) - Traditionally
the glittering harbinger of the
gridiron season, the annual All-
Star football game tonight, will
send the cream of the 1955 colle-
giate crop against the favored,
and revenge-seeking Cleveland
Browns.
This 23rd contest in a colorful
series will attract an expected
70,000 into Soldier Field and will
be telecast and broadcast (ABC
beginning at 8:30 p.m. EST.)
Brown Seeking Revenge
Paul Brown, still smarting from
a 30-27 upset by the collegians
last, year has whipped his Na-
tional Football League cham-
pions almost into regular season
sharpness to avert what would be
stinging humiliation for the proud
Brown boss - two successive All-
Star game defeats.
Brown has done such a good
job the pros are rated almost a
two-touchdown f a v o r i t e over
Coach Curley Lambeau's galaxy
of 50 hand-picked collegiate stars.
Time Ran Out
Lambeau and his aides, on the
other hand, complain that time
may have run out on them before
the All-Stars jelled to, their full
capabilities.
What makes the All-Stars some-
what a question mark in tonight's
battle is the fact Lambeau has
not been able to settle on a num-
ber one quarterback, like Notre
Dame's Ralph Guglielmi last year.
Good Quarterback Job Expected
He is bound to get something
better than an average job of sig-
nal-calling and passing from a
quarterback corps including Mich-
igan State's Earl Morrall, Navy's
George Welsh," Iowa's Jerry Rei-
chow and Wisconsin's Jim
Haluska.
The game again will be played
under the pros' free substitution
rule.
The pros hold a 13-7 margin in
the series which started in foot-
ball's low -scoring era with a 0-0
tie in 1934 between the All-Stars
and the Chicago Bears.
A key late field goal by Ohio
State's Tad Weed gave the All
Stars the hard-fought victory last
year.

By 'The Associated Press

_1

MILWAUKEE -Stan M u s i a11

Braves Split Twin Bill with Cardinals;
Dodgers, Redlegs, Giants Top Opponents

;I

STAN MUSIAL
* . . gives Cards another split
' INet Star
Eliminated
In Tourney
SOUTH ORANGE, N. J. (P) -
Three Australians and one
Frenchman invaded the .quarter-
finals of the Eastern Grass Court
tennis tournament yesterday as
Vic Seixas and Ham Richardson
kept United States' hopes alive
by rallying for three-set victories.
Michigan's Barry MacKay, win-
ner of two early-round matches,
was defeated by Jack Frost in a
see-saw battle, 6-2, 3-6, 6-1.
Sexias disposed of Cliff Mayne,
4-6,6-2,6-4, and Richardson de-
feated Australian Roy Emerson,
6-3, 1-6, 8-6.
Aussies Ken Rosewall, Neale
Fraser and Ashley Cooper and
Frenchman Paul Remy advanced
also.

batted in three runs last night as
the St. Louis Cardinals defeated
the Milwaukee Braves, 5-1, in the
second game of a doubleheader.
The Braves took the first game,
4-1, on the three-hit pitching ofj
rookie Taylor Phillips.
The split put the Braves 1'
games ahead of runnerup Brook-
lyn in the tight National League
race and two games in front of
third-place Cincinnati.
The Braves used four pitchers,
including loser Gene Conley who
was chased in the fifth after'
giving up six hits for four runs.
Tom Poholsky went the route for
the Cardinals and was touched
for'eight hits.
Phillips, now 2-0, walked two
and struck out six, in winning the'
opening game.
* * *
Dodgers 7, Pirates 3
PITTSBURGH - The Brooklyn
Dodgers took another step yester-
day toward the top of the National
League, easing past the Pittsburgh
Pirates, 7-3.
Brooklyn's early offense was
aided by three Pittsburgh errors,
and reinforced by a masterful re-
lief pitching job on the part of
Ed Roebuck.
Roebuck relieved Carl Erskine
in the fourth with the score 6-3,
two on and none out. He allowed
only two hits the rest of the way.
One of the eight Pittsburgh hits
was Frank Thomas' homer off
Erskine in the fourth.
Meanwhile the Dodgers were
collecting 13 hits off a parade of
five Pittsburgh pitchers.
* * *
Redlegs 5, Cubs 3
CINCINNATI -- The Cincinnati
Redlegs resorted to their favorite
weapon, the home run, again yes-

..:

ball over the right field screen
and the game was over.
It was Lawrence's 16th victory
against four defeats.
Cincinnati used five pitchers in-
cluding Hershell Freeman, who
twisted his neck trying to field
Ernie Banks' grounder. He com-
plained of dizziness immediately
afterward and was taken to Christ
Hospital for X-rays.
* * 9
Giants 5, Phils 2
NEW YORK - The last-place
New York Giants broke Philadel- 4
phia's six-game winning streak,
5-2, yesterday with an 11-hit at-
tack that included two homers by '
Jackie Brandt and one each by
Willie Mays and Bill White. t
Brandt hit two in successive
times at bat in the fifth and sev-
enth. Mays slugged his in the i
third and White his leading off
the fourth.
Joe Margeroni, young Giant left
hander, was rolling along with a
five-hit shutout until the seventh
when a single by Willie Jones and
Andy Seminick's homer broke his
charm.

JACKIE BRANDT
... two homers stop Phils
terday, to come from behind and
defeat the Chicago Cubs, 5-3.
Until the eighth, Cincinnati had
scored only once off bonus pitch-
er Don Kaiser, and that was a
home run in the second inning by
Eddie Bailey. Then, with two out
and Frank Robinson on base, Ted
Kluszewski hit his 27th homer of
the season -to tie the game.
After Brooks Lawrence, who
went to the mound with one out
in the ninth, again turned back
the Cubs in the extra inning, Rob-
inson walked and Gus Bell hit the

MID-SEASON
CHAMPIONSHIP
A 50-Lapper with 24 Cars
Plus 7 Other Events!

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Fountain Pens
School Supplies
Chairs

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USTA Moves Hambletonian
From New York to Illinois

W L Pet

New York
Boston
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
Baltimore
Washington
Kansas City

70
61
60
55
50
47
43
37

37
45
48
57
59
63
69

.654
.575
.571
.534
.467
.443
.406
.349

t

TODAY'S GAMES
Baltimore at New York (N)
Boston at Washington (N)
Cleveland at Kansas City (N)
Chicago at Detroit (N)
NATIONAL LEAGUR

W L Pct
Milwaukee 63 41 .606
Brooklyn 62 43 .590
Cincinnati 62 44 .585
St. Louis 53 53 .500
Philadelphia 51 53 .490
Pittsburgh 45 59 .433
Chicago 43 60 .417
New York 37 63 .370
TODAY'S GAMES

c

GB
8Y2
9
13
20
22x,4
26%-
32 l
GB
12
2
11
18
19Y4
24
d early

GOSHEN, N. Y. (P)--The Ham-
bletonian Society yesterday took
a slap at the New York State
Harness Racing Commission and
awarded the famous stake for
three-year-old trotters to Du
Quoin, Ill. located some 75 miles
from St. Louis.

Typewriters
Electric
Standard
Portable
Desks - Files
Comptometer Dictation Machines
MORRILL'S
314 S. State St.
Since 1908 Phone NO 3-2481

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SPORTS SHORTS:
Wininger Leads in Tam O'Shanter

In a statement by E. Roland
Harriman, president of the organ-
ization which has sponsored the
famous stake since its inaugural
in 1926, the society said:
"The directors of the Hamble-
tonian Society were agreed that
the proper place for the Hamble-
tonian is Goshen. However, in
view of the unsatisfactory condi-
tions under which harness racing
is being administered in New York
State at the present time, a con-
tract was awarded for two years
to the Du Quoin State Fair, Du
Quoin, Ill., by a unanimous vote."
New York State Commissioner
George Monaghan and the United
States Trotting Association, which
controls trotting and pacing
throughout the country, have been
feuding ever since the commis-
sioner took office.

SAT. NITE, AUG. 11
Trials 7:00, 1st Race 8:30
JACKSON MOTOR
SPEEDWAY
Just North of Jackson
on M-50

I

t

Races Every Sat. Nite
Rai Date Sunday Nite

I

Cincinnati at Milwaukee (N)
Philaelpha athBrooklyn (N)
St. Louis at. Chicago
*New York at Pittsburgh (N)
*To be preceded by finish of
season suspended game.

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO-Francis "Bo" Win-
inger of Odessa, Tex., slammed
into the first-round lead of the
$116,200 "World" championship at
Tam O'Shanter yesterday with a
seven-under-par 65.
The well-built, 33-year-old pro

Wiiams' Perverse Streak Brings Criticism;
Red Sox Slugger Conceals Admirable Traits

_u YZ'T1fi'r ARit1:1-r w..' M?1+Y

r,

By WHITNEY MARTIN
Associated Press Sports writer spoiled petulant brat screaming
As Ernest Thayer, author of and batting his head against the
Casey at the Bat, might have des- floor in a tantrum after a scold-
cribed it: ing.
There are many things about
Williams of the mighty bat, him we admire, aside from his
Heard the boos with rising rancor; remarkable skill and power as a
Then toward the hostile mob he hitter. We are aware of his many
spat, secret kindnesses - his unpubli-
CGiin sall d a n chilh anw. cized visits to hospitals, his drop-
Cronin, seated in the stand, ping off bundles of magazines un-
Watched the scene, was heard to der cover of darkness at hospital
mutter: doors, his generosity to less af-
I'll fine Teddy bo ave grand; fluent friends.
He can't make Fenway Park a
gutter." Conceals Admirable Traits
Life of Williams But there is a perverse streak in
That about sums up the latest his nature which urges him to
episode in the life and times of conceal his admirable traits and
Theodore Samuel Williams, the show only those which leave him
fisherman who plays left field for' open for criticism. It is as if he
the Boston Red Sox during the off liked being disliked. Without con-
season. troversy swirling about his hand-
Personally, we likethe big guy, some head he seems lost.
but that doesn't mean we condone Stubborn might be the word for
his behavior, which in the inci- him. Strictly an individualist, he
dent, Tuesday was that of a has an inborn resentment against
Enjoy PI
ot the
DEL RIO RESTAURANT

conforming to accepted customs,
His refusal to touch his cap after
hitting a home run is an indica-
tion of this personal rebellion.
His shunning of a necktie is an-
other.
His rabbit ears single out the
boos among the cheers ,and in-
stead of ignoring them as other
ball players do he broods over
them and in showing his resent-
ment he antagonizes those who
had come to cheer.
Rated Censure
He rated censure for his ex-
hibition Tuesday. After all, in even
such a sordid sport as boxing a
fighter spitting toward the spec-
tators would be banned for life.
The incident really was just an
incident, that's all, and we don't
believe it will undermine base-
ball.
The serious touch was the $5,000
fine. That's pretty stiff for a vio-
lation of the sanitary code.

was among the horde of marks-
men who shattered par 36-36-72
on Tam's 6,915-yard acreage.
The tournament committee
made the course easier for the
first round by sticking the pins
fairly well in the middle of the
greens.
Errie Ball, 45-year-old club pro
at Oak Park, Ill., carved 35-31-66
and Cary Middlecoff, the 1956
National Open champion, shot 32-
34-66.
In all, 18 players were within'
four shots of leader Wininger in
the blanket first-round jockeying.
Other divisions of the "world"
jamboree shaped up with these
leaders:
Women pros - Mickey Wright,
Chula Vista, Calif., with five-
under-par 71.
Women amateurs-Wanda San-
ches of Baton Rouge, Ia., with 78.
Men amateurs - Martin Stano-j
vich, Tam O'Shanter Club mem-
ber, with 70.
Among the bigshot pros who
trailed were Sam Snead, clustered
with 10 others at 70; Dow Fin-
sterwald, leading PGA money win-
ned andMike Souchak, jammed
with 17 at 71; defending "World"

champion Julius Boros at 72 and
Ed Furgol and Lew Worsham at
73.
* * *
Lowry Wins Disputed Decision
SAGINAW (W) - Pat Lowry,
hard-hitting Toledo, m i d d 1 e-
weight, won a loudly disputed
split decision over Yama Bahama
of the Bahamas last night in a
10-round fight that ended with
Bahama as the announced winner.
Half an hour after the bout
ended, Jack Fogarty, Michigan
Boxing Commission representative
announced that a corrected error
on the card of Judge Harold An-
derson gave Lowry the victory.

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