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August 03, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-08-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 3, 1956

'I IIE MICHIGAN DAII. V

rAGE THRER

.F. .A.,.AUGUST....9...TH.. -I-HI--N--- . . .G.......

FINANCIAL AID:
Dean Rea Explains Use
Of ScholarshipFunds

A student in need of money at
' the University has a good chance
of getting it, but he will be asked
a lot of questions.
In addition toscholarships and
loan funds. the University has
limited funds for ,grants-in-aid.
A grant-in-aid is a supplemen-
tary fund available when a stu-
dent is "up against it." Much of it,
but not all, is repaid,
Walter B. Rea, Dean of Men,
reported that in the fiscal year
ended June 30 the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs made grants-in-aid
of $46,082.16 to 362 male students
for an average of $127.00 each.
(Grants to women students are
handled in the Office of the Dean
of Women and are not included in
Dean Rea's report.)
"Grants range from $5.00 to
'help a boy buy food' to a top of
about $900.00 total to help pay
board and room, semester fees,
and hospital expenses." Most
grants are "well under $100.00",
Dean Rea reported, "Only three
or four have been more than
$500.00," he added.
Rea, noted, in response to a
question, that "the largest grant
was not to a football player." He
said chemistry and physics stu-
dents, writers and graduate stu-
dents fare better on financial aid
at Michigan than do athletes.
Loans and grants are spread over
all types of students, including
graduate as well as undergraduate
foreign as well as American citi-
zens.
There is no discrimination
against an athlete, though not 10
DIAL 2-3136
\ 1 NOW
RIDE WITH 'EM !
LAUGH WITH 'EMI f
SING WITH 'EM I
para.ou.t

per cent of Michigan's varsity ath-
letes seek aid. But these, grants
are scrutinized carefully, Rea said.
"Aid given to athletes must not
only meet Michigan's strict re-
quirements, but as well must con-
form to the regulations of the
Western Conference (Big Ten), of
which Michigan is a member. The
records are sent regularly to the
Commissioner and are always
open to the Commissioner", Dean
Rea pointed out. While names of
recipients are not made public, ex-
ceptions are made for the Com-
missioner or his representative in
order that he may have full know-
ledge of the grants, loans, and
scholarships, the Dean exeplained.
The applicant for a grant or
loan must present abudget and
show his need. Each request is
given individual attention through
a screening process. Most requests
are considered by a committee
made up of Dean Rea, Herbert
G. Watkins, University secretary
who represents the Regents, Deb-
orah Bacon, dean of women (for
women's loans and grants), and
Frederick E. Oliver, chief accoun-
tant of the University.
James A. Lewis, vice president
of Student Affairs is consulted on
matters of policy. John Bingley,
assistant dean of men, supervises
details.
One of the cases which the com-
mittee likes most to help is the
reliable student who finds himself
with special misfortune, such as
his own illness or that of his
chief supporter. In the case of a
student who largely supports him-
self by working part-time and be-
comes ill or is injured, the hourly
income is usually shut off by the
employer. Here the University
steps in with a grant-in-aid, or a
loan depending upon need and cir-
cumstances at the time.
a a

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Grace Kelly
Expects Heir
In February
MONTE CARLO (,) - Tiny
Monaco burst with king-sized cele-
bration yesterday.
Therpalace announced Prince
Rainier III1 and his Hollywood
Princess, Grace Kelly, are expect-
ing a child in February.
Flags, bunting, c h a m p a gne
toasts and Gallic "oh, la, las"
could hardly measure the joy of
Monacans, who want nothing
more than the patter of tiny feet
around the stone and stucco pal-
ace overlooking the Mediter-
ranean.
With the fidgeting over, Monaco
prepared a celebration second only
to the fanfare of floodlights and
pageantry given the wedding it-
self last April 18-19.
The Prince and Princess pre-
pared to flee the clamor by em-
barking on their yacht Sunday
for a cruise along the Italian
coast.
A royal heir is extremely im-
portant to Monacans. By a 1918
treaty with France, Monaco would
become a French protectorate and
Monacans subject to French taxes
and the French military draft if
Rainier died without a child.
The 4,000 citizens of this 360-
acre principality pay no direct
taxes now and there is no draft
for citizens.
The Monte Carlo gambling ca-
sino pays about 10 per cent of
budget and the remainder comes
from a government monopoly on
cigarettes, matches and the sale
of postage stamps.
The royal yacht Deo Juvante II,
on which the 32-year-old Prince
and the 26-year-old Princess spent
their honeymoon, maneuvered
into position to take them on an-
other Mediterranean cruise before
they depart Sept. 20 for a two-
month visit to the United States.
To Attend Meeting
University Regent Roscoe Bo-
nisteel, Law School Dean E.
Blythe Stason, and Prof. William
J. Pierce will attend the National
Conference of Commissioners on
Uniform State Laws in Dallas,
Tex., August 20-25.
The group will serve as Michi-
gan's three commissioners at the
conference. Among the uniform
laws the conference is expected to
consider will be the so-called "blue
sky" laws on security transactions,
an estate tax apportionment act,
and an interstate weather control
compact.
League Dance
Poul Brodie's Orchestra will play
for the last summer dance in the
League Ballroom, Saturday, 9-12
P.m.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2 25 3.33
4 1.041 2,60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11;00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
WANTED TO RENT
GRAD ATE ST UDENTrWould like to
rent anoo or an ap artment as of
September. Prefers that it be close to
campus. If interested, write Louis J.
' 270 N. Sith St. Milwaukee,
WVi con sin.)L
SITUATION WANTED
SECOND world war Veteran wants per-
manent night Janitor or night watch-
man work, Reliable. NO-2-9020. )S
USED CARS
TRIUMPH TR2 .- 1955, several extras.
$1,900. NO? 2-8205. )
1941 CHRYSLER CONVERTABLE, me-
chanically strong. Best offer. Call NO
3-8460. )N

CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL
WANTED-riders to M i e via New York
r1ruway, about Aug. 17. Phone NO
8-58457.F
WOMAN COMPANION wanted to share
expenses and driving to Greensboro
North Carollna or vicinity, References
exichangedi. Call NO 3-1355. 1
YONG GRADUATE WOMAN-is look-
ig for a roomm~ate anid a plac1e to
li'e near campus. Call NO 3-3575. )F
HELP WANTED
WANTED-A Ri~o-TV copywriter, Full
tine. Must type. No experience neces-
sary. Call NO 2-5517. )H
APARTMENTS FOR RENT-
4-ROOM furnished apartment, two bed-
rooms anid bath. 1223 S. State. Avail.
able now. Acconiodates four adults.
No dirinking;. Utilities garage. Dial
3YP Ypsilanti 3-615xm,.18
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS APARTMENTS, 3 and 4 Adults
3 and 4 Rooms, nicely decorated and
furnished. Private bath. Call NO 2-
0035 or 8-6205 or 3-4594.
BUSINESS SERVICES

FOR SALE
1948 PLYMOUTH, tudor, radio, heater,
Good clean transportation. Dick Mil-
ler, 106 Adams Hse. W. Quad. )B
GREAT DANE -Female, 8 months,
spayed, house-broken, fawn with
black mask. $50 to good home. Call
Plymouth 2945 days, 851r evenings. )B
1951 HOUSE 'rRAILER-3-rooms, Kit-
chen, Living and Bedrooms. Com-
pletely furnished, 30 ft. 2 bottle gas
tanks, heated with fuel oil. Very good
condition. $1,800 cash, NO-2-9020. )B

TYPING-Theses, term papers, ate.
Reasonable rates, prompt service. 830
South Main, NO 8-7590. )J
WASHINGS, finished work, ironing sep-
aratelyl Specialize on cotton dresses,
blouses, wash skirts. Free pick-up and
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. )J
SIAMESE CAT Stud Service, Registered.
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. )J
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

It's the best
durn west-urn
you ever roared at!
[ORI NElSON JEFF MORROW
JACKIE LOUGHERY
W01K A RAGN ES MOOREHIAD
\ a Noit AUL ]CIS ,.,,, ,,K MMMI THROB
- also-
BUGS
BUNNY
in
"Barbary Coast"
Bunny"

"I

'rfectioy in Modern Coolng '

DIAL NO 2-2513
The World's Most
Guarded Secret
Now Revealed!

(Continued from Page 2)
Anyone interested in the Classics is in-
vited.
Placement Notices
The following schools have listed va-
cancies for the' school year of 1956-
1957. They will not send representatives
to the Bureau of Appointments for in-
terviews at this time.
Armada, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Elementary (1st, 2nd).
Chicago, Illinois (South Chicago
Community Center) - Nursery School
Director.
Connerville, Indiana-Teacher Needs:
Elementary Music (woman).
Covina, California -- Teacher Needs:
Elementary (Kdg., 1st, 2nd, 3rd. 4th,
5th, 6th); 7th/Sth Grade Core.
Flint, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Junior High Instrumental Music
(Band/Orchestra).
Garden City, Michigan - Teacher
Needs: Elementary; Junior High Art/
Engilish or Social Studies.
Inkster, Michigan -- Teacher Needs:
Math.
New Paltz, New York-Teacher Needs:
Elementary (1st); Girls' Phys. Educa-
tion (high school); 7th/8th Grade So-
cial Studies (woman); Special Class
Teacher.
Mount Clemens, Michigan (L'Anse
Creuse schools) - Elementary.
New Haven, Michigan - Teacher
Needs: Girls' Physical Education; In-
strumental Music (Band).
North Plainfield, New Jersey-Teach-
er Needs: Elementary; Speech Correc-
tion.
St. Clair Shores, Michigan (Lakeview
Public Schools) - Elementary (6th
grade).
Vassar, Michigan - Teacher Needs:
Elementary (4th grade); High School
English; Junior High Gen. Science;
High School Girls' Phys. Ed.; Social
Studies/American History.
Willow Run, Michigan -- Teacher
Needs: Elementary (2nd, 3rd, 4th).
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, No. 3-1511, Ext.
Organization
'Congregational and Disciples Guild-
Joint Picnic outing to Cascades, Jack-
son Mich. Sunday. Aug. 5, 5:30 p.m.
Meet at Presbyterian Church, Wash-
tenaw Avenue.
Lutheran Student Association. Sun-
day 7 p.m. program followed by coffee
hour. Olin Storvick, professor of clas-
sic, will speak on "My research in
Greece as related to the New Testa-
ment." Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill
and S. Forest.

By DAVID L. BOWEN
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
The Suez Canal-now the prize
in an international tug-of-war be-
tween Egypt and the big powers of
the West-is a 103-mile ditch
through desert sand that last year
carried nearly 116 millions tons
of shipping.
Although this is well over twice
the tonnage passing through the
Panama Canal, Suez is not the
world's busiest man-made water-
way. That distinction is held by
the hard-working but unromantic
locks of the St. Mary's River con-
necting Lakes Superior and Huron
at the city of Sault Ste. Marie,
Mich.
Unlike either the locks of the
St. Mary's River or the Panama
Canal, ships are neither raised nor
lowered on their way through the
Suez Canal. There is only a 10
inch difference in water levels
between the Mediterranean and
the Red Seas. The unstable sands
of the canal banks present the
only maintenance problem.
The strategic importance of the
Suez is that it provides a short-
cut from the Atlantic and Medit-
erranean to the oceans of Asia.
As the inset on the accompanying
map shows, vessels from England
bound for India can save about
5,000 miles by using the canal.
The importance of this short-
cut has been tremendously in-
creased since the end of World
War II by the development of the
vast oil fields in the Middle past.
This region now produces about
25 per cent of the total oil pumped
in the free world. Most of it is
used by the industries of Western
Europe. In recent years, more than
half the approximately 15,000 an-
nual passage at Suez have been
by oil tankers.
Trouble at Suez-either blocking
of the canal or higher tolls-could
cause serious trouble to American
industry and the American con-
sumer. Last year 11 million tons

of cargo, most of it raw materials
from the Far East, passed through
the canal bound for the United
States. About 90 per cent of the
natural rubber used in this coun-
try comes through the Suez, along
with about 60 per cent of the tin
consumed by American industries.
About one-third of the manganese
imported by the United States
comes from India via Suez.
The current ship toll is less than
one cent a ton-mile, about half
the charge levied foruse of the
Panama Canal. Despite' the low
toll Suez produced gross revenues
of 99 million dollars last year,
which yielded a net profit of 46
million.
The British, besides owning the
biggest single block of shares in
the Compagnie Universelle du
Canal Maritime de Suez (44 per
cent of the total), have been the
canal's biggest customer. The
United States is second.
The canal was built by a
Frenchman, Ferdinand de Lesseps,
and opened in 1869. Although they
protested its construction, the
British bought into the interna-
tional corporation operating the
waterway six years after the open-
ing. They gradually became the
dominant power in canal opera-
tion and came out of World War
II with extensive military instal-
lations in the Canal Zone valued
at one billion dollars.
I

These became one of the chief
targets of Egyptian nationalism
after the overthrow of King Fa-
rouk and Britain was pushed in
1954 into signing an agreement to
evacuate all her bases on Egyptian
soil. The last British Tommy left
Suez in June.
The original bargain between
de Lesseps and Egypt gave the
Egyptian government a guarantee
of 15 per cent of the canal's an-
nual profits. However, the Egypt-
ians sold both their shares and
this guarantee to a French syndi-
cate in 1880-before the canal be-
came a gold mine.
In March of 1949, Egypt was
written back into the profits and
was granted 7 per cent of the an-
nual profits. This was to continue
until 1968, when the canal com-
pany's 99-year lease was sched-
uled to expire and the property
would have reverted free and in-
tact to Egyptian hands.

..

-W

' EIII

-Im

6588 Jackson Rd.
Beginning Tonight
"GLORY"
and
"QUINCANNON
FRONTIER SCOUT"

4675 Washtenaw Ave.
Starts Tonight
"BACKLASH"
and
"WORLD IN MY CORNER"

Continuing
our Famous

i

....

-U

m

Enjloy PIZZA
at the
DEL RIO RESTAURANT
122 West Washington at Ashley
CARRY-OUT SERVICE
BEER and WINE served
Hours: 11 A.M.-12 P.M. (Closed Tues.)
Phone NO 2-9575

I

SALINE MILL
THEATRE
US 112--2 Mile West of Saline
"THE PURSUIT OF
HAPPINESS"
Admission $1.65 Curtain 8:30
Telephone Saline 31
for Reservations

TONIGHT AT8
Deportment of Speech Presents
Christopher Fry's
THE LADYS NOT FOR BURNING
$1.50 -$1.10- 75c
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

SEMI-ANNUAL SALE
of Fine Fashions.!
All from our regular stock. It is mid-summer to you but
to us it's getting ready for Fall and we must clear
our racks for new Fall stock.
]Dresses . . . Suits . . . Coats. . Sportswear
and Accessories at one-half and more off.
Extraordinary values in pride choice of season-
al merchandise.

I

--I

I

Cinepta qil

Friday at 7 and 9

Groups of fine wool Coats
and Suits originally 39.95
to 65, now from 19.98 to
29.95.

Shown Tonight at 7 and 9:30
Plus
Second First Run Feature
LON CHANEY
in
"The Indestructible Man"

CLASSES NOW FORMING
Professional training for business positions, at a saving of time and
money. Choose one of these practical courses,

SECRETARIAL
ACCOUNTING
STENOGRAPHIC
BOOKKEEPING

SPEEDWRITING
STENOGRAPH
BUSINESS MACHINES
CLERK TYPIST

"THE QUIET MAN"
with
John Wayne Maureen O'Hara
Saturday at 7 and 9
Sunday at 8 only
"MIfl:D lAMfnlhAMAmnf DW"

Linen and Faille
Coats at 10.00 and

Better dresses of every kind
including evening cocktail
and bridesmaid dresses or-
iginally to 49.95at 112.
Budget Dresses and Cot-
tons . . , 2 groups 7.00 and
10.00 ... many originally
to 29.95.

Duster
14.98.

See the NEW LOOK
at Ann Arbor's
AMERICAN LEGION CLUB

FREE PLACEMENT SERVICE. We are receiving many position offers
for each graduate.
AN OFFICE POSITION offers a good salary, opportunities for ad-
vancement, regular hours, paid vacations, and pleasant surround-
innc Fnry rnicrntin I nrvic hlo cna inlw i vna nr inorotor

Group of Summer Hand-
bags-straws, plastics and
Leathers originally 2.95 to
10.95. Nylon Blouses, sizes
32-44 . . . No-iron cotton
slips, originally 5.95 . . .
Hundreds of pieces of cos-
tume jewelry and rings, or-

All summer hats
5.00 originally..
12.95.

1.49
. 3.95

to
to

at the S.U. campus togs-
Dozens of Separates, Skirts,
Halters, Blouses, Shorts.

III

r

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