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July 13, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

)
r ' TUKDA'Y, JULY 13, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGR

.

Now

"SPUTTERS":
Antique Auto Nears Retirement

By BAERT BRAND
What started as a birthday gift
for a 12 year-old boy has been, for
11 years, "companion" and "edu-
cation" to John Bradfield, '55.
The gift was a black and blue,
two-toned oldsmobile of 1931 vin-
tage. "It's the only car I've ever
met that fights back," Bradfield
commented.
He cited evidence of this by tell-
ing of a bloody nose and a sprained
wrist which "Sputters," the car
by name, has "dished out."
Long Life
"Sputters," despite his temper-
ament, has lived a full life during
j her 23-year existence.
Over the course of 198,000 miles
she has been family car, coal
truck, a practical tool for travel,
and eventually according to its
owner, she will lapse into a hobby.
She was serving the "hitch" as
coal truck when Bradfield's father
saw the machine one morning
while driving to work in March,
1945.
At this time two coal dealers
had the back seat of "Sputters"
r out and boarded so as to carry
coal.
Birthday Gift
The elder Bradfield took a par-
ticular fancy to the conveyance be-
cause his son had a growing con-
cern for old cars and his 12th
birthday was approaching at, the
time.
lHe startled the owners with an
offer of $40, which they took with-
out hesitation.
Much to the father's disappoint-
ment the car would not start for
lack of compression in the engine.
So "Sputters" was initiated into
3 the ways of the Bradfield family
through a push to the nearest gas-
station for an injection of oil.
Ih fact, "Sputters" burned so
much oil as she rumbled off to her
new home in Barton Hills, just
outside of Ann Arbor, that she

I6

-Daily-Duane Poole
"SPUTTERS"--John Bradfield, '55, is cranking-up his 1931
Oldsmobile, demonstrating how he starts the "antique automobile,"
now a hobby.

created a cloud of smoke impen-
atrable to vision.
Bradfield recalls that two cars
were obliged to pull over to the
side of the road to allow the
s t r a n g e "smoking-machine" to
pass, which, he adds, was just as
well because she had no license
plates.
Shortly after this as "Sputters"
was establishing herself more firm-
ly in her owner's heart, he was
driving to class when he heard a
series of thumps and clanks from
the rear axel area.
He clattered to a halt for a red
light and as the car ceased motion,
her left rear side collapsed. As

Bradfield sat collecting himself
from the shock he caught sight of
the rear wheel rolling past the
car and out into the street.
In Retirement
Eventually, Bradfield intends "to
put 'Sputters' to pasture and give
her a well-deserved rest."
"Sputters" will reach her 25th
birthday in two years which will
make her an official "antique"
auto, according to her owner.
When that day arrives Brad-
field says that he will probably use
the automobile less for "batting
about town" and concentrate on
keeping her in good shape for old-
car competition and tours.

Gemologists
Tell Legends
History, Myths Seen
In Birthstone Stories
By SUE GARFIELD
As the second in the series of
birthstone legends, the history of
five stones, representing tfree
months, has been revealed by
leading gemodgists.
May
The emerald, birthstone for
May, has always been considered
a love stone, closely identified with
Venus and particularly propitious
for women, bringing them hap-
piness in love, comfort in domes-
tic affairs and safety in childbirth,
according to the Jewelry Indus-
try Council.
A rare gem, the emerald has
fascinated people from the earli-
est times. The most important
source of emeralds today is
South America. At the time of the
Spanish conquest, the Incas were
found to have a great wealth of
the gems, but the location of the
mines was kept secret from the
conquistadors.
By accident, a mine was discov-
ered at Muse in 1558, yielding
emeralds of the finest qudity of
color and purity and has been the
chief source ever since.
Gcld and emerald jewelry has
been found in the mounds of Tus-
cany, Herculaneum and Pompeii
-cities which lay in ruin hundred
of years before America was dis-
covered. Legend and supestition
have attached themselves to the
emerald, as they have to all gems.
It was once believed that magi-
cians could not weave a magic
spell about anyone who wore an
emerald.
June
June is the month of the pearl,
the alexandrite and the moon-
stone-all signifying health and
longevity, according tothe Coun-
cil.
The pearl has been described as
one of the most exquisite gems.
Long before they realized what it
was, primitive men were enchant-
ed by its delicate beauty and love-
ly sheen. With more imagination
than science, they decided that
pearls were created when dew
drops were caught in an oyster
shell.
Though pearls have been found
in all colors of the rainbow, the
ones considered most desirable
are those with a creamy roseate
tint. The pearl is important inI
Oriental legend as the chief syi-
bol of health, energy, beauty and
thought.
The alexandrite, found only in
Ceylon and the Urals, is green by
day and an amethyestine red by
candlelight. The change of color
makes it an exceptionally attrac-
tive ring stone for men.
The moonstone, a gem of limpid
and misty light, was once regarded
as a live charm during the waxing
of the moon, enabling the wear-
er to foretell the future during the
moon's waning.
Usually cut cabochon or dome-
shaped, it is often seen in rings
either alone as an individual gem
or combined with other stones.
Moonstones are found in Ceylon
and Burma. ,

Anna Russell, international con-
cert comedienne, will make her
first Droit area appearance Mon-
day, when she will present a con-
cert at 8:30 p.m. at Hill Auditor-
ium.
The program will be presented
as part of the University Summer
Session series, "Woman in the
World of Man."
Tickets on Sale
Tickets for the concert are
priced at $1.50, $1 and 50 cents and
may be purcheased at the Hill
Auditorium box office s t a r t i n g
Thursday. Mail orders are now
being accepted.
Famous for her vocal satires,
Miss Russell is also known as a
pantomimist, actress, singer, pian-
ist and an "impeccable musician,"

according to Prof. James B. Wal-
lace, secretary of the University
School of Music and a member of
the program committee.
Composer
Miss Russell composes all the
musical scores for her shows, in-
cluding that for each individual
musician in the orchestra.
Among the varied roles she as-
sumes are: a powerful Wagnerian
soprano dying on a funeral pyre;
acrobatic coloratura singing of Ital-
ian pizza; breathless French con-
cert artist and a psychoneurotic
popular singer.
Miss Russell also does a one-
woman Gilbert and Sullivan oper-
etta, taking the roles of the "homo-
genous chorus," patter-song artist,
a pure sharp-voiced heroine and
a fog-horn contralto.
Originally a student of serious
music, Miss Russell studies at the
Royal College of Music in her na-
tive London, specializing in voice,
piano, composition and cello.
Turned Comedienne
She turned to her present field
of entertainment upon discovering
the audience reaction to such ac-
cidents as breaking up a perform-
ance of "Cavalleria Rusticana" by
sliding into and knocking down the
prop church at the back of the
stage.
Miss Russell returned to opera
recently when she recorded the
witch's voice for "Hansel and
Gretel." She also made several ap-
pearances in the same role last
year with the New York City Opera
Company.
Soloist
In recent years Miss Russell has
been guest soloist with symphony
orchestras at Cincinnati, Roches-
ter, New Orleans, Toronto, Char-
lotte, Cleveland and Washington
D.C.
She has also starred in music
festivals at Aspen, Brevard, Berk-
shire, Chicago-land and the Pacific
Coast Festival at Santa Barbara.
Making appearance on broadway,
in the movies and on television,
Miss Russell has toured London,
Paris, Hawaii, Tasmania, Austra-
lia, New Zealand and Singapore,
as well as the ┬░United* States.
International Center
"Religion and Philosophy"
will- be the topic for informal
discussions at the International
Center from 7:30 to 9 p.m.
tonight. Refreshments will be
served. All students are invited
to attend the meeting.

Will

C-0-o-l Suits
C-o-o-l Savings
Summer's breeziest Suits reduced to
shadows of their former price early
enough to give you months of wear
from now through Indian Summer
and early fall.

..
.
1

JULY CLEARANCE

Were
16.95 to 29.95g
NOW'
8.98 to 14M9

" Pastels and
darks

Give

0

Rayon linens
Orion combi-
nations

Summer Concert

# Palm Beach
Broken
Sizes
9-15
10-20
12 '12to 24'

Anna Russell, Comedienne

The most effective means of reaching studen
and faculty of The University is the advertisir
columns of The Michigan Daily.

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If you are planning one, we sin-
cerely will enjoy helping you in
working out the details of your
printed needs.
We offer tasteful, beautiful wed-
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prnted, embossed, or engraved and
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ANNA RUSSELL
League Council
Sponsors Dance
Bridge Lessons
As the part of summer enter-
tainment for University students,
the League Council is sponsoring
bridge lessons, square and ball-
room dance classes and duplicate
bridge lessons, weekly.
Bridge lessons, to be held from
7:30 to 9 p.m. tonight, will be in-
structed by Dr. Shoenfield, who
will give attention to beginners
and advanced players both. The
cost of lessons is $3 for six sessions.
Room number will be posted.
Ballroom dance classes will be
held each Wednesday at 7 p.m.
for beginners and 8 p.m. for inter-
mediates, under the direction of
Mrs. Doris Martinak in the Hussey
Room of the League. Lessons are
priced at $3 for six for men, while
women are admitted free of charge.
The main attraction of Thurs-
day evenings is the duplicate
bridge session at 7:30 p.m., with
Mrs. Walter McLean. A whole
evening of bridge can be enjoyed
for only 50 cents per person. Stud-
ents are urged to take advantage
of these League-sponsored activi-
ties.
queen. A prince of the court covet-
ed the gem and killed the queen,
causing her blood to stain the
diamond, and thus the ruby was
born..
When cut cabochon, the ruby
sometimes shows a six-ray star,
similar to that of a star sapphire.
One of the characteristics of the
star ruby crystal is that whenever
it is cut, each part will still show
a star.
The most desired color for a
ruby is called "pigeon blood," a
bluish red, according to the Jewel-
ry Industry Council. Rubies of the
finest quality come frob Burma.
Other sources are Ceylon and
Siam.
The remainder of the month's
birthstone legends will be printed
in a future issue of The Daily.

ON FOREST
OFF SOUTH U.

all 100% wool.

Originally 39.95 to 69.95

now at reductions to one-Half

JULY CLEARANCE of
SPRING COATS and SUITS

LNOW

119

am~e Pringer3, Jnc.
PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS, STATIONERS
E. LIBERTY PHONE NO 8-7900

A LJ\_eLYiA@_.t.

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SPECIAL SELLING

SQcony Cielic

July
The ruby is July's birthstone,
warm glowing spark a traditic
symbol of deep contentment.
cause of its beauty and rarity,
ruby has always been given
highest value.
Known as the "Stone of R
alty," the stone was sought
kings and emperors for t
crowns and as love tokens for t]
princesses. Every large stone
came, automatically, the prop
of the ruler.
The origin of the ruby, acci
ing to ancient legend, tells c
Burmese Rajah who chose the n
perfect diamond as a gift for
superlative stag
I .
' A brae
new bra
3/4 cupe n
...Supple, p

y-put comfort in these
superlative strapless
BY HOLLYW00D-XAXWELL

;..

Clearan ce
OUR ENTIRE STOCK
OF SUMMER
CASUAL. SHOES
685
Orig. 8.95 to 11.95
Including Footwear by Famous
RED CROSS and JOYCE
TOWN and COUNTRY
White, pink, yellow, navy, red calfskin.
Nylon mesh and the popular Italian Raffia.
High or low wedge heels.

1)

Jersey Dre

sses

$ 895
Formerly to $14.95
Petite and Regular Sizes 10 to 20
NOT EVERY SIZE IN EVERY COLOR

nd
awith
derscored with
added wire so the

.. .

I

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