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July 13, 1954 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-07-13

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I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JULY13, 1954

TWO-DAY MEETING:
Speech Conference
N ~Set To Op--en Fridayv

"THE GUARDSMAN"-JULY 13 THRU 24:

04

Saline Mill Theatre Presents Plays

WILLIAM DOPPMAN, JORGE BOLErT
... Naumburg winners one generation apart

Speech science, pedagogy, tele-
vision and the theater-thiese are
just some of the topics scheduled
for discussion during the annual
Summer Speech Conference, Fri-
day and Saturday.
Sponsored by the Department of
Adorniments
On Exhibit
Tibetan ladies go overboard for
earrings, Chinese for symbolic
jewelry and the Filipinos weave
cloth from pineapple fibers-evi-
dence of such doings can currently
be found in the "Articles of Adorn-
ment" exhibit in the. Rackham
Gallery.
Presented in conjunction with
the summer program "Woman in
the World of Man," the display
will run through Saturday.
It was arranged from University
collections by Mrs. Kamer Aga-
Oglu, associated curator, Division
of the Orient of the Museum of
Anthropology.
The Tibetan belles seem to like
earrings, especially heavy ones,
As a matter of fact, one ancient
pair, silver inlayed with turquoise,
is so heavy it has achain worn
over the top of the head for sup-
port.
Practical Ornaments
The Tibetan gals of the past
went in for more practical orna-
ments, such as, one of silver, coral
and turquoise worn ont he shoulder.
Hanging from the ornament are
a toothpick, ear-spoon and set of
tweezers.
Also included in the display is
a Chinese necklace of openwork
ivory beads and glass.
These are connected with silk
cord, ornamented with "endless
knots," symbol of longevity.
Pineapple fiber woven into ma-
terial called "Pina" is seen in
scarves and a blouse in the ex-
hibit.
Another fabric sample is the Ta-
pa cloth from Polynesia. Made of
the inner bark of the paper mul-
berry tree, the material has a de-
sign stamped on it from wooden
blocks and painted bamboo sticks
dipped in vegetable dye.
Gallery hours are 2 to 10 p.m.
every day except Sunday.

Speech, the conference is open to
the public. All sessions will be held
in the Rackham Bldg.
Starting the two-day event off on
Friday will be a demonstration
debate on "Resolved: That the
Federal Government Should Initi-
ate a Policy of Free Trade Among
Nations Friendly to the United
States."
This will be followed by a talk
on "Technical Aids in Inter-Lingual
Communication" by L. E. Dostert,
director, Georgetown University
Institute of Languages and Lin-
guistics.
Closing the morning session will
be Prof. Eugene H. Bahn of the
Wayne University speech depart-
ment who will speak on "The Bas-
ic Nature of Oral Interpretation."
Detroit Education TV
That afternoon, Kathleen N. Lar-
die, director of radio and television
for the Detroit Public Schools,
will discuss "Education Television
in Detroit."
Next on the program will be
"Freedom of Speech and t h e
Speech Teacher." discussed, by
Prof. Waldo W. Braden of the
Louisiana State University speech
department.
That evening will be devoted to
a panel discussion on "Trends and
Opportunities in Speech Educa-
tion."
Participants will be: Prof. Brad-
en; Prof. Thomas A. Rousse, Uni-
versity of Texas speech depart-
ment chairman; Prof. Paul D. Bag-
well, chairman of the Michigan
State College Department of Com-
munication Skills; Prof. W. Nor-
wood Brigance, Wabash . College
Max Fuller, director of Field Edu-
cation, Maytag Company, Newton,
Ia.; Prof. Karl R. Wallace, Uni-
versity of Illinois speech depart-
ment chairman and president of
the Speech Association of America.
On Saturday the conference will
start off with a talk on "Problems
in Communication" by Fuller.
Prof. Brigance will then speak on
"On 'Appeal to Reason' and 'Ap-
peal to Emotion."
Next on the program will be B.
Iden Payne, guest drama director,
who will discuss "Shakespearean
Productions."
Closing the conference will be B.
luncheon in the Union. Speaker
will be Prof. Wallace who will
discuss "Rhetoric and Politics."

Pianists Bolet, Doppmann
Discuss Naumburg Awards,

Saline Mill Theatre, playhouse-in-the-round, will present Frank
Molnar's "The Guardsman" at 8:30 p.m. tonight through Saturday,
July 24, as the second in the summer season series of productions.
Tickets for the plays, which are priced at $1.65 for individual per-
formances and $5 for student membership for the entire season, may
be put on reservation by calling Saline 31 or writing to Box 205, Saline.
Saline Mill Theatre, "possibly the most beautiful and comfortable
summer playhouse in the country," according to J. Dorsey Callaghan
of the Detroit Free Press, dates back to 1935, when Henry Ford built the
Mill from the remains of an earlier wheat mill.
Constructed early in the period of the George Washington Carver
soybean experiments, the colonial architecture of the original mill
was preserved, even to retaining the foundation. Only electricity, steam
heat and modern plumbing were added.
During the years of its operation, Saline Mill produced such varied
items as soybean paint, Ford steering wheels, Illinois license plates,
cattle feed, industrial soybean oil and powdered plastics.
The crude processing building, cleared of machinery and ex-
tensively remodeled, is the present Saline Mill Theatre. The Mill
proper has been converted into an art gallery and living quarters
for the company.
Both buildings, which could have been designed for a theatre,
are finished in native rock and knotty pine-panelling and are nestled
in a natural valley just beyond the Mill dam near Saline's busines
district.
Center staging, or the true theatre-in-the-round, was ftwv1 bped
by a West Coast group at the University of Washington to p10v1de
audience seating on three or all sides of the playing stage,. lowerPw g;,
the cost of design and construction. The absence of walls also leod-
itself to flexibility in staging and scenery.
Business manager of the Saline Mill Theatre is the Rev. John
J. Hamel III, former assistant rector of St. Luke's Episcopal Church
in Ypsilanti. His sister, Barbara, is one of the original producers of
the theatre-in-the-round plays, and brought the idea to the Saline
Mill last summer.
Serving as actors-directors for the productions are Ted Heusel,
of the Ann Arbor Civic Theatre and a graduate of the University; and
Earl Matthews, of the speech department, now ,teaching in Detroit
high schools.
Florence and Gene Rupert, who will have the leads in "The
Guardsman," Nancy Born, Dorothy Patterson, Jim Schneider and
Gene Jankowski provide the talent for the main acting roles, while
subsidiary parts are played by Beverly Clevinger, Susan Goldberg and
Shirley Tepper.
Air director for the summer theatre is Charles Hoefler, a graduate,
of the University, and the house manager, "chief cook-and-bottle- .
washer," is Frances Charrier, Congregational theological student.
Future plays on the summer schedule include G. B. Shaw's "Can-
dida," July 27-August 7; Christopher Fry's "The Lady's Not for
Burning," August 10-21 and Thomas Job's "Uncle Harry," August
24-September 4. Performances each week run Tuesday through Sat-
urday.

FLORENCE RUPERT, CO-STARRING IN "THE GUARDSMAN,"
IS "MAKING-UP" FOR HER PART IN THE RECENT PRODUC-
TION, "PRIVATE LIVES."
DAILY PHOTO FEATURE

By DAVE TICE
Two gifted pianists, a generation
apart, and both winners of the
much sought-after Walter W.Naum-
burg award, met in Ann Arbor
yesterday.
One was the celebrated Cuban
pianist Jorge Bolet, and the other
was 19 year old William Doppmann
Jr., resident of Cincinnati, Ohio,
and a junior in the University
School of Music.
Describing himself as "an an-
cient Naumburg winner," Bolet re-
lated how his own musical career
has fared since his release from
the U. S. Army in 1946.
He spent three years in the
Army, first in the Infantry, then
in the Special Services during the
Japanese occupations.
His career as a pianist had just
begun when the war intervened,
and, as he said, "It's difficult to
pick up the pieces after an inter-
ruption of three years."
His success in "picking up the
pieces" may be ascertained from
the number of his engagements-
55 during the last year alone.
Goes to Germany
In addition, he and four other
young musicians were invited to
Germany several years ago for a
tour of the country, as guests of
the German Federal Government.
While there, the four performed
at a concert of the Berlin Phil-
harmonic Orchestra, and Bolet
wigl play at one of the New York
concerts of this orchestra during
its forthcoming American tour.
This year Bolet has recorded two
works of Prokofiev for Remington
Language Tallk
Set Thursday
Thursday Prof. Kenneth Milden-
berger of the Modern Language
Association will be on campus as
a special consultant for Teacher
of French and Spanish.
He will give an address on "The
Renaissance in Language Learn-
ing" at 3:30 p.m. in 439 M a s o n
Hall.
The lecture is open to the public
Without charge.
Prof. Mildenberger has achieved
stational renown for hs brilliant
fork in directing the Foreign Lan-
uage Program of the Modern
Languag gAssociation.hThis pro-
4 ram, backed by funds from the
I ockefeller Foundation, is a three-
ear study of the entire field of
.freign language teaching int he
United States,
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Coming Events
Kaffeestunde. A German conversation
oup will meet informally every wed-
nesday at 3:15 in the South Cafeteria
o the Michigan Union. All persons in-
t rested in speaking and hearing Ger-
n an are cordially invited to attend.
Russian Circle-Professor Grossman,
vsiting professor of economics from
t e University of California. will address
the Russian Circle in the International
Gnter at 8 p.m., Wednesday. July 14.

records: the Sonata No. 7, and
the Concerto No. 2 for Piano and
Orchestra, with the Cincinnati
Symphony Orchestra, Thor John-
son conducting.
Cincinnati Greatest Triumph
It was in Cincinnati, one and one
half years ago, that Bolet made
perhaps his greatest triumph.
After his performance of the
Rachmaninoff Concerto No. 3, the
usually apathetic Friday afternoon
audience gave him an ovation that
was described by old-timers as the
loudest and most prolonged they
had ever heard at the concerts.
Bolet admitted that he was al-
most unnerved by the newspaper
notices the next day, "which led
people to expect some super-colos-
sal Horowitz."
When the concert was repeated
the next day, Cincinnati's Music
\Hall was entirely sold out, and
the performance of the concerto
received the same ovation that it
had the previous day.
Bolet To Play Here
Ann Arbor will hear Bolet for
the second time (he appeared with
the Philadelphia Orchestra during
the 1952 May Festival here) on
November 15 of this year, at
which time he will give a solo re-
cital for the Choral Union concert
series.
Doppmann, a student of Benning
Dexter of the School of Music, was
one of the four winners of the
Naumburg award early this spring.
The purpose of the award is to
give young performing artists an
opportunity for a debut in New
York's - famed Town Hall.
In order to reduce the almost
astronomical number of applicants
for the highly competitive contest
(in a recent year there were 145
singers, in addition to instrumen-
talists), the amount of music each
contestant must be prepared to
perform was recently increased
from one to two 70 minute pro-
grams
Although no one actually has to
play the 140 minutes of music, the
choice of numbers is entirely up
to the judges, who may demand
to hear any of it.
In comparing notes, it was found
that despite the increased require-
ments Doppmann had to play on-
ly about half as much music as
Bolet did when the latter won the
Naumburg award in 1937.
Wehn asked how he took the news
that he had won, Doppmann re-
plied, "I had gone through so
much tension that when the re-
sults were announced I didn't feel
a thing. I was so dazed that I
wasn't elated or anything else. I
got over it, though."
Lecture Film
Series Slated
The lecture-film series program
sponsored by the School of Public
Health for the week of July 12,
will be Maternal and Child Health
and films covering dental health,
nutrition and maternal and child
health.
First of the series, all of which
will be presented at 4 p.m. in the
School of Public Health Auditorium,
is a film-discussion entitled "A
Well Child in Every Seat" Tuesday
July 13. Dr. Donald C. Smith will
c-onduct the discussion.
Thursday, July 15, a series of
films will be shown dealing with
the topics covered by speakers for
the last two weeks in dental health,
nutrition, and maternal and child

Pictures by

DUAN E POOLE

Story by SUE GARFIELD

4;

Calendar o Events
TODAY--
Harpsichord Concert
Harpsichordist Alice Ehlers will present the "Goldberg Varia-
tions" of Johann Sebastian Bach in a public concert at 8:30 p.m.
today in Rackham Lecture Hall.
Mrs. Ehlers is a lecturer in musicology in the School of Music
for the Summer Session. She will present a second concert in con-
junction with the "Woman in the World of Man" series orm August 2.
The Goldberg Variations consist of an Aria with thirty varia-
tions. The work was commissioned by the Russian Count Keyserling
for his house harpsichordist, Johann Gottlieb Goldberg, to be played
on the Count's many sleepless nights.
Soviet Discussions
Beginning today, there will be four seminars and public round-
table discussions on the trends in Soviet society with emphasis on de-
velopments since Stalin's death.
"Geographic Baese of Soviet Power" to be discussed under John
A. Morrison, former chief of the USSR division, Office of Strategic
Services, will be the first of the round table discussions which will
be held at 8 p.m. today in the West Conference Rm. of the Rackham
building.
"Soviet Internal Politics" will be discussed in the sessions sched-
uled for July 20 and 22. Thomas B. Larson of the Division for Research,
USSR, Department of State, will lead them. All the round table dis-
cussions are open to the public.
On Tuesdays and Thursdays seminars will be held at 3 p.m. In
Mason Hall. Both the seminars and discussions are part of the special
summer program in Russian studies.
TOMORROW-
Arabic Literature Talk
Tomorrow, Franz Rosenthal, a leading specialist in Semitic lan-
guages and Arabic literature will speak on "Arabic Wisdom Litera-
ture" at 4 p.m. in Auditorium B. Angell Hall.
Professor of Arabic at the University of Pennsylvania, Prof. Ros-
enthal will discuss "Arabic Historiography with Special Reference
to Ibn Kaldun" Friday at the same time and place.
The two lectures are a part of the current series presented by
the Near Eastern Studies department on "Studies in Near Eastern
Culture."
Speech Assembly
"Fact and Fancy" will be the subject of a public lecture by the
Rt. Reverend Thomas Bloomer, Lord Bishop of Carlisle, Stanwix,
Carlisle, Cumberland, England, at 3 p.m. tomorrow in the Rackham
Amphitheater, sponsored by the speech department.
Bishop Bloomer was appointed to his position in 1946 and was
recently admitted to the English House of Lords.
UNUSUAL GIFTS
for all occasionS
, INDIA ART SHOP
330 MAYNARD STREET
(Across from the Arcade)
rc--a F c oOc ~ o a o o(

.

I

A

maa a ae a a mm an a i w Na i a
NANCY BORN, UNIVERSITY GRADUATE AND LEADING ACT-
RESS AT SALINE, AS SEEN PLAYING "AMANDA PRYNNE"
IN "PRIVATE LIVES"

FLORENCE RUPERT, TED HEUSEL, GENE RUPERT AND
NANCY BORN IN A SCENE FROM NOEL COWARD'S PRO-
DUCTION, PLAYED ON THE THEATRE-IN-THE-ROUND
STAGE AT SALINE.

4

SALINE MILL THEATRE, PLAYHOUSE-IN-THE-ROUND, BUILT IN 1935, LOCATED ON U.S.
112 JUST OUTSIDE OF SALINE. PERFORMANCES ARE GIVEN EACH WEEK, TUESDAY THRU
SATURDAY. SINGLE ADMISSION IS $1.65.

-.41

-J,

- ~ ~Y

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