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July 02, 1954 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-07-02

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FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGETIMES

?AGE THREE

Wayne Grid

r

Giants Trim Dodgers Again;
Yankees Edge Red Sox, 8-7

Future Set;
Sport Stays
DETROIT (P) - The Detroit
Board of Education voted 4-3 yes-
terday to continue football at
Wayne University.
President Clarence Hilberry had
recommended that the sport be
abolished following the 1954 sea-
son.
Wayne lost $34,000 on football
in the 1953 season. Most of its re-
cent seasons have been losing
ones. The record last season was 3
won, 4 lost and 1 tied. It was
y 4-4-0 in 1952, 5-4-0 in 1951 and
2-7-0 in 1950.
The contract of football coach
Lou Zarza expires next April.
Four Month Study
Wayne's football future became
clouded last April when an ath-
letic study committee split 3-3 on
the question of continuing foot-
ball. Hilberry then presented it to
the University Council, which
voted 22-10 to abolish. This deci-
sion won endorsement from the
Council of Deans.
Hilberry next took the question
to the board of education, top
governing body of the university
and public schools.

Cardinals Trounce Milwaukee, but Lose
Services of Haddix, Struck by Line Drive

ac-

NEW YORK - Jim "Dusty"'
Rhodes, star pinch hitter, came
through in his specialty for the
second time in three days, banging
a bases-loaded single in the eighth
inning to snap a 2-2 tie and give
the New York Giants a 5-2 victory
yesterday for a sweep of the three-
game series with the Brooklyn
Dodgers.
It was the seventh straight vic-
tory for the Giants and stretched
their lead over the second-place
Dodgers to four games.
* * *
St. Louis 9, Milwaukee 2
MILWAUKEE-Rookie Joe Cun-
ningham and Stan Musial blasted
two home runs apiece yesterday
as the St. Louis Cardinals whipped
the Milwaukee Braves, 9-2, but
lost the services of ace lefthander
Harvey Haddix.
Haddix, top winner in the Na-
tional League with a 12-4 record,
was hit just below the kneecap by
a line drive off Joe Adcock's bat
in the fourth. X-rays showed he
suffered abrasions and contusions.

He was expected to be out of
tion about 10 days.

Cunningham, playing in his sec-
ond major league game after being
called up from the Card's Rochest-
er N.Y. farm Wednesday, got both
his homers off veteran lefthander
Warren Spahn in his first two
times at bat, driving in four runs.
He made his debut Wednesday
night at Cincinnati with his initial
homer and a single to bat in five
runs.
* * *
New York 8, Boston 7
BOSTON-Yankee home runs by
Mickey Mantle, Hank Bauer and
Andy Carey produced five runs
in the third inning yesterday and
the New Yorkers hung on to win
an 8-7 decision over the Boston
Red Sox.
Veteran righthander Allie Reyn-
olds, seeking his 10th straight vic-
tory, failed to get by the three-run
Red Sox' fourth inning but another
veteran, Johnny Sain, came on in
the seventh to receive credit for
the victory.
After Reynolds and Bob Grim
had been treated roughly for the
ever-threatening Red Sox for the
first six frames, Sain stifled Bos-
ton with only a single hit to gain
his fourth decision against two
losses.

Motor City
Golfers Led
By Douglas
DETROIT (A-Shrugging off a
2-stroke penalty, confident Dave
Douglas, a stringbean son of a
Scotch professionel, fired a 3-un-
der-par 68 on the slick greens of
the Meadowbrook Country Club
Thursday to take the first round
lead in the Motor City Open.
The lean, 36-year-old slugger
from Grossinger, N. Y., shot a
33-35-68 as most of the players in
the field of 157 had trouble with
the fast greens and tricky pin
placements. 5
Cary Middlecoff, in fact, became
so annoyed-with a putt on the fifth
green that he kicked and broke
his putter. Prohibited to use an-
other putter, the Memphis, Tenn.,
dentist putted the final 13 holes
with almost every club in his bag-
driver, one-iron, sand wedge, and
skidded to a one-over-par 72.
Douglas birdied four holes over
the par 35-36-71, 6,701-yard Mead-
owbrook layout. It gave him a
one-stroke lead over three veter-
ans-Johnny Palmer of Charlotte,
N.C.; George Fazio of Pine Val-
Kocsis of Royal Oak, Mich.
Tommy Bolt, a pre-tournament
favorite from Houston, Tex., shot
a one-over 72 and Gene Littler,
national amateur king from Palm
Springs, Calif., matched par with
a 71.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Gold ring with black and white
cameo, inscription inside. Reward-
please bring to University Lost and
Found. )171A
FOR SALE
1940 LaSALLE with V-8 Cadillac motor
in very good condition. Radio, heater,
good tires. Complete car for $75, motor
$50. Mechanics special. NO 2-9020.
)556B
1947 DODGE MOTOR in A-1 condi-
tion, $50; also 1947 Dodge radio $10.
Phone NO 2-9020. )557B
CONN-ALTO SAX, gold lacquer, good
condition, cheap. Also fine Pedler
clarinet, excellent condition. Must
sell. Call Diane or Russ AuWerter at
NO 2-0652 or NO 2-3241. )555B
HERB ESTES
4th of July
SPEC IALS
1947 NASH Sedan with radio, heater,
overdrive.......................$175
1949 FORD-Custom V-8 2-door. Radio
and heater, Special at .......... $445
1949 PACKARD-4-door. Sedan with ex-
ceptionally nice finish. Special for
the 4th ..........................$445
1941 CHEVROLET Club Coupe with radio
and heater ........................$95
1949 FORD-2-door, light grey finish.
Radio and heater.................$425
1937 De SOTO, good runner. 4-door ..
.. ...... ......... $75
1948 FORD-2-door Club Coupe. Radio
and heater ......................$245
YOUR FORD DEALER
503 E. Huron NO 2-3261
)554B
1951 CHEVROLET FLEETLINE-And a
1946 Buick Super with four new tires,
Both with radio and heater. Phone
NO 2-1793. ) 551B
The most effective means of1
reaching students and faculty of
The University is the advertising
columns of The Michigan Daily.

MMIACL

FOR SALE
CONTAX III A, brand new, sonnar 1.5
lens, built in light meter. Feet and
inches, case, filters. Make me an offer.
Must sell. Bill Koff at NO 3-3605 or
NO 3-1511, ext. 2820. )552B
1946 OLDSMOBILE, Club Coupe, radio
heater, hydramatic, one owner. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. ) 549B
1947 WILLYS Station Wagon, recently
overhauled, good rubber. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)550B
SPECIAL SELLING short sleeve wash-
able sport shirts, $1.59, 2 for $3.
Leisure slacks, $2.99 up. Sam's Store,
122 E. Washington. )546B
1950 STUDEBAKER-Champion, radio,
heater, over-drive. Huron Motor Sales.
222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588. )543B
Purchase from
*Purchase
CIRO 35 35mm camera. F 3.5 lens with
case and flash-used $40.00.
Purchase Camera
NO 8-6987 1116 S. University
)534B
1951 CHEVROLET-station wagon, low
mileage, radio heater new tires.
Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Washing-
ton. NO 2-4588. )542B
1947 MERCURY-4 door, radio, heater,
new tires, one owner, sharp. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )541B
TANK CLEANER, 3 years old, $25. Also
GE Ironer, 20. Both excellent condi-
tion, 836 So. Main St.

FOR RENT
DOUBLE ROOMS for business girls,
nurses, grad. students. Near campus
clean. Phone NO 2-1486. )94C
OPPOSITE CAMPUS, small modern
apartment for professional man, Frigi-
daire. Phone Mrs. Stewart NO 8-8744
or Mrs. Atkins NO 5-2882. )87C
ROOMS FOR RENT
SUMMER RENTALS POOR. Name your
rent. Apartment or rooms. Refrig-
erator privileges. Close to campus.
906 Greenwood. Call Stu in Detroit
at WO 1-5505 or UN 2-3972. 1001D
COOPERATIVES OFFER-best living
and eating. Room and board $12 week.
Board only $8 per week. 6 houses for
men and women. Apply at 1017 Oak-
land or call NO 2-3219. )99D
THREE LARGE ROOMS for male stu-
dents for summer. Single or double.
940 Greenwood. NO 8-9531. )97D
BEAUTIFUL CAMPUS LOCATION. Sin-
gle and double rooms; only $5 per
week. 1001 S. Forest NO 2-7639. )90D
PERSONAL
WHAT'LL YOU HAVE? A daily paper
(7c)-or Time, Newsweek (6c)? Stu-
dent Periodical, NO 2-3061. )124F
MARRIED GIRL with car to do baby
sitting evenings. Call Sandra Silver
at Hamilton 6-3109 after 6 p.m. ) 125F
VOICE LESSONS: call David Murray,
Grad. voice major. Phone NO 2-7306.
)114F

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING. Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet wash-
ing. Also ironing separately. Free
pick-up and delivery. Phone NO
2-9020. Specialize in cotton dresses.
)581
WEBCOR
3 Speaker Musicale
The first truly hi-fidelity table model
phonograph. Hear it and
compare it at
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
"Student Service"
1217 S. University Ph. NO 8-7942
112 blocks east of East Eng. )571
HELP WANTED
PART-TIME Service Station man. 300
N. Main. Opposite Post Office. )118H
SITUATION WANTED
UNIVERSITY STUDENT'S WIFE-Needs
work for the summer. Experienced 1im
general office work and child care.
References. Call NO 3-3995. 2P
A YOUNG MAN available now, desires
work washing and polishing cars.
Odd jobs, etc. Experienced. Phone NO
2-9020. )3P
STUDENT'S WIFE needs summer em-
ployment. Nursery school, governess,
general office experience. Call NO
2-5863. )4P

by jack horwitz
An era ends today.
An era which saw the rise of a small agricultural college into
one of the largest universities in the nation and with it the rise
of a now famous sports program.
Today saw the retirement of one of the state's, even the country's,
most renown sports figures. Yes, after 40 years, rotund, smiling Ralph
Young steps down from his post as Athletic Director of Michigan
' State College. The college, of which he is an integral part, will long
miss its "genius of the sports world." Young is taking, a one-year
terminal leave and then will retire permanently from the Spartan
sports scene.
His retirement was quiet and very uneventful, as he wanted
it to be. There were no final speeches, no final farewells; all of this
was taken care of over the past few months, after he had announced
his intent to depart. The farewell banquets, the good wishes of all
the sports figures, and the many cards and letters and telegrams were
given and received throughout the past weeks.
His College Grew
Young saw his college grow. He saw it grow from the small
agricultural school of 2,035 students in 1923 to the great sports giant
it is today. He saw the campus built and with it its athletic plant.
When he arrived, there was no intramural athletic program to speak
of. Over the years, he formed one of the most well-rounded and in-
clusive programs for student competition in the country. It is com-
parable to the one here at Michigan, set up by Earl Riskey.
Sports are his life and he has set an impressive record on the
national sports scene. From his accomplishments in the world of
runners to his gridiron magic, he will be long remembered. In the
point of service, Young is the oldest athletic director of all the
7 mid-western colleges and universities. He is one of the few football
players to have played under both Amos Alonzo Stagg and Fielding H.
Yost. Young played two years at the University of Chicago under
Stagg. He then transferred to Washington and Jefferson where he
received his diploma in 1915. He entered the signal corps after grad-
uation and, in 1918, while training at Michigan, he became a tackle
under Yost.
Final Season His Best
In the track world, his feats are numerous. He was associate
track coach of the United States Olympic team in 1932. For many
years he was a member of the National AAU Track and Field com-
mittee and is a past president of the Michigan AAU. He founded the
NCAA cross-country championship meet. In 1926, he, along with Knute
Rockne of Notre Dame and Conrad Jennings of Marquette, founded
the Central College Conference to promote track and field athletics
and cross-country among mid-western colleges. The 3-C meets are
exceeded in size only by the National Collegiate meets.
Young came to Michigan State in 1923 after transfering from
Kalamazoo College. He was to be the coach of all the sports played
at the school. He served as head football coach for five years, but
the pressure brought on by an enlarged physical education program
developed under his guidance, forced him to yield not only his foot-
ball job, but basketball, cross-country, and track. He then took on his
present position as athletic director.
Young's many other accomplishments are far too numerous to
mention. His work with the Olympics produced much notice when,
in 1952, as chairman of the NCAA Olympic finance committee, he
produced a record contribution to the Olympic fund. He is currently
a member of the U. S. Olympic track and field committee. Young was
also appointed to the NCAA boxing rules committee.
Young's last year at Michigan State was the greatest season in
the schools sports history. The Spartans years of building produced

1

._.,.

Major League Standings

Ad .1

k

FOR RENT

erfetiaioz in. mcde rn Gooz

AMERICAN LEAGUE

<-I

W
Cleveland ..48
Chicago ....46
New York ..46
Detroit .....31
Washington 29
Philadelphia 27
Baltimore . .27
Boston......25

L
22
26
27
37
40
44
44
43

Pet.
.686
.639
.630
.456
.420
.406
.380
.368

GB
3
3%
16
181/2
19%
21%
22

NATIONAL
W
New York ...48
Brooklyn . .344
Philadelphia 37
Milwaukee .34
Cincinnati ..34
St. Louis ...34
Chicago . .. .24
Pittsburgh .23

LEAGUE
L Pct.
23 .676
27 .620
30 .552
35 .493
36 .486
36 .486
43 .358
48 .324

GB
4
9
13
13%
13%
22
25

GAMES TODAY
Chicago at Cleveland (2), twi-
night - Trucks, (10-4) and
Wynn, (8-6).
Johnson, (4-3) vs. Feller, (4-1)
and Wynn, (8-6).
Washington at New York (2)
-Stone, (6-1) and Schmitz,
Ford, (6-5).
Detroit at Baltimore, night-
Aber, (1-1) vs. Coleman, (8-6).
Philadelphia at Boston (night)
Trice, (7-5) vs. Brewer, (3-4).

GAMES TODAY
New York at Pittsburgh (night)
-Monzant, (0-0) vs. Friend,
(3-5).
Brooklyn at Philadelphia
night-Wojey (0-0) vs. Sim-
mons, (7-6).
St. Louis at Chicago-Raschi,
(6-3) vs. Pollet, (3-4).
Cincinnati at Milwaukee (2),
twi-night-Valentine, (7-6) and
Podbielan, (5-3 vs. Nichols, 4-6)
and Conley, 5-3.

COOL AND QUIET-2-room basement
apartment, private bath and en-
trance, laundry privileges. West side.
$60. Call NO 3-5287 after 4 p.m. )95C
BY DAY OR WEEK-furnished 1 and 2
bedroom campus apartments. Rooms.
Families welcome. Campus Tourist
Homes. 518 E. Williams. NO 3-8454,
(near State), )92C
MICHIGAN'S
ULTRA MODERN
SHOP
AIR CONDITIONED
6 BARBERS
Special Attention Given
Ladies' & Children's Hair Cutting
U of1M BARBERS
'715 N. University
T.V. For Your Enjoyment

DON

Jtrting S aturday
SC EEN tN*KEA WN ANKLY
.Thri thng . . . gripping . . . can
t very proudy ao-sde Ba
tleground' and 'Thirty Seconds?:
Over Tokyo'!" -Bosley Crother..
--N. Y. Times.

ENDING TODAY
NA REED ROCK HUDSON
"GUN FURY"
IN TECHNICOLOR

-----

INTRAMURAL SOFTBALL RESULTS
Greene 20, Hayden 3 Phi Delta Phi 30, Phi Lambda
Phi ,
Hinsdale 10, Strauss 1 Alpha Kappa Psi 18, Acacia 6
ANN ARBOR'S MOST LISTENED-TO ORCHESTRA
OPEN JULY 5

IN THRILLS!

..:,

The Rainbow Combo You must be 21.
Featuring V.J.AI Members
loyely Mary Lou ' LW ].nd Guests only.

,

HALL

RENTALS & BANQUETS___

CnRa SL qd
PRESENTS

ja$G IN SUSPENSE f;STEREOPHONICSOU
D EXCITEMENT. RNC4

I

one of the finest football teams
TODAY!j
Strange Adventures of
Yankee who ruled
Forbidden Morocco!!
C EATURE

in the country, taking the Big Ten
--+ Championship and going on to win
a gridiron dream, the Rose Bowl
game on New Year's day. In addi-
tion, the Green and White cap-
tured the Western Conference
baseball crown.
Yes, an era ends today, but an-
other one begins. Young turns over
his athletic directorship to Clar-
ence "Biggie" Bunn. The Young
era has been a fruitful one for the
East Lansing school. The question
now remains, will the Munn era
meet the standards set by the
"genius of sports?"

THE SNOWS
OF KILIMANJARO
with
GREGORY PECK
SUSAN HAYWARD
AVA GARDNER
Friday at 7:00and 9:15

3

BOSTON (AP)-Quotable quotes:
Walter K. O'Malley, president of
the Brooklyn Dodgers, discussing
the value of Dodger centerfielder
Duke Snider: "I'd trade a couple
of vice-presidents, even O'Malley
himself, before I'd trade Duke
Snider."

12 O'CLOCK HIGH
with
GREGORY PECK
DEAN JAGGER

Wni
Att

ks and
honor

I

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I

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