100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 11, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

U

It's the Same Old Story:
Bantam Ben Takes Oper

CLASSIFIEDS

* * *

Record Last Round 68 Gives
Texan 72-Hole Score of 282
Par Out 444 445 434-36
Hogan Out 444 434 434-34
Par In 444 344 445-36-72
Hogan In 444 254 344-34-68
(73-71-70-68-282)
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland, July 10-(P)--Ben Hogan, golf's living
legend, won the British Open championship on his first try today,
shooting a record 68 on the last round for a 72-hole score of 282.
4He had rounds of 73-71-70-68. His total was the second lowest
in the tourney's history.
THE WIRY TEXAN won with a fantastic finish such as has
marked his many triumphs in America.
Starting the day two strokes back of Britons Eric Brown and
Dai Rees, he collared the field with a morning round of 70 and
then came home with a parade of birdies, as his international
foes faded.
He finished four strokes .ahead of Amateur Frank Stranahan of
Toledo, O.; Dai Rees, diminutive Welshman; Australia's Peter Thom-
son, runnerup to Bobby Locke last year, and Antonio Cerdos, of
.Argentina.
IN HIS TRIUMPH, Hogan completed a 1953 grand slam com-
parable to the four-tournament sweep by Atlanta's Bob Jones, who
won the British amateur and open and the U. S. amateur and open
in 1930.
He won the Masters tournament this spring at Augusta, Ga.,
with a record score and then captured lis fourth U. S. open at
Oakmont, thus tying the winning records of Willie Anderson and
Jones.
On his last round, Hogan rang in four birdies, one of them a 35-
foot chip shot from off the green on the par four fifth.
PLAYING GRIMLY and mechanically, smoking cigarete chain-
fashion, the Texas shotmaker also had birdies on the sixth, thirteenth
and eighteenth.
On the par five 567-yard sixth, the Texan walloped a drive
300 yards down the middyp. His approach fell 80 yards from the
pin. He chopped within three feet of the hole and sank the putt.
This was one of his great holes of the day. He was driving with
amazing power throughout the round.
* * * *
ON THE 167-YARD thirteenth, Hogan laid his tee shot 12 feet
from the pin and he calmly canned it for his birdie deuce. With a
huge, milling crowd of more than 15,000 looking on, Hogan finished
dramatically on the 503-yard par five eighteenth hole.
He reached the green with his second shot and two-putted
from 35 feet.
Towards the end of his 36 holes today, the determined Texan
showed definite signs of strain. He was limping noticeably down the
seventeenth and eighteenth fairways.
HE WAS VERY pale under his tan when he walked off the last
green. With a wan smile on his face, Hogan repeated "I feel good, but
so very tired.
His last round 68 broke the Carnoustie course record of 69,
set 20 years ago by Horton Smith and tied during this tournament
by Argentina's Antonio Cerda and Frank Stranahan.

BEN HOGAN'
. . . fantastic finish
. , ,
Ben's Triumph
Is Fifth in Six
1953 Outings
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland-(IP)-
Ben Hogan's victory in the British
Open golf championship yester-
day was his fifth triumph in six
major tournaments this year.
His only defeat was in the
Greenbrier Open at White Sulphur
Springs, W. Va., when he finished
in a tie for third. Sammy Snead
won that tournament.
** *
HOGAN'S other victories this
year:
April 12, won his second Mas-
ters tournament at Augusta,
Ga., with a tourney record
score of 274, five strokes under
the old mark.
May 3, won the Pan-American
Open at Mexico City witi 286.
May 24, won the Colonial In-
vitation tournament at Ft.
Worth with 282.
June 13, won his fourth U. S.
Open championship at Oakmont,
Pa., with course record score of
283. Old competitive record was
294.

Scotch Fans
Laud Hogan
As 'Ice Mon'
NEW YORK-(P)-When golf-
ers discuss Ben Hogan, the ques-
tion they ask most is: "Is he hu-
man?"
Many of them are convinced he
isn't. They gave up long ago try-
ing to win tournaments in which
"The Little Man" is entered.
* * *
THEY CALL him "The Little
Man" with respect and awe. The
Scots at Carnoustie, who watched
him win the British Open yester-
day on his first try, have their
own name for him: "The wee ice
mon."
"He's the only golfer in the
world I'm scared of," once said
Lloyd Mangrum.
On the golf course, Hogan re-
minds you of a tailor weaving a
dark cloak of defeat for his vic-
tims.
* * *
HE IS TRIM and tight-lipped.
He never sees anything or any-
body, they say, except the fair-
way and the pin. You can almost
see the wheels grinding away in
his head as he makes shot after
shot with unbelievable precision.
He is a chain-smoker. He
puffs away perpetually on a cig-
arette held in an incongruous
black holder. When he hits, he
gives the holder to his caddy to
hold. He drops half-smoked
butts-along with birdie putts--
on almost every green.
"Golf," said Hogan after win-
ning the Masters this spring with
a record score of 274, "is 20 per
cent skill and 80 per cent man-
agement."
WHAT DISTINGUISHES Hogan
from other golfers of the era? A
won't-be-licked spirit and , un-
matched concentration.
In 1949, he was almost killed
in an automobile-bus accident
which left his legs badly maimed.
Some said then he might never
walk again, much less play.
But a year later he came back.
Playing on battered legs which
had to be strapped up at night,
he won his second National Open
in 1950. Then in the spring of
1951 he won the Masters, and later
the Open again.
THERE ARE some who have
found Hogan cold. He isn't at all.
He is one of the necest and most
considerate of all tournament golf-
ers. He never "blows off," as the
expression goes.
Perhaps he was a bit hard to
approach or understand before
his near-fatal automobile acci-
dent.
If so, it might have been attri-
butable to his rough early life.
He' and his brother quit school as
children to support a fatherless
family. He found life hard, and he
met it the same way.

TIPS HIS CAP-Bantam Ben Hogan, comeback hero of the golf-
ing world, thanks a cheering throng at Carnoutsie, Scotland, after
garnering his initial British Open Title. He had to shoot four be-
low par to beat Toledo's Frank Stranahan, who got a 69 on his
final round.
SORE FLIPPER?
Branca, Dodger Right Hander,
Comes to .Detroit on Waivers

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DRYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
FOR SALE
PARAKEETS $6 and $8. Canaries--fe-
males and undetermined sex $1.95.
Singers $7.95 and up. Mrs. Ruffins,
562 S. Seventh.
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39.
Skip-dents, sanforized, whites and
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington St.
SMALL walnut gateleg table $40. One
large oak sideboard $5.00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. One up-
holstered chair $1.75. One large wal-
nut veneer table and five chairs $25.
One, wool rug $75. One metal doll
house, partially furnished, $5. Two
large walnut veneer buffets, $15 each.
One small folding steel cot $10.00.
Large davenport with green leather-
ette, $15. Phone 2-9020.
PORTABLE Record Player - 3-speed,
manual, $30. Phil Kearney, 2-6674
after 6
SOLID Baby Carriage with mattress.
Reasonable. Phone 2-8262.
RETURNING HOME-Must sell '47 Nash.
good condition. New tires. Call at 614
Monroe, back apt.
FOR RENT
APARTMENTS, roomettes, or rooms by
dlay or week for campus visitors.
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E. Wil-
liam St. Phone 3-8454.
ROOMS FOR RENT
ONE-HALF of large double with lava-
tory and bowl. One large single.
Phone 2-1465, 923 Olivia Ave.

TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS NEEDED-Share expenses to
New Jersey. Leave July 17. Louis
Lavine, Rm. 212, Union.
PERSONAL
WANTED-Tutor for marketing course.
Call 2-4591, 114 Greene House between.
6:30-7:30 p.m.
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Taxi cab drivers, full or part
time. Yellow and Checker Cab Co.
113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.
BUSINESS SERVICES
RA DIOS PHONOS
New and used and all guaranteed.
Phono needles - portable batteries,
We repair all types of radios, phonos,
and T. V.
Summer Special
Phono Jack and switch installed free
in your radio with purchase of V.M.
Triomatic Changer Attachment.
ANN ARBOR RADIO &r TV
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1s blocks east of East Eng.
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
HOME TYPING SERVICE-Reasonable
rates. Call Mrs. Conner, 2-7605.
EXPERT TYPIST -- Rates reasonable.
Prompt service. 914 Mary Street.
3-4449.
TYPING -- Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.,
MISCELLANEOUS
IS YOUR TIME worth 6? Subscribe
now, $3 a year. Phone 6007, Student
Periodical Agency.
ALTERATIONS ladies garments. Prompt
service. Ph. 2-2678 mornings if possible.
BOOKS
HCLAEBLAB

DETROIT - (A) - The Detroit
Tigers yesterday took another step
in rebuilding their mound staff
with the purchase, via the waiver
route, of veteran Brooklyn Dodger
hurler Ralph T. Branca.
The 27 year old right-hander
will join the Tigers here today.
Branca, a six-foot-three inch hurl-
er, broke into organized baseball
in 1943. He made a brief appear-
ance with the Dodgers in 1944 be-
fore being farmed out.
IN HIS FIRST full year with the
Dodgers in 1945, Branca posted a
5-6 record. His best year with the
Dodgers was 1947 when he won 21
games and lost 12.
Branca has appeared in seven
games this year for the National
League leaders without being
credited with either a win or a
loss.
His lifetime record stands at 80
wins and 58 losses. The veteran
Dodger moundsman has an earned
run average of 3:66 over his nine
year National League career.
* ,,.m *

TIGER front-office spokesmen
said Branca's purchase brings the
Bengal playing roster to the 25-
player limit set by the American
League.
The Dodgers were reported to
have been forced to place Branca
on the waiver list because his
wife, Ann, inherited stock in the
Brooklyn club.
Under National League rules, no
player may own stock in the club
for which he plays.

I

MMM

Z,

PORTERFIELD TAKES LOSS:
Yank Circuit Smashes Batter Nats, 6-1

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Irv Noren, Don
Bollweg and Yogi Berra hit home
runs to knock out BZob Porterfield
yesterday as the New York Yan-
kees downed Washington, 6-1, for
Eddie Lopat's ninth victory.
Porterfield, who blanked' the
Yanks Sunday, simply didn't have

GOLFERS
Have fun at the
Partridge Practice Range
We furnish clubs and balls
-212 miles out Washte-
now -right on U.S., 23
for 1 mile.
OPEN EVERY DAY
10A.M. - 11 P.M.

it. Ht was wild and when he got
it over, the Yanks hit it into the
seats.
* * *
A WALK TO Hank Bauer and a
single by Lopat with two out set
the scene for Noren's three-run
homer in the second. Porterfield
had two strikes on Noren, a for-
mer Washington outfielder, before
he hit it into the right field
stands. Bob threw down his glove
in disgust.
Bollweg led off the third with
his homer and Berra smashed
his after Mickey Mantle walked.
Porterfield steadied to retire
the next two men but, after he
walked Phil Rizzuto, Manager
Bucky Harris called in left-
handed Al Sima.
Washington scored its only run
in the first.
Although the Yanks held a com-
Late Show at 11:00 P.M.
NOW!

fortable five-run lead, Manager
Casey Stengel lifted Lopat for a
pinch hitter with a man on sec-
ond and two out in the eighth.
Allie Reynolds, making his 24th
appearance, finished up. The line
score:
Washington 100 000 000-1 10 0
New York ..330 000 00x-6 8 2
Porterfield, Sima (3), Lane (8)
and Fitzgerald; Lopat, Reynolds
(9) and Berra.
W-Lopat; L-Porterfield.
HRS. New York-Noren, Boll-
weg, Berra.
* * *
CUBS ON BLOCK
CHICAGO-Owner P. K. Wrig-
ley said yesterday he might sell
his Chicago Cubs in the wake of
an announced offer to purchase
the club by a group of Chicago
businessmen reportedly having five
million dollar backing.
Wrigley said a "Chicago Ameri-
can" story yesterday was the first
he knew of the offer made by a
Chicago attorney, Bailey Stanton,
who Thursday told Cub business
manager James T. Gallagher he
represented a half-dozen interest-
ed Chicagoans.

RALPH BRANCA
. trades uniforms

NOW PLAYING ON THE

"BELL,
BOOK
AND
CANDLE"

DRAMARAMA
Stave at
SALINE MILL
THEATRE
Route 112, Just Ten
Minutes from Ann Arbor
Guest Admission
$1.80
Season Membership
(4 Plays)
$6.00
Call Saline 31

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "When I am weak, then am I strong,"
3rd in summer series on 'Paradoxes in Chris-
tianity."
Sunday at 6:00: Lutheran Student Club (Gamma
Delta). Supper and Program, with talk by Mr.
Robert Clausen of Adrian, "Stagy Evangelism."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
William S. Baker, University Pastor
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship.
"The Error of the Open Mind."
Dr. Baker, preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Summer Student Fellowship will meet
at the Church for a picnic supper. Prof. How-
ard McClusky will discuss the Christian Im-
perative in Family Life.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
10:00 A.M.: Student Bible Class studies "Proverbs"
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship. Sermon topic "The
Love of God."
7:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Student Guild: Miss
Ferne Woodward will report on The National
Baptist Student Association at Green Lake,
Wisconsin.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:30 A.M.: Bible Study.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service - Sermon by Dr.
Yoder, "Nice People or New Men."
7:00 P.M.: "Public Education and Religion:"--
Dr, Gerhard Lenski, Dept. of Sociology.
Tuesday-7:30 P.M.: Study of World's Great
Literature.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: "Shut In By The Lord."
7:30 P.M.: "He Was Transfigured Before Them."
7:45 Wednesday: Prayer Meeting.
A film of Korea, "The Flame" will be shown.
A Friendly Church where the Word is preached.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8:00 A.M., 10:00 A.M., 11:30 A.M.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Father Richard Center.

8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Comment
10:00 A.M.: Student Breakfast, Lounge of Pa
House.
11:00 A.M.: Church School (thru 6th grade)
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship.
6:00 P.M.: Student Buffet Supper and Spea
Lounge.
8:00 P.M.: Evensong, St. Michael's Chapel.

ory.
rish
ker,

I

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Sermon by Rev.
Theodore Smale, "The Purpose of Preaching."
11:30 A.M.: Broadcast over WHRV.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Informal Discussion group, Pine
Room. Topic, "'The Christian Student and The
World Struggle."
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship, "The Great Prayer
of Our Century" Dr. Large, preaching
3:00'P.M.: Meet in Wesley Lounge for Outdoor
Picnic meeting. Swimming, volley-ball and
picnic supper. Vesper worship service. All
students are welcome.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine

t o, ER- N N T
4V4wase

I

8:30
EVERY NIGHT
BUT MONDAY
THROUGH JULY 19

During the Week:
Wednesday, 7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion; Friday,
12:10 P.M.: Holy Communion; Friday 4:00-
6:00 P.M.: Student Tea in Lounge of Parish
House.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING Lane Hall
11:00 A.M. Sundays. Visitors welcome.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
July 12-Sacrament
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: TestimonialbService.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South,
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read bor-
rowed. or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.

I

I * - WF - I - I W . ll

i

I

ENDING TONIGHT
"Two Flags West"
with
Linda Darnell, Cornell Wilde
and Joseph Cotten
and
"The Toughest
Mon in Arizono"
with
VAUGHN MONROE
In Technicolor

I

OheiaS L quild
COMPLETE NEW SHOW
TONIGHT at 6:30 -- 8:00 -- 9:30 P.M.
SUNDAY at 8:00 P.M. Only
AN ANN ARBOR PREMIERE
J. Arthur Rank presents
ALEC GNU I 1wNESS
"gives a superb comic performance . . . in a contagiously funny
picture. Its light-hearted gayety is genuine and universal. A
first-class comedy designed to give the customers a run for their
money." - N. Y. Times.
WITH A SPLENDID CAST IN
11 9 U EL .w . __1 wU\ k A L - I

i,
'

SUNDAY
First Exclusive
Showing in This Area
"TLI" CTAt'n.E"

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y.M.C.A. Auditorium
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Thursdays: 7:30 P.M , Bible Study.
G. Wheer Utley, Minister,
Hear: "The Herald of Truth."
WXYZ-ABC Network

AFff rl r ULL-LENGTHJrI N%,

I I

I

RAMS LUVL!

I

I

III

I

11

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan