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July 10, 1953 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-10

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i

FRIDAY, JULY 10, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY , PAGEHREE

r

Hogan, Stranahan Two Strokes
Off Slow Pace in British Open

scoreboard
. ..by Dick Lewis

[CLASSIFIE DS

* s * *

a

CARNOUSTIE, Scotland -- (A')
-- Ten great golfers were bunched
within four strokes last night at
the head of the pack as a ruthless
scramble developed for the prized
British Open golf championship.
Dai Rees and Eric Brown, two
Britons, led with142's, two strokes
ahead of Ben Hogan, pride of the
United States, and Frank Strana-
han, the Toledo,amateur.
* * *
HOGAN ADDED a 71 to his 73
of Wednesday for 144, while Stran-
ahan slipped from 70 to 74 for the
same total. Peter Thompson of
Australia was tied with the two
Americans, while between these
three and the leaders was the
powerful Argentine star, Robert
de Vincenzo, with 143.
The final 36 holes of the 72-
hole tournament over Carnous-

'i

"{.

1E 1
Starting Today
"TWO FLAGS
WEST'
with
LINDA DARNELL,
CORNELL WILDE,
and JOSEPH COTTEN
and
"The Toughest
Man in
Arizona"~
with
Vaughn Monroe
In Technicolor
8:40 and 10:40

tie's tough, windy, wet course
will be played today with the
field cut down from 91 to 49.
A score of 154 was needed to
qualify for the finals.
The tournament billed as Ho-
gan's own became anyone's prize--
but the little Texan, famed for his
fighting finishes, might well have
been out in front if his putts had
not been missing by inches and
fractions thereof. This is the first
attempt to add the British title
to his long list of American vic-
tories.
* * *
BOBBY LOCIE, the South Af-
rican who is defending champion,
is in contention with 72-73-145,
tied with Max Faulkner of Eng-
land, 74-71-145, and T. H. T.
Fairbair, also of England, also 74-
71-145. Antonio Cerda of Argenti-
na had 75-71-146.
Rees, a Welshman, shot a 70,
best score of the day, to put with
his 72 of Wednesday. Brown, an
unemployed professional golf-
er from Scotland, did 71, the
same as his score Wednesday.
There is no official par for this,
tough course, but unofficially 72
is considered standard.
LLOYD MANGDRUM of Los An-
geles and Niles, Ill., was buried
back in the pack with 75-76-151,
but he qualified for the last 36
holes.
The fourth American in the
tournament, D. W. Fairfield of
Jacksonvill, Ill., shot a 79 to go
with his 82 Wednesday and the
161 failed to qualify him for the
finals.
The low 50 players after yester-
day's round qualified to battle it
out in today's 36-hole finals.
Hogan, playing in his first Brit-
ish Open, said he was well satis-
fled after completing his round.
"I'd feel real good about it if I
was just putting a little better."
IM SCORES
SOFTBALL
Chemistry B 17, Wolverines 7
Digits 7, Pharmacy 5
Economics 15, WRRC Jokers 0
Chemistry A 6, Social Psy-
chology 4
BASKETBALL
Phi Delta Phi 43, 7 Pros 33
Rebels 40, Wolverines 37

I

TIME OUT-Ben Hogan, U.S. Open Champ, shakes hands with a
friend he recognized in the crowd at the sixth hole while
qualifying for the British Open Championships in Scotland.
After yesterday's play, Bantam Ben remained two strokes behind
the leaders.

SWEDISH OLYMPIC shotputter Roland (Fritz) Nilsson is tem-
porarily discarding the 16-pound iron ball for a permanent matri-
monial ball and chain. The 28-year-old Michigan field events star
will take time out from his athletic pursuits this fall to marry Barbara
Henderson, 22, of Alton, Illinois.
Nilsson, winner of the 1953 Big Ten indoor and outdoor shotput
and discus crowns, in the meantime is spending the summer working
beneath the hot Texas sun and revelling in his greatest campaign
since coming to America from Svano, Sweden. The 6-4 muscle-man
reached his greatest heights in the outdoor season recently concluded
by putting the shot 55 feet, 9% inches at the Penn Relays in April
to fall only three inches short of the meet record held by former
Michigan record-holder Charley Fonville.
In the same Penn Relays held early in Philadelphia, the
newly-elected Wolverine track captain hurled the discus, generally
regarded as his sideline, a record distance of 174 feet, 3% inches
--bettering the meet standard by four feet. Both heaves by Nilsson
were the best of his headline career. The record-breaking discus
toss also gave the blond junior the all-time University of Michigan
mark. "I just felt good that day," Fritz smiles. "I was in just
about the best shape of my career."
After his fall marriage with the girl he met in Ann Arbor and'
became engaged to on February 28, 1953, Fritz will probably settle
down in he United States, but he is anxiously looking forward to
returning to Sweden. That visit is slated for the summer of 1954
at which time Nilssonwants to compete in the European Cham-
pionships, already scheduled for decision in Switzerland. Of course
he'll be in the uniform of his native Sweden.
By that time, Nilsson will have graduated from, the University.
He receives his degree in June, 1954. As -for the 1956 Olympics, the
agile shotputer who has suffered few defeats on the American contin-
ent says he'd like to compete for Sweden as he did in the 1952 Games
at Helsinki. But he thinks three years is too far in advance to make
plans. Right now he's concerned with his old love, track, and his
newest love, his Michigan sweetheart.
* * * *
Haynam All-American ...
SPINNING THE SPORTS WHEEL-In case you missed the tabula-
tions, Wolverine shortstop Bruce Haynam was awarded a berth
on the Collegiate All-America first team. The 5-9 leadoff man, who
sported a lusty .360 average on the season, caught the eye of a good
many major league scouts as the Maize and Blue entry captured the
NCAA baseball title at Omaha. Only other' Big Ten performer to
be named to the All-America first team was Paul Giel, strong-armed
Minnesota right-hander. Michigan's Paul Lepley gained recognition
as the third team left-fielder . . .
Another member of the champion Wolverines, port-sider Mary
Wisniewski, made his debut Wednesday in the Detroit Baseball Fed-
eration a winning one. Pitching for the Gentile-All-Stars in Class
D competition, Wisniewski tossed a neat five-hitter to insure the
Gentile team of a playoff berth. Wisniewski was originally scheduled
to play this summer for Winthrop, Minnesota, in a semipro league.
When the league folded, Wisniewski inked his Gentile contract, and
fanned eight while walking three in his initial seven-inning appear-
ance . .
New rivalry: Michigan will meet Hofstra's powerful Eastern
independent wrestling team on January 30. Hofstra is located in
Garden City, Long Island, New York, so it'll be old home week for
Wolverine grappler Joe Scandura. He hails from nearby Bright
Waters, Long Island ...
Problem department: Track Coach Don Canham, preparing to
fly to Europe August 1st with a 10-man hand-picked track squad,
must figure out a way to enter these 10 in 14 different daily events
when the group hits regular competition in big-time Swedish and
Norwegian meets. Another worry is how to prevent sheer exhaustion
from excessive doubling up ...
Ted Topor, former Maize and Blue single-wing quarterback,
yesterday signed a contract with the professional Detroit Lions.
The 39th Lion to sign this season, Topor will join the Lion train-

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P:M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2,84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND'
LOST in Round-up Room on Friday
morning. Zippo lighter in silver case.
Maya design. Initials L.C.S. Return
to Information Desk, Museum Build-
ing. Reward.
FOR SALE
PARAKEETS $6 and $8. Canaries-fe-
males and undetermined sex $1.95.
Singers $7.95 and up. Mrs. Ruffins,
562 S. Seventh,
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39.
Skip-dents, Sanforized, whites and
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington St.
SMALL walnut gateleg table $40. One
large oak sideboard $5.00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. One up-
holstered chair $1.75. One large wal-
nut veneer table and five chairs $25.
One wool rug $75. One metal doll
house, partially furnished, $5. Two
large walnut veneer buffets, $15 each.
One small folding steel cot $10.00.
Large davenport with green leather-
ette, $15. Phone 2-9020.
FOR RENT
APARTMENTS, roomettes, or rooms by
day or week for campus visitors.
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E. Wil-
liam St. Phone 3-8454.
ROOMS FOR RENT
ONE-HALF of large double with lava-
tory and bowl. One large single.
Phone 2-1465, 923 Olivia Ave.
LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS for
married couple. Campus section.
Monroe St. Ph. 6087 evenings.

LARGE, clean double rooms for me:
students. Fall. Ph. 3-1873.

ROOMS FOR RENT

TRANSPORTATION

RIDERS NEEDED-Share expenses
New Jersey. Leave July 17. Lou
Lavine, Rm. 212, Union.

PERSONAL

WANTED-Tutor for marketing cours
Call 2-4591, 114 Greene House betwee
6:30-7:30 p.m.

HELP WANTED
WANTED-Taxi cab drivers, full or part
time. Yellow and Checker Cab Co.
113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.
BUSINESS SERVICES
RADIOS PHONOS
New and used and all guaranteed.
Phono needles -portable batteries.
We repair all types of radios, phonos,
and T. V.
Summer Special
Phono Jack and switch installed free
in your radio with purchase of V.M.
Triomatic Changer Attachment.
j, ANN ARBOR RADIO & TV
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1;a blocks east of East Eng.
WASHING, Finished Work, and Rand
Ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
HOME TYPING SERVICE-Reasonable
rates. Call Mrs. Conner, 2-7605..
EXPERT TYPIST -- Rates reasonable.
Prompt service. '914 Mary Street.
3-4449.
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
MISCELLANEOUS
IS YOUR TIME worth 60? S.ubs ribe
now, $3 a year. Phone 6007, Student
Periodical Agency.
ALTERATIONS ladies garments. Prompt
service. Ph. 2-2678 mornings if possible.
BOOKS
HCLAEBLAB

en
to
uis
se.
.en

YANKS BLANKED:
Detroit Drops Another
To Streaking Sox, 4-2

CHICAGO - (A') - Rallying be-
hind Harry Dorish's brilliant re-
lief pitching, the Chicago White
Sox yesterday edged the Detroit
Tigers, 4-2, before a crowd of 5,-
332 to sweep the three-game se-
ries.
The victory, the Sox' 21st in the
last 26 games, enabled them to
climb to within five games of the
league-leading New York Yankees
who lost to Boston, 4-0.
The line score:
Detroit 100 100 000-2 8 0
Chicago 000 310 00x-4 5 0
iHajor League
Standings

1

DANCING
Friday and Saturday Nites
Broadcasting every Saturday Evening
over WHRV from 10:30 to 11:00

CLUBW

Members
and Guests
314 E. Liberty St.
Ph. 2-3972
You Must Be 21

MARY LOU
Vocalist

I" HALL RENTALS & BANQUETS I

NATIONAL
W
*Brooklyn ... .49
Milwaukee ..46
St. Louis ... 45
*Philadelphia 40
New York . .41
Cincinnati ..34
Chicago ... .28
Pittsburgh ..27

LEAGUE
L Pct.
28 .636
32 .590
32 .584
34 .541
36 .532
44 .436
47 .373
57 .321

GB
,1'
4
71
8
15
20
251/

Marlowe, Madison (7) and
Batts; Dobson, Dorish (4) and!
Lollar. W - Dorish; L -Marlowe.
HRS: Chicago-Mele.
:k * =
BOSOX 4, YANKS 0
NEW YORK - Mel Parnelltof
the Boston Red Sox shut out the1
New York Yankees with eight hits
yesterday for a 4-0 victory over
Whitey Ford.
It was Parnell's 12th triumph.
The line score:
Boston 003 000 010-4 11 1
New York 000 000 000-0 8 1
Parnell and White; Ford and'
Berra. HRS: Boston-Gernert
GIANTS 4, PIRATES 0
PITTSBURGH - Rookie Ruben
Gomez limited Pittsburgh to two
hits yesterday and the New York
Giants went on to beat the Pirates,
4-0, for their seventh straight vic-
tory.
The line score:
New York 201 000 100-4 12 0
Pittsburgh 000 000 000-012 0
Gomez and Westrum; Face, Hall
(6), Bowman (9) and Atwell. I.-
Face. HRS: New York-Thomp-
son.
SENATORS 8, A'S 4
WASHINGTON - Ed Fitz Ger-
aid's three-run double propelled
the Washington Senators to an
8-4 victory yesterday over the
staggering Philadelphia Athletics.
The line score :
Philadelphia 000 030 104-4 6 0
Washington 005 010 02x-8 9 1
Coleman, Fanovich (4), Bishop
(5), Martin (8) and Burray; Shea
and Fitz Gerald. L-Coleman.
PICK McCULLOUGH
CINCINNATI - Clyde McCul-
lough, veteran catcher for the Chi-
cago Cubs, was chosen yesterday
to replace the injured Del Cran-
dall of Milwaukee on the Nation-
al League All-Star teamn which
meets the American League club in
Cincinnati next Tuesday.

ing camp July 23. He was Detroit's
igan colleges .

only draft choice from Mich-

a..

GOT A PICNIC PLANNED?
We've Got
" ICE COLD BEER
a SOFT DRINKS
_... * WNE
o ~And EASY Drive-Thru
Servoic

NOW PLAYING ON THE

"B ELL,
BOOK
AND
CANDLE"
8:30
EVERY NIGHT
BUT MONDAY
THROUGH JULY 19

Stage at
SALINE MILL
THEATRE
Route 112, Just Ten
Minutes from Ann Arbor
Guest Admission
$1.80
Season Membership
(4 Plays)
$6.00
Call Saline 31

* Not including night game
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 4, Pittsburgh 0
Brooklyn at Philadelphia
(night)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Brooklyn (night)
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia
(night)
Chicago at Cincinnati (2-twi-
night )
Milwaukee at St. Louis (night)
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Notre Dame Slates
Grid Theater TV
NEW YORK-(IP)-The NCAA
yesterday adopted a wait-and-see
attitude on the action of Notre
Dame in signing a five-year con-
tract for the theater-televising of
its home football schedule.
The Irish and the NCAA have
been at odds for two years on the
question of football television.
Notre Dame is an emphatic op-
ponent of the NCAA's controlled
TV program and at one time hint-
ed it might televise its games with-
out the approval of the athletic
body.
Box Office Television, Inc., will
pipe the Notre Dame games into
theaters this fall.
"r ctzov n Yl codem Cooling

GOLFERS
Have fun at the
Partridge Practice Range
We furnish clubs and balls
--2/2 miles out Washte-
now --right on U.S. 23
for 1 mile.
OPEN EVERY DAY
10 A.M.-1 P.M.

Open Daily 10 A.M. - 10 P.M.
Sunday, Noon - 7 P.M.
Phone 7191

3I"

114 E. Williams

I'

W L
New York . .53 26
Chicago ... .48 ,31
*Cleveland ...46 31
Boston .....44 38
Washington .42 39
Philadelphia 33 48
*St. Louis . . .28 53
Detroit.....26 54

Pet.
.671
.608
.597
.537.
.519
.407
.364
.325

GB
5
6
.10%
12
21
26
27?!

Ciena SL ud
LAST TIMES TONIGHT
at 7:00 and 9:00 P.M.
JEANNE I KIRK ANN
CRAIN DOUGLAS I SOTHERN
PAUL LINDA THELMA
DOUGLAS DARNELL I RITTER
A LETTER
TO THREE WIVES
"Superb . . . A brilliant screen comedy . . . enormous fun ...
has heart, meaning and infinite delight . . . 'A Letter to Three
Wives' is entrancing." - N. Y. Herald Tribune.
EXTRAI TECHNICOLOR CARTOON

* Not including night game
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 4, New York 0
Chicago 4, Detroit 2
Washington 8, Philadelphia 4
Cleveland at St. Louis (night)
TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland at Chicago (2-twi-
night)
St. Louis at Detroit (night)
Washington at New York -
Philadelphia at Boston (night)

PERSONALITY
HAIR STYLING
-FOR MEN AND WOMEN
Featuring 0 Latest Creations
* 8 Artists
* No Waiting
The Baseola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre

NOW!

I

THE MUSIC CENTER,
is offering the
FREE
THREE-SPEED RECORD ATTACHMENT
WITH THE PURCHASE OF A $19.95 KIT
CONTAINING
5 COLUMBIA Long-Playing Records
ALSO... NEW COLUMBIA ENTRE LP's
BEETHOVEN: SYMPHONY NO. 5
MOZART: SYMPHONY NO. 39
VON KARAJIN AND VIENNA PHILHARMONIC
ON ONE RECORD

III

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50c till 5:00 P.M.
ENDING TODAY!

QUIVERING WITH ALMOST UNBEARABLE SUSPENSE!
HEADtiNE-HOT DRAMA
mr OF HOW A WHOLE
CIRCUS ESCAPED
.OireCtedUElA KAZAN
Starring FREDRIC MARCH " TERRY MOORE

I

SATURDAY at 6:30, 8:00, 9:30 P.M.
Sunday at 8:00 Only
ALEC GUINNESS
"Give n sun - coic-e ;omone . - -;in a, ntoe ,fun

I

COMING SATURDAY

rAgtftm"

$298

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