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July 10, 1953 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PACE FOUR

T HE MICHIGAN IILY

FRIDAY, YULY 10, I9d

CELESTIAL NAVIGATION:
Carver Heads Group on Fix-Crawling'
,t, * *

By MURRY FRYMER
"Fix-crawling" is the name giv-
en to a new method of celestial
air navigation developed by the
engineering research department
under the supervision of Prof.
Harry C. Carver, of the mathe-
matics department.
Prof. Carver spent two weeks
in December, 1951 testing the
new navigation procedure device
against severest weather condi-
tions at Eielson Air Force base, 26
miles from Fairbanks, Alaska.
"CELESTIAL AIR navigation is
not new," Prof. Carver said. "In
the last war we could find our
position in 20 minutes by this
means. At the rate of speed that
planes now travel, 20 minutes is
too long. In 20 minutes position
will have changed by several hun-
dreds of miles in our newer, faster
planes," he maintained. -
"The University was given
the problem of discovering a
quicker method of finding posi-
tion. We believe we have found
a solution."
The importance of "fix-crawl-
ing" in the region of the pole is
further increased . because mag-
netio disturbances in the -"' ion
render a compass almcst useless,
according to Prof. Carver.
Although radio waves are the
best way of determining position
in peace time, belligerant nations
in time of war would of necessity
have to discontinue this method,
since it would aid enemy planes
as well as allied in detecting air-
craft positions, he noted.

PROF. HARRY C. CARVER
". .. easier working at the Pole"
* * * ^* * *

TO TEST "fix-crawling" the
Alaskan Air Command asked Prof.
Carver to try the device near the
pole.
"I think it's easier to work
up there," Prof. Carver said. "I
have flown 30,000 miles testing
it, and it seems to work more
easily up there than down here,"
he said.
Prof. Carver stressed the import-
ance of air bases in the polar re-
gions.
* * *
HE EXPLAINED, "With bases
at the north pole, none of these
points are more than 3,000 miles
from one another. There are in-
numerable difficulties to overcome

in establishing a military airbase
under - arctic conditions," Prof.
Carver said.
"Fuel lines freeze in the
planes," he claimed. "Oil lines
break. There are problems of
starting the motor. No ordinary
plane motor would start under
polar temperatures," he noted.
According to Prof. Carver, one
of the most unusual hazards would,
be "ice fog." The "ice fog" is a
polar cpndition in. which particlesi
of dew in the air freeze, thereby
forming an impenetrable density.j
Lights are merely reflected back
in the pilot's face, blinding him
completely, Carver remarked.

Soviet Power
FightErupts
(Continued from Page 1)
maintained that it was "now evi-
dent that Malenkov has the lead-
ership of the party and the gov-
ernment."
* * *
"THE MAIN question, therefore,
is this: Is there a fundamental
split in the party?"
Pointing out that at present
there seem to be "many issues
of not so fundamental a nature
as those that had arisen between
Stalin and Trotsky," Prof. Neal
indicated that "the split now is
propably not so deep as it was
in the 1930's.
"The necessity for making deci-
sions in new situations such as
the recent levels in the satellites
has brought conflicting ideas into
the open. In such cases it is a mis-
take to be in the minority."
THE REMOVAL of Beria, Prof.
Neal said, could result "either in a
move toward more police oppres-
sion-since the NKVD head was
accused of having permitted for-
:ign capialist plots against the
USSR to succeed-or it could re-
sult in a lessening of police op-
pression.
Agreeing to the basic reasons
for the occurance, Prof. Henry L.
Bretton also of the political sci-
ence department said, it all points
to the fact that it is impossible to
expect a modern dictatorship to
exist under collective leadership.
"The most far-reaching conse-
quences of the episode lie in the
pasing of an era, Whether this
will be for better or for worse no
one can say, but with the removal
of Beria the position of the pow-
erful police apparatus must be
changed.
"Until now the secret police has
been considered a very privileged
group. With these developments,
their power has been seriously
threatened," he concluded.
SRA To Tour
Detroit Area
An all day tour of interesting
spots in Detroit, including the Art
Institute, the International Insti-
tute and the Rackham Memorial
Bldg. has been planned for to-
morrow by the Student Religious
Association.
A group will leave Lane Hall in
private cars at 10 a.m. and return
at 10 p.m. The day will be capped
by a dinner at Belle Isle.
Any students interested' in go-
ing on the tour may contact Doris
Harpole assistant program direc-
tor, at Lane Hall.

Calendar of Events
EVENTS TODAY Luminosity Relation of Ceph-
"Fourier Transformation and X- ids," 2 p.m. in 1400 Chem-
Ray Diffraction by Crystals" willi
be discussed by P. P. Ewald of the Following -the talk will be Prof.
Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute at Gerald P. Kuiper of the University
9 a.m. in 1400 Chemistry Bldg. of Chicago who will speak on "The
Prof. William N. Lipscomb of Origin of the Solar System" at
the University of Minnesota will 3:30 p.m.
follow with a talk on "Experimen-
tal Studies of Crystal Structures: Prof. Hazel M. Losh of the as-
Fourier Development of the Elec- tronomy department will open the
tron Density and Its Application" first of three visitor's nights at
at 10 a.m. the student observatory with a
Sm.talk on "The Milky Way" at 8:30
Prof. Roberts Rugh of Colum- p.m. in Rm. 2003 Angell Hall.
bia University will lecture on After the illustrated lecture, the
"Hazards to the Fetus and Pro- fifth floor of Angell Hall will be
tection Against Ionizing Radia- open for telescopic observations
tions" at 4:15 in 1300 Chemistry of Saturn and a double star until
Bldg. 10:30 p.m.
The Symposium on Astrophysics
will continue with a lecture by
Walter Baade, of the Mt. Wilson READ AND USE
and Palomar observatories, on DA I LY CLASS I Fl EDS
"Variable Stars in Population II
and the Zero Point of the Period

MUSIC SHOPS

- CAMPUS -
211 S. State St.
Phone 9013
DOWNTOWN
205 E. Liberty St.
Phone 2-0675

With the appointment of War-
ren A. Cook as Industrial Health
Institute full-time research asso-
ciate and consultant, Dr. Otto T.
Mallery, Jr., institute director, an-
nounced an expansion of activi-
ties in the field of industrial hy-
giene.
Cook has joined the institute
staff after 16 years of work as
director of the Division of Indus-
trial Hygiene and Engineering Re-
search of a Chicago insurance

company. He has also been ap-
pointed associate professor in the
Sc'hool of Public Health.
Dr. Mallery said the addition of
Cook will round out the institute's
program of research, education
and services.
The Institute of Industrial
Health was established in 1951 on
a grant made by General Motors
Corporation in conjunction with
the Phoenix Project.

Health Institute Appoints Cook

Summer Store Hours

.:

Ui

(DURING JULY AND AUGUST)

, 1,
.1

JULY

TOPPERS
Choose from.. . Orlon-
Flxeece; Wool Boucle

Second Choir
Series Slated
Second series of choral demon-
strations, sponsored by the School
of Music, will begin at 10 a.m. to-
day in Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
Conducting the audience choir
will be Prof. Marlowe Smith of
tle Eastman School of Music.
The series will continue at 3
p.m. today and at 10 am. tomor-
row in Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
Public is invited to participate
in the singing.

shop in air-conditioned comfort in both

stores

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OPEN FRIDAY TILL 8:30 P.M.
CLOSED ALL DAY SATURDAY

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Gabardine. White, pas."
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Originally 39.95 to 79.95
Group of
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All Good for Fall Wear
at 19.98 and 25.00
See these and all other
July Clearance Bargains
in Suits, Dresses, Sports-,
wear and Accessories at
STORE HOURS: Just off
Monday, Noon 'til 8:30 P.M. South University'
Tuesday thru Saturday 9:30 to 5:30 on Forest

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

L1

I

(Continued from 'age 2)
Three Wives." Cartoon: "Hen House
Hennlery." Showings '7 and 9 p.m. Ar-
chitecture Auditorium..
Coming Events
The undergraduate women of Alice
Lloyd Hall invite the undergraduate
men students to a party to be held on
Saturday, Julyi1i, at Alice Lloyd Hall,
from 8 until 12 o'clock p.m. There will
be dancing, games, and refreshments.
Dance Saturday evening. A Town-
send's orchestra will be playing in the
League ballroom from 9 p.m. until mid-
night.
Michigan Christian Fellowship. Scav-
enger? Hunt Saturday evening at 7:00
p.m. Lane Hall. Refreshments. Every-
one Invited.
Lakesiders of First Methodist Church
invite single, young adults to Sunday
picnics. Meet at back of Church, 2:30
p.m.
Michigan Christian Fellwship. Sunday
afternoon 4 o'clock, Lane Hall. Rever-
end Bennett will speak on "Personal
Evangelism."
Popular Arts in America will present
four versions of Katherine Brush's
Night Club in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre at 8:00 p.m., Wednesday, July
15. Professor Ciaribel Baird will read
a cut version of the short story. Play
Production will stage the one act play
versior. The Radio Department will
present it as a radio drama. The Tele-
vision Department will demonstrate
the techniques necessary in the tele-
vision version. Seats are reserved, but
no admission will be charged. Two re-
servedseatsper person can be obtained
at the Lydia Mendelssohn box office,
10 a.m.-8 p.m.

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