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July 24, 1953 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-24

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FRIDAY, JULY 24, 1953

THE MICHIGAN IDAILY

PAGE TRER

THREE IN A ROW:
Indians Batter New York,10-2

r tusu .j~ ..."? '?rn... n uf> rilsr
..

By The Associated Press
CLEV[ELAND - The Cleveland
Indians beat the league-leading
New York Yankees, 10-2, yester-
day for their third victory in as
many days over Casey Stengel's
club.
Early Wynn, aiding his own
cause with three hits that drove
in two runs, won his tenth game
of the season. It was the sixth
straight victory over New York
for the Tribe, which had dropped
its first seven encounters with the
Yanks.
THREE HOME RUNS provided
the big punch among Cleveland's
14 hits. Luke Easter connected for
a 435-foot round-tripper in the
second inning to get the Indians
under way.
Al Rosen belted his 25th hom-
er of the season in the sixth
off rookie Art Shallock. The
Yankee pitcher was blasted for
five runs in the inning with the
trouble starting after two were
out.

BEN HOGAN sits on the back of an open car as it moves up lower
Broadway in New York (July 21) enrout to a city hall reception.
1 The diminutive Texan who won the British Open at Carnoustie,
Scotland, early in the month, received the traditional ticker tape
welcome from New Yorkers.

Easter reached first on an in-
field error and moved to second
on a walk to Doby. George Strick-
land followed with, his fourth
home run of the season to drive
in three runs. Joe Tipton singled
to right and scored when Wynn
doubled over the head of center-
fielder Irv Noren.
Yogi Berra hit his 16th homer of
the season in the eighth, but by
that time the Yanks were out of
contention.
RED SOX 4, WHITE SOX 3
CHICAGO - The Boston Red
Sox, with Hector (Skinny) Brown
pitching a four-hitter, beat the
second place Chicago White Sox
4-3 at Comiskey Park yesterday.
It was the tenth triumph of the
year against two defeats for
Brown, who was traded to the Red
Sox by Chicago last winter. Hoot
Evers hit his ninth homer of the
year in the fifth with Johnny Lip-
on on base.
The defeat was charged to Chi-
cago starter Saul Rogovin, his 11th
against five victories. Ace reliever
Harry Dorish worked the last two
innings for the Pale Hose.
TIGERS 9-6, SENATORS 6-4
DETROIT - The Detroit Tigers,
making a bid to climb out of the
cellar, swept a doubleheader from
the stumbling Washington Sena-
tors yesterday, 9-6 in the first
game on Ray Boone's homer in
the tenth, and 5-4 in the nightcap
on Jerry Priddy's key two-run
single.
Priddy's single climaxed a three-
run burst in the fifth inning and
.gave the Tigers a 4-2 lead which
I-M SOFTBALL
U.H. Doctors 25, Chemistry "B" 3
Hinsdale 11, Phi Delta Phi 3

they held fQr Ted Gray's fifth vic-
tory against 11 losses.
In winning their fourth straight
game, the Tigers trimmed Connie
Marrero who had an 8-1 lifetime
record against Detroit. He worked'
the first six innings and was
touched for all the Tiger runs.
Washington has now lost 11 of its
last 12 games.
aEjor League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

FOR SALE
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39.
Skip-dents, sanforized, whites and
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington St.
SMALL walnut gateleg table $40. One
large oak sideboard $5.00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. pne up-
holstered chair $1.00. One large wal-
nut veneer table and five chairs $25.
One wool rug $65. Two large walnut
veneer buffets, $15 each. One small
folding steel cot $10.00. Large daven-
port with green leatherette, $15. Two
doll high chairs, $2.50reach. Phone
2-9020.
CANARIES and Parakeets. Bird supplies
and cages. 526 S. Seventh at W. Mad-
ison. Mrs. Louise Ruffins.
FOR SALE-1948 4-door English Austin.
Good tires and body, rebuilt motor.
An excellent, economical car. Call
2-6520 after 6:00.
MODEL A-Excellent condition. Looks
and runs like new. R. Johnston, 1015
E. Huron.

FOR SALE
SELECTION of pieces from personal col-
lection of Japanese laquer boxes, trays.
brocade, dolls, prints, frames and por-
celain. Afternoons and evenings. 2388
Pinecrest Rd., Pittsfield Park. 3-0339.
PHONOGRAPH-Portable 3-speed, Web-
ster-Chicago changer with Newcomb
amplifier. For the music lover who
wants better tone and fidelity with
more power than the usual portable
phonograph. Original price, $130. Only
$85. Completely guaranteed. Ann Ar-
bor.Radio & T.V., 1215 So. Univ. Ph.
7942.
WASHING WASHINE-Small table top
type. Perfect shape. Only $17.50. Ann
Arbor Radio. 1215 So. Univ. Ph. 7942.
FOK RENT
APARTMENTS, roomettes, or rooms by
day or week for campus visitors.
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E. Wil-
1iam St. Phone 3-8454.
DELUXE Bachelor Apt. Private entrance.
Semi-private bath. Between Ypsi and
Ann Arbor. $67.50 a month. Ph. 2-9020.
PERSONAL

w
New York ...,......61
Chicago .....,......57
Cleveland ......,..53
Boston .............53
Washington ........43.
Philadelphia .......36
St. Louis ............33
Detroit ............31

L
30
35
38
40
50
54
60
60

Pet.
.670
.620
.582
.570
.462
.400
.355
.341

GB
4%
8
9
19
24%
29
30

ROOMS FOR RENT
LARGE, clean double rooms for men
students. Fall. Ph. 3-1873.
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Taxi cab drivers, full or part
tine. Yellow and Checker Cab Co.
113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.
ATTENTION-Aspiring, young, beauti-
ful actresses desiring a rapid rise.
Contact Morgan and Kahan Theatri-
cal Producers and Directors. 3-4280.
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, Finished Work, and Sand
Ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
EXPERT TYPIST -- Rates reasonable.
Prompt service. 914 Mary Street,.
3-4449.
RADIO-PHONO SERVICE
Fast-In Today, Ready Tomorrow
Reasonable Rates-Guaranteed Service
Phonos & Auto Radios Our Specialty
New & Used Radios & Phonos
Custom Auto Radios at Reduced Prices
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T.V.
1215 So. Universitv Ph. 7942

ALL CONTENDERS:

Big Ten Loaded with Gridiron Power

(Third in a series)
By IVAN N. KAYE
The greatest concentration of
football strength this autumn will
undoubtedly reside in the Western
Conference.
Never before in its 58 year exis-
tence has the Big Ten been so
loaded with gridiron powerhouses.
MICHIGAN STATE, the na-
tion's number one team last year,
will be playing its first conference
schedule. Add to the Spartans the
perennial title contenders Ohio
State and Michigan, the defending
conference co-champions Wiscon-
sin and Purdue, plus always dan-
gerous Minnesota and Illinois, and
top this list off with an improved
Northwestern team, and it be-
comes apparent that the heartland
of football in 1953 will be the
Western Conference.
Just outside the realm of the
Big Ten, but still within the
confines of Midwestern football
lies the powerful Notre Dame
team of Frank Leahey. The.
Irish, after a great season in
1952, which included victories

over four conference champions,
will field a stronger eleven, and
should make headlines on sports
pages across the land again this
autumn.
Notre Dame will face Georgia
Tech in an all-important game
early in the season. The Engineers
won eleven in a row last fall, and
capped their brilliant campaign
with' a bruising 24-7 victory over
unbeaten Mississippi in the New
Orleans Sugar Bowl.
TECH WILL BE around once
again when the top teams in Dixie
are picked this year. There will
be competition though from the
established Southern powers Ala-
bama, Tulane, Mississippi, Geor-
gia and Tennessee.
Tennessee's great coach Gen-
eral Bob Neyland has retired
after one of the longest and
most successful careers in the
annals of the sport, but the
Volunteers will still be one of the
most feared teams in the South
.this year. Neyland built his out-
stnading record over two de-
cades at Knoxville on the
strength of sound blocking and
tackling. His offense consisted
of only a few simple plays, but
he imbued his teams with such
sound fundamentals that even
when the opposition figured out
the play, the blocking was so
devastating that it worked any-
way. ,
GENERAL NEYLAND'S old al-
ma mater West Point is still re-
building out of the ashes of the
tragic scandal thatrocked the
academy two years ago. Earl Blaik
will be on top in a few years; he
is that kind of coach, but 1953 is
still a formative year for the Ca-
dets. About all in the way of
cheer on The Plain is the memory
of the Glenn Davis-Doc Blanchard
teams of yesteryear.
Elsewhere in the East, Prince-

GOLFERS
Have fun at the
Par ridge Practice Range
We furnish clubs and balls
-21/ m iles out Washte-
now - right on U.S. 23
for 1 mile.

ton will be after the Ivy League
crown which it relinquished last
year to Pennsylvania. The Qua-
kers have been forsaken by their
sister schools and have gone to
the nation at large in the for-
mation of their 1953 schedule.
Penn will play California, Ohio
State, Michigan and Notre
Dame among others, and all
without the benefit of spring
practice, which has fallen out
of the good graces of the Ivy
League authorities..
The Pacific Coast Conference,
still basking in the sunlight of 'its
first Rose Bowl triumph over the
Big Ten, will have its share of
strong teams. Washington's Hus-
kies, who will open Michigan's
schedule at Ann Arbor, will field a
good team, but the real power
seems to lie with Lynn Waldorf at
the University of California. Al-
ways fortunately endowed with a
horde of material, the Golden
Bears are still snarling after last
season's failures, and appear ready
to roll.
* * *
SOUTHERN California and its
cross-town rival U.C.L.A. will be
right in the middle of the battle
for the roses, but at this early
juncture it looks as though Pappy
Waldorf will be spending another
New Year's Day at Pasadena.
Three times before he has taken
an unbeaten team into the big
stadium only to see it humbled
by the Big Ten representative.
The Coast has at last tasted tri-
umph in the Rose Bowl however,
and hopes are running high for a
repeat this season.
The Southwest, the home of
forward passing on fourth down,
should see another wild struggle
for the conference championship
and the accompanying Cotton
Bowl bid. Last year Texas man-
aged to weather the storm un-
defeated, one of the few times
in recent seasons that a team
has gone through the league
without losing. It is impossible
at this point to pick a winner
in the cowboy conference, but
the eventual champion must
beat Texas. That is the way it
generally is in the Southwest.
Overall, the season will be one
of the most interesting of recent
years. A surplus of strong teams
should keep most of the conference
races in doubt until late November.
Perhaps it is too early for a pre-
diction, but it should hold that
the team which fights to the top
of the Big Ten will be a team more
than capable of handling any-
thing that the Coast puts into the
Rose Bowl in the way of opposi-
tion.
f (Tomorrow: The New Rule and
its effect on Football)

YE'STERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 10, New York 2
Detroit 9-5, Washington 6-4
Boston 4, Chicago 3
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Detroit (night)
Philadelphia at Chicago (night)
Boston at St. Louis (2) (twi-night)
Washington at Cleveland
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
Brooklyn ...........59 32 .648 ..
Milwaukee ..........53 37 .589 5%
Philadelphia .......50 38 .568 74
New York ..........47 39 .547 9%/
St. Louis ..........49 41 .544 9%
Cincinnati .........42 50 .457 17%
Chicago ..........31 57 .352 26%
Pittsburgh ..........30 67 .309 32
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cincinnati 7, Pittsburgh 0
St. Louis at New York (rain)
Chicago at Brooklyn (rain)
Milwaukee at Philadelphia (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Pittsburgh (night)
Milwaukee at Brooklyn (night)
Cincinnati at New York (night)
St. Louis at Philadelphia (night)

READ
DAILY
CLASS I FIEDS

MR. ALC-IBIADES
Your interests are rather pleasing,
But not entirely appeasing.
Add Gide, Matisse and Machiavelli,
We're off on a game of Botticelli
-Or were you simply teasing?
Bael-Joly
Apt. No. 5, 331 Packard
(Tonight at 8:30)

161o. U my V..if
REAL ESTATE
HOMESITES-On Huron River Dr., 5
mi. west Ann Arbor in hilly, Wooded
area overlooking Huron River. Write
Frank Offer, 1710 Seaborn, Detroit 14,
Phone Lorain 7-1495.

STT

STARTING SATURDAY

PRICES THIS ATTRACTION ONLY
MATINEE ADULTS 60c NIGHTS 80c - CHILDREN ALL TIMES 35c

TONIGHT & TOMORROW NIGHT 8 P.M.
Dept. of Speech Presents
Odets' New Thriller
THIECOUNTRY GIRL.
really excellent production . . . more than worth while
to take in COUNTRY GIRL this weekend, for the perform-
ance is highly entertaining . . ."
-Leonard Greenbaum, THE MICHIGAN DAILY
$1.20 - 90c - 60c
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

)ve3

W hen youre in 1 o r nn e

OPEN EVERY
10 A.M.- 11

DAY
P.M.

er etion anModemrn oo'n"
TODAY & SAT.

You'll hear this lilting song sung
in Samuel Goldwyn's new musical
wonderfilm, and suddenly--you'll.
feel nine feet tall! For that's what
this enchanting story, this love
story, this tender story does to you
- as no other film has ever done
before. For into his multi-million
dollar musical production "Hans
Christian Andersen", Samuel Gold-
wyn has poured all the emotions
of which the human heart is capa-
ble and, as each comes into full
play, you'll feel yourself glow,
grow -till you,
too, seem nine
feet tall!

F

NOW PLAYING
AT
SALINE MILL THEATRE
Route 112 at Saline
8 Miles South on Main
BERNARD SHAW'S
"ARMS AND
THE MAN"
Performances Every Night but Monday
at 8:30 - till Aug. 2

I

/

Tickets $1.80

Call Saline 31

TONIGHT and Saturday
George Raft
"OUTPOST
in

Cihema KS LIui
LAST TIMES TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:15 P.M.
HENRY FONDA - OLIVIA DeHAVILLAND
in JAMES THURBER'S
"THE MALE ANIMAL"
EXTRA!
TECHN ICOLOR
CARTOON FESTIVAL
STARTING SATURDAY at 7:00 & 9:30 P.M.
Sunday at 8:00 Only
Darryl F. Zanuck presents
BETTE ANNE GEORGE CELESTE
DA'IS -BAXTER SANDERS' Holm

SAMUEL GOLDWYN,
PRESENTS
sns
aChri Sti an,
and infroducing
FARLEY GRANGER - JEANMAIRE
Directed by CHARLES VIDOR . Screenplay by MOSS HART
Words and Music by FRANK LOESSER
Choreography by ROLAND PETIT
Distributed by RKO RADIO PICTURES, INC.

2

I

BEAT THE HEAT
TO THE PUNCH

0
*'

MOROCCO"
Starting Sunday
FIRST SHOWING

with
* ICE COLD BEER

I

I

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