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July 19, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

_____________________________________________________________________________________ I I

European Sports Tough
For American Athletes

NEW YORK-OP)-Let's see,
now. We'll give them the soccer.
That's not our game. If we could
r:eplace it in the Olympics with
American football we might have
a chance.
That would be asking too much,
though, as we already have bas-
ketball in there, and if every
country insisted on the inclusion
of some game they invented or in
which they were particularly pro-
ficient the competition would take
the form of exhibitions and they
might as well bring on the two-
headed calf and stuffed whale.
There are sports now included
in the Olympic program, other
than soccer, in which Ameri-
cans have not taken any gold

medals. Chiefly because' we
don't go in very strong for the
events.
Cycling, for one. And fencing,
and field hockey, and the penta-
thlon, and Graeco-Roman wrest-
ling. Our failure at cycling is easy
to understand, as we are just vic-
tims of prosperity. Americans ride
in automobiles as soon as they are
old enough to convince their dads
they have been exposed to com-
mon sense, and caught at least a
mild case.
We've been blanked down through
the years in the 5000-meter and
10,000-meter runs, the 3,000-meter
steeplechase, the 50,000 and 10,000
meter walks and the javelin
throw.

Three More
In Olympic
Tournament
HELSINKI- (A)--Three more
teams qualified for the Olympic
Basketball Tournament yesterday
-all of them getting in by the
back door.
Cuba, Hungary and Egypt sur-
vived a pre-Olympic qualifying
tourney to join Bulgaria, Canada,
and the Philippines along with ten
other countries previously selected
for the 16-team competition.
Egypt edged Italy in the best
game produced by the qualifica-
tion trials.
Cuba defeated Belgium 71-63,
and Hungary staggered past
Greece, 47-44.
The other competing countries
who qualified on past perform-
ances in international competition
were the United States, Russia,
Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico,
France, Finland, Czechoslovakia
and Uruguay.

GRID PREVIEW OF '52:
'M' Football Future Uncertain

(This is the first in a series of ar-
ticles dealing with the coming 1952
football season.)
By IVAN KAYE
The Michigan football picture
for 1952 is clouded with uncer-
tainty.
Where the Wolverines will wind
up in the rugged Western Confer-
ence is anybody's guess. Experts
at this early point are not boom-
ing 'Coach Bennie Oosterbaan's
boys for Conference honors, but
any football prognosticator worth
his sodium chloride knows that
Michigan teams can never be
counted out of a championship
race.
* * *
WITNESS THE rags-to-riches
tale of the 1950 squad which
clinched an undisputed title and
a Rose Bowl bid by beating Ohio
State in a snow storm at Colum-
bus, while Northwestern was de-
railing the front-running Illini at
Evanston. Michigan jumped from
third place to the championship
in one afternoon.
The Illinois squad could feel
that California sunshine the
previous week when they knock-
ed Ohio State from the top of
ajor League
IStandings

CLASSIFIEDS]

_

the heap. Someone forgot to in-
form Northwestern that they
couldn't win however, and the
lads from Evanston rose to
thwart the Illinois title ambi-
tions. While all this was trans-
piriAg, the underdog Wolverines
were running an Ohio squad
which at mid-season was con-
sidered the best in the land.
The preceeding could only occur
in the wild Western Conference,
and shows the futility of trying to
pick the winner before the gun
ends the season's last game.
MICHIGAN will face one of the
toughest schedules in the nation
this fall. The Wolverines open
with Michigan State, a team rated
by many as the best in the coun-
try last season. Next comes a trip
to Palo Alto, California for an in-
tersectional tussle with the de-
fending Pacific Coast Conference
champion, Stanford University.
Indiana will appear here in the
season's first conference game.
The following week will see
the Maize and Blue oppose
Northwestern in the lair of the
Wildcats at Evanston. Four con-
secutive home appearances with
Minnesota, Illinois, Cornell and
Purdue will precede the season
finale against the Ohio State
Buckeyes in Columbus.
Michigan State and Stanford
are top-drawer competition, and
there are many easier ways to op-
en a football campaign than
games with these schools. Both
Indiana and Northwestern are
building and could cause trouble
as the Wildcats did last year when
they upset Michigan, 6-0.
* * *
MINNESOTA WILL be driven
to frenzy pitch to regain posses-
sion of the famed "Little Brown
Jug" which has eluded them since
1942. The Illini are the defending

conference champions and are de-
finitely the team to beat in the
coming race. The Cornell game
will give the Wolverines a chance
at revenge.
The Big Red humbled -Michi-
gan at Ithaca last November,
20-7. Purdue is being tagged,
along with Wisconsin as a prime
contender for the title. The
Boilermakers have done a great
deal of quiet building and are
now ready to make it pay off.
The curtain closer at Columbus
will be another very tough
game. Ohio is loaded, even with-
out Vic Janowicz.
The toughest part of this sche-
dule is the beginning. The first
two games, even though they are
both with non-conference oppo-
nents could very well tell the
story of the whole 1952 season.
** *
CONTRARY TO last season,
freshmen will not be permitted to
compete in Big Ten football. This
means that the conference coach-
es will have to work with just
their present teams with no hope
of uncovering promising freshman
talent and moving it up to varsity
squads, as was done last season.
Wisconsin, for instance, used
a freshman fullback named Al-
lan Ameche who shattered the
Big Ten rushing record in his
first year. He is being touted
for possible All-American hon-
ors as a sophomore this fall.
Although the experts would
consider it an upset, it is entirely
within the realm of possibility
that Michigan will be conference
champion this year. The Wolver-
ines will have a big line once
again, a more varied offense than
last year, and greater depth in
backfield talent. Add a little luck
to these ingredients and there may
be the recipe for a champion.

LOST AND FOUND
LOST--Gray Kitten in vicinity of East
William and Thompson. Call No. on
his tag or bring to 512 E. William,
Back apt.
FOR SALE
ANTIQUE CHAIRS - 1 Hitchcock, 1
Duncan Fyfe, 1 arm Windsor, 1 comb
back Windsor. 1 tilt top table. Mis-
cellaneous objects: candle sticks,
lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph.
2-1710.
ART SALE private collection, oils, water
colors, portfolios, books. 1918 Day,
Phone 2-1710.
HOUSE TRAILER-1 wall with built in
book case. 30 ft. "cozy-coach", has
natural wood finish throughout, elec-
tric refrigerator, electric hot water
heater. Very liberal terms. Can be
seen at 410 E. Jeff.
FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE APT. near Campus to
sublet July 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar-
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evenings.
FRATERNITY or sorority house for
rent, approved for twenty-five. Close
to campus. Write Box 17.
AVAILABLE - A new 3-room de-
luxe apartment which accommodates
four. Completely furnished, electric
stove and refrigerator. Private en-
trance. $95 per month. Will rent for
summer. Need a car. Call 2-9020.
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
tions at The Campus Tourist Homes
now. 518 E. William. Phone 3-8454.
4 STUDENTS--large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month. Also single room. 320 E.
Washington after 4 P.M.
SINGLE ROOM, cooking & laundry
privileges for girl; call 312 S. Thayer
after 6 P.M.
BUSINESS SERVICES
ALTERATIONS - Woman's garments.
Prompt service. Catherine St. near
State. Call A. Graves, Ph. 2-2678.
TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate,
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 S. Main.

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
MENS' USED BIKES and used radios.
Ann Arbor Radio & T.V. 1215 So.
Univ., Ph. 7942. 1% blocks east of
East Engineering.
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T V
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1% blocks' east of East Engin.
HELP WANTED
MAKE $20.00 DAILY. Sell luminous
name plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass., free sample and details.
TRANSPORTATION
MAN WITH CAR wants man for trip-"
Quebec. Gaspe' etc. July. or August.
Share Exp. G. 514 So. Forest. Phone
2-7128.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

NATIONAL

Brooklyn
New York
St. Louis
Chicago
Philadelphia
Boston
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh

W
56
52
49
44
40
36
35
25

LEAGUE
L Pet.
22 .718
30 .634
38 .563
41 .518
44 .476
48 .429
50 .412
64 .281

GB
6
111/2
15%/
19
23
241/2
36%/

STUDENT
SUPPLIES
Typewriters
Repaired
Sold
" Bought
Webster-Chicago Tope
and Wire Recorders
Fountain Pens Repaired
by a Factory Trained Man
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State Ph. 7177

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York at Chicago (Rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Pittsburgh-Ers-
kine (9-2) vs. Pollet (3-10).
Philadelphia at Cincinnati--
Simmons (8-3) vs. Raffensber-
ger (10-7).
New York at Chicago-Hearn
(10-2) vs. Hacker (6-3).
Boston at St. Louis (night)--
Wilson (8-7) vs. Chambers (4-2)
or Brazle (6-2).
AMERICAN LEAGUE

i

I

Panlovtn
SEMI-ANNUAL PRE-INVENTORY SALE
of
CLOTHING and FURNISHINGS
Starting Monday, July 21st

New York
Boston
Cleveland
Washington
Chicago
Philadelphia
St. Louis
Detroit

W
52
47
48
45
47
37
35
27

L
33
37
38
39
41
41
52
57

Pct.
.612
.560
.558
.536
.534
.474
.402
.321

GB
41
61
11%
18
24/

FIRST CHURCH
1833 Woshtenaw

OF CHRIST, Scientist
Ave.

9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
July 20-Life
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
Sunday Evening Services will be discontinued during
the months of July and August.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings
from 7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:3 0.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Minister-Leonard A. Parr
Student Work-Marilynn Paterson,
Robert Inglis
Director of Music-Harold Haugh
Organist-Howard R. Chase
10:45 A.M.: Junior Church Chapel.
10:45 A.M.: Miss Flora May Slosson, a Grad of
the University of Michigan and a student at
Chicago Theological Seminary, will speak on
"The City of God."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S, Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
10:45 A M.: Morning Worship, Sanctuary. "Two
Words I Would Add to The Lord's Prayer"
Dwght S. Large preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper. Social Hall.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Professor
Slosson speaking on "Religion and Politics."
Wesley Foundation rooms open daily. Summer
5: t~, i n .,+.. ,. n mo

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Corner Hill & Tappan Sts.
Rev.'Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Associate Student Work Directors: Marilyn Pat-
erson, Robert Inglis
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon: "What
Is Your Answer to Communism?" by Rev. Jo-
seph Smith. Organist, Roy Jorgensen; Soloist,
Arthur Elfring.
Student Guild: Meet at Congregational Church at
6:00 P.M. for a cost supper. Dr. Morton King
will speak on "The Dominant Minority in the
South" at 7:00 P.M.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30 A.M.: Service, with sermon by
the pastor, "How to Handle Sign-seekers."
Sunday at 1:30 P.M.: Meet at Chapel for joint
outing to Waterloo Portage Lake with MSC
and Wayne groups.
Tuesday at 8:30 P.M.: "This Is The Life!" hour
of Christian sound-movies.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Rev.J. G. Van Dyke, Mich. Director of Church
Extension, Christian Reformed Church, will
preach on "God is Good."
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. J. G. Van Dyke
will speak on "Behold Your King."
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETINGLane Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 6, Chicago 3
Detroit 2, Philadelphia 1
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Washington
(night) -- Bearden (3-1) vs.
Moreno (5-5).
Detroit at Philadelphia-Hoeft
(1-3) vs. Kellner (6-8) or Scheib
(4-3).
Chicago at New York-Pierce
(10"-6) vs. Morgan (4-3)
Cleveland at Boston -- Wynn
(10-8) vs. Hudson (7-5).
DID YOU KNOW: that Matt
Mann, Michigan's swimming coach
and American Olympic mentor for
1952, has sent more men to the
Olympics over the years than any
other coach in the sport. This is
the first time the genial Michigan
athletic figure has been head
coach of the American Olympic
swimming squad?
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

20%

off

This is our twice.
and furnishings.

yearly pre-inventory sale of fine quality Van Boven clothing
All merchandise is from our regular stock.

CLOTHING

20% off
Special Group
Sport Coats and Topcoats

Summer Suits

Special Group Summer Suits
$17.50
Alteration Charges on this group

I

TICKET SALE
for
Dept. of Speech
Plays
July 23-26
"Winterset"
By Maxwell Anderson
July 30-Aug. 2---
"Second
Threshold"
By Philip Barry
Aug. 7, 8, 9-1 1-
"The Merry
Wives of
Windsor"
an opera in conjunction

Selected Group of
Regular Weight Suits
20% off

Special Gr
$3.85 ...3

roup Shirts
for $11.25

Selected Group Neckwear

FORMERLY
$2.50
3.50
5.00

NOW
$1.65
2.65
3.65

formerly $4.95 to $5.50
$4.35 .., formerly $5.95

FURNISHI NGS

Selected Groups... 1/3 off
Sportshirts, pajamas, hose, sweaters, sleeveless sweaters, walking shorts, etc.
Straw Hats. .12 off

All Sales Final

No Lay-Aways

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North Division at Catherine

I

All price reductions as listed are effective
in ni wit eni t enrp nfi wpl1

11

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11

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