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July 19, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-19

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PAGE OUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JMY 19, 1952

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,_ i _ - -

BRITISH OPINIONS:
Britons Admire American Traits

" I

By BARNES CONNABLE
Special To The Daily
LONDON-What do the British
think of Americans?
We asked a few and here's
what they had to say.
On the whole, they like them.
Strangely enough, they are par-
ticularly admiring of traits which
they don't have themselves.
A BIG ONE is frankness. One
Englishman said of his country-
men that they would take months
to say what a Yankee could blurt
out in a few minutes.
American businessmen who
have interests over here have
apparently won many friends by
their directness in discussing a
subject. Coupled with this qual-
ity is a natural informality
which the Britisher, try as he
will, finds hard to achieve.
On the other hand, some tour-
ists have done Anglo-American re-
lations no good. A number of
them, Britons told us, are resent-
ed for "flashiness," and in this
economically sick country the neg-
ative reaction can be well under-
stood.
THE BRITISH also don't like to
be bossed around because they
have been bossed a good deal long-
er than we have.

Consequently, if an American
saleschief r i g i d l y prescribes
rules of procedure for a British
branch of his company, he is
likely to meet with considerable.
opposition. Compromise must be
the keynote in any successful
meeting of minds across the At-
lantic.
In Britain you have the feeling
that peacetime and wartime alli-
ances with America don't hinge
merely on hatred or fear of a com-
mon enemy. There is a strong
bond between the two nations and
you have to come over here to
really sense it.
. * , *
THE REVOLUTION is forgot-
ten. Col. Mc Cormick is despised,
but the Britisher realizes that he
doesn't necessarily represent your
opinion. The best way to get off
on a good footing over here is to
pronounce the Chicago Tribune
the world's worst newspaper.
In talking with Britishers, a
good thing to remember is hu-
mility. The Englishman has it,
but he also has a stronger °na-
tional pride than ours, for he
has had more years to build it
up.

down'he knows the star of empire
has plummetted. In so much as
America is a 'world power, he
speak on an equal level. But from
the standpoint of experience, he
wants you to do the listening.
* * *
WHEN YOU HEAR an English-
man on world politics, the scene
reminds you of a dying king pre-
paring the prince for the ups and
downs of life. He has a good deal
to say about running the kingdom
and he is somewhat annoyed at
your first fumbling errors.
But he has confidence in you,
if you will only study the suc-
cesses and failures of his life's
work. And he realizes it's a
tough job ahead.
The Britisher has a lot of re-
spect for you. He liked your pi-
lots, although he still thinks his
are better. And he's glad you nom-
inated Eisenhower for the presi-
dency.
But he wants to be consulted on
things like the Yalu bombings. He
wants you to be more understand-
ing of his problems, such as the
necessity of trading with the Iron
Curtain in non-strategic mate-
rials.
After all, he says, you aren't so
lily-white yourself. And he has
a point.

Moron
CHICAGO-- UP) -The best
type of motorist is not a person
of high intelligence, but a high
class moron, with a mental age
of 10 or 12 years,
This observation was advan-
ced yesterday at a seminar of
Northwestern University's Traf-
fic Institute by James Stan-
nard Baker, director of the In-
stitutes' research and develop-
ment. Said Baker:
"The low mentality motorist,
once he is taught to drive pro-
perly, will not deviate from
what he has learned. The high-
er mentality is inclined to ex-
periment and also to think
about other things to the det-
riment of his driving."
Air ROTC
Ends Training
Fifty University students in the
Air Force ROTC will end their
one-month .tour .of . active duty
training today. They are station-
ed in Chanute, Ill., Westover,
Mass., Scott, Ill., Madison Munici-
pal Airport, Wisc., and Barksdale,
La.
Their training includes becom-
ing familiar with weapons, flying
and learning about aircraft.

Passage Might Involve
University Amusements

(Continued from Page 1)
IT IS NOT KNOWN whether
the city can legally collect such a
tax on a University function. The
proposal, if passed, would add a
city tax to football and other ath-
letic event tickets, as well as other
University-sponsored events, such
as dances, concerts, plays, movies,
and lectures.
One theory is that the city
cannot legally tax a state insti-
tution or its program. Another
view is that the tax would be
levied against spectators of an
athletic event and not the spon-
sors of it.
The verbal portion of the oppo-
sition (the University refuse d to

comment on the proposal) has
charged that the proposed tax is
"unfair" and "discriminatory" and
is aimed at the amusement indus-
try only.
Other objections range from the
danger that the city may impose
more taxes once it is empowered
to levy excise taxes, to the cry of
"it's not fair to add to the Feder-
al tax of 20 per cent on admissions
prices!"
An opposition campaign led by
the Butterfield Theatres and CIO
unions, in addition to voters' re-
luctance to levy taxes upon them-
selves were apparently behind the
defeat, said the Ann Arbor News
in April.

'i

CAMPAIGNING -- Presidential hopeful, Sen. Estes Kefauver,
holds a young patriot aloft during one of his numerous cam-
paign stopovers.

The Briton does
you as an inferior,

not talk with
although deep

The Market Research Department
of
THE PROCTOR & GAMBLE CO.
has a number of openings for young women col-
lege graduates between 21 and 26 to travel about
the country conducting consumer surveys with no
selling involved after a training period of approxi-'
mately 7 months in Cincinnati, Ohio. Prerequisites
include a driver's license and ability to do simple
arithmetic, In addition to salary while traveling, all
expenses are paid.
For further information, write:
MISS VIRGINIA WEISS
MARKET RESEARCH DEPARTMENT
The Proctor & Gamble Company
Gwynne Building
CINCINNATI 1, OHIO

71

* IT'S SAFE
* IT'S EASY TO DO
* IT'S MORE
CONVENIENT
when you
BANK BY MAIL
at
TlE. ANN ARBOR BANK
Main and Huron Sts.

Ciftepa SL q1/4
presents
REX HARRISON
"THl HS
AND M.M UIR"W
A prim widow and the ghost of a salty sea captain indulge
in a strange and hilarious romance.
"A jolly film"-N.Y. TIMES
GENE with GEORGE
TIERNEY . SANDERS
DIRECTED BY JOSEPH MANKIEWICZ
(All About Eve; Letter To Three Wives)
-- Also
TECHNICOLOR
CARTOON FESTIVAL
4 - WARNER BROS. MERRIE MELODIES - 4
starring
BUGS BUNNY
DANGEROUS DAN °McFOO
DAFFY DUCK
PORKY PIG'
LAST TIMES ARCHITECTURE
TONIGHT!! 0^c AUDITORIUM
7:15 and 9:30 (OppositeBus.
Ad. Bldg).
Starting Times:
Cartoon Festival 7:15, 9:30-Ghost & Mrs. Muir 7:45, 10:00

M
M
I
M
M
f
f
w
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M

ADMIRERER-A Russell supporter regards one of the Georgia
Senator's strategically placed campaign posters.
U' Summer Band Rehearses

The 87 members of the Univer-
sity Summer Session Band are
busy practicing for their second
concert of the season to be given'
Thursday, July 24.
William D. Revelli, conductor,
has found himself in a turnabout
situation for most of the students
in the band are themselves con-

ductors during the regular school
year who are attending the Uni-
versity for summer graduate work.
For their second concert, the
Band will be augmented by the
Cass Technical High School Band
and assisted by Percival Price,
well-known carilloneur.

State Street at Nickels Arcade

1108 South Unviersity

COMPLETE BANKI1G FACILITIES

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