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July 04, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_. ,. .... a ..

FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

'White Sox, Giants Close in on Leaders

I CLASSIFIEDS

* * *

* * *

Giants Dump Dodgers, 4-3,
Trail by Only Two Games

Chicago Takes Two Games
As Yanks, Senators Divide

By The Associated Press
BROOKLYN - Don Mueller's
big bat and accurate right arm
proved the deciding factors yes-
terday as the New York Giants
vanquished the Brooklyn Dodgers,
4-3, to pull within two games of
the National League lead.
Mueller had a hand in all the
Giants' scoring as they whipped
their arch interborough rivals for
the sixth straight time, four in a
row at Ebbets' Field. Not since
R the days of the oldest fans have
the Giants been able to accom-
plish such a feat.
* * *
THE RIGHT FIELDER walked7
,s in the second inning, advanced a
base on another pass to George
Wilson, moved to third on a force;
play and scored the first Gianto
run on a long fly by catcher Sal
Yvars.
In tbe sixth, Mueller featured
a three-run outburst against
Billy Loes with a scorching
triple to the left center field
vwall that scored Whitey Lock-
man and Bobby Thomson. Don
crossed the plate a few moments
later on Wilson's single to right.
The Dodgers, who had taken a
2-1 lead in the second on a walk,
an error by Thomson, and Billy
Cox's single, threatened to tie the
Sgamein the eighth but were
thwarted by Mueller's fine throw
to the plate. Singles by Peewee
Reese and Jackie Robinson and a
sacrifice put the potential tying
runs in scoring position with one
out. Duke Snider hit back to
Hearn and Reese was caught in a
run-down with Robinson taking
third and Snider taking second.
* * *
LEFTHANDED swinging George
Shuba, pinch hitting for Andy
Pafko against righthander Jim
Hearn, singled to right. The blow
easily scored Robinson but Sni-
der also tried to score and was
cut down at the plate, Mueller to
Yvars.
Brooklyn outhit the Giants,
eight to four, received four
walks and put two more men
The Leaders.

on base through Giant errors,
but four double plays reduced
their scoring chances. Three
Dodgers were cut down at the
plate. Hearn was credited with
the victory, his ninth against
two losses, but needed help from
Hoyt Wilhelm in the ninth.
* * *
REDS 5, PIRATES 1
CINCINNATI - Bubba Church
won his first game of the season
yesterday, holding Pittsburgh to
four hits while the Cincinnati
Reds pounded out a 5 to 1 vic-
tory over veteran pitcher Howie
Pollet.
Joe Adcock's homer with Bobby
Adams on second, and two doubles
and a single by Roy McMillan
sparked the Reds' attack. It also'
ended a three-game losing streak

I

for Cincinnati.
* * *
GUS BELL'S homer into the
rightfield bleachers in the seventh
spoiled Church's bid for a shut-
out. The blast also gave Pitts-
burgh its first run in 17% inn-
ings.
Church, who has lost two
games and until today had not
finished one this season, gave
only one safety in the first five
innings.
Cincinnati won the game in the
fourth 'inning on four hits, in-
cluding Adcock's homer, a single
by Adams, and doubles by McMil-
lan and Andy Seminick.
Fine Torgeson
For Slugging
Giant Catcher
BOSTON --(R)- Boston Braves'
outfielder-first baseman Earl Tor-
geson was fined $100 yesterday for
slugging New York Giant catcher
Sal Yvars in Tuesday night's game
and Yvers drew a $25 fine for
breaking Torgeson's bat.
National League President War-
ren Giles notified the clubs, play-
ers and umpires just before the
start of yesterday's series finale-
which the Braves won 2-1 to end
their own six-game losing string
and stop the Giants' victory skein
at four games.
* * *
GILES CALLED Torgeson the
aggressor. The big Bostonian op-
ened a gash over Yvars' right eye
with a terrific left hook after the
two feuded in the first inning
while Torgeson was at bat.
Yvars complained Torgeson
was hitting him on the shins
with the backswing of his bat,
but Torgy told him to move
back a bit and not crowd the
plate. The Bostonian then
smacked a single only to find
that Yvars had smashed his bat
while he was running down to
first base.
At his first chance-in the sec-
ond inning-Torgeson raced to the
Giants' dugout and swung at
Yvars, crashing him against the
cement wall. The head cut later
required stitching at a hospital.
. * * *
BOTH TORGESON and Boston
pitcher Vern Bickford were tossed
out of the game by umpire Larry
Goetz, Bickford for demanding to
know why Goetz hadn't banished
Yvars.
It was announced after yester-
day's game that Bickford has been
fined $25 for his run-in with
Warneke.

THE HALFWAY MARK-in the 1952 baseball season finds the
Brooklyn Dodgers of Chuck Dressen (left) and the New York
Yaikees of Casey Stengel perched atop their respective leagues.
The Giants and White Sox will be gunning for the leaders in
today's double header fireworks. Leo Durocher's crew is only two
games back, while Paul Richards' Windy City boys are breathing
down Yankee necks from two and a half games away.
TIGER TROUBLES:
IBriggs Recommends
Firing Rolfe, B~art ell

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Player and Club
Rosen, Cleveland.
Jensen, Wash'gt'n
Fain, PhiladelphiaJ
Kell, Boston ..
'DiMaggio, Boston.+
Goodman, Boston
Robinson, Chi. ...'
Bauer, New York .
Mantle, New York
Zernial, Phila. ...
Groth, Detroit.
Mitchell, Cleveland

G
69
65
50
67
63
60
75
66
58
59
59
56

AB
262
254
195
255
252
194
290
258
217
227
200
193

R
45
38
30
29
47
29
43
34
36
34
19
21

H
86
82
63
81
79
61
90
78
65
67
59
57

l

HOME RUNS

Wertz, Detroit ....................
Berra, New York..........
RUNS BATTED IN
Robinson, Chicago .............
Rosen, Cleveland ............
* * * U
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Pct.
.328
.323
.323
.318
.314
.314
.310
.302
.299
.295
.295
.295
15
15
50
Pct.
.332
.325
.320
.314
.308
.307
.305
.302
.300
.297

DETROIT-(M)-The big ques-
tion-Who will manage the De-
troit Tigers tomorrow night?-has
a tricky, double twist.
The Tiger board of directors
meet at 5 p.m. tomorrow and Pre-
sident Spike Briggs will recom-
mend dismissal of Manager Red
Rolfe and Coach Dick Bartell.
* * *
THE BOARD will likely approve
S p i k e's recommendation and
name an interim manager. And
that's where the tricky, double
twist starts.
The meeting may run so late
that Rolfe will be out on the
field with his team for pre-
game practice.
So will Rolfe manage the team
tomorrow night (game time is 8:30
p.m.) or will the new manager
take over?
* * 1'
PRESIDENT BRIGGS* doesn't
have the answer for that question
yet.
It may be that Rolfe will stay
in charge for tomorrow's and
Sunday's games with the St.
Louis Browns. The team takes
off for an Eastern trip after
that.
Who are the candidates for the
job besides first base coach Ted
Lyons, currently the front runner?
* * *
SPIKE HAS indicated that a
man in the Tiger organization will
get the job and that would mean
the following are also candidates:
Coach Rick Ferrell, farm di-
rector Muddy Ruel, Buffalo
Manager Jack Tighe, a n d
Schoolboy Rowe, a travelling
troubleshooter .in .the . Tigers'
farm system.
Lyons declines to comment on
the situation. In fact he's ready
and willing to defend Rolfe.
* * *
GENERAL MANAGER Charlie
Gehringer, sitting in his office
after yesterday's game with the
Cleveland Indians was postponed
by a cloudburst, said a number of
fans had written letters defending
Rolfe.
"They didn't think it was
Red's fault," said Charlie. "As a
matter of fact, I don't think it
was either."
The cloudburst was one of the
most severe ever seen at Briggs
Stadium. It started about 2:10
p.m. and was aided by a driving
wind.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

AT ONE TIME the water cas-
caded in a small waterfall out of
the upper centerfield bleacers on-
to the field below. Right center
field became a small lake.
An effort was made to mop
up the field but the rain fell
again and the game was called
off.
The Tigers will pitch Ted Gray
and Virgil Trucks against Bob
Lemon and Early Wynn in today's
July 4th doubleheader.
M~ajor League
Standings

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO - Eddie Robinson
banged in seven runs with a pair
of homers and a single to fuse a
15 hit barrage yesterday that car-
ried the Chicago White Sox to a
12-3 nightcap victory and a
doubleheader sweep over the St.
Louis Browns.
The triumphs boosted the Sox
into second place in the American
League.
* * *
AS AN OPENER, the Sox won,
6-3, a game suspended since
April 27.
Robinson lashed out his sea-
son's 11th and 12th homers in
the regular game, each good for
three runs. He completed his
work in the eighth with a run-
scoring single that supported a
five-run inning. Sherman Lol-
lar belted his ninth homer of
the campaign in the big frame.
The first game was resumed
after a two months interruption
after five innings with the Sox
leading 3-1. Tommy Byrne walk-
ed four batters to give the Com-
iskeys their fourth run of the
game in the seventh. Lollar
brought Minnie Minoso home for
Chicago's fifth tally in the sev-
enth and Willy Miranda drove in
the last run in the eighth.
* * *
YANKS 9-4, SENATORS 6-6
WASHINGTON-The New York
Yankees and Washington slugged
it out to a draw yesterday in a
double-header.
The Yankees twice came from
behind with 4-run splurges in
the seventh and ninth innings to
grab the first game, 9-6, and the
Senators unleashed a 14-hit at-
tack to capture the second game,
6-4.
WASHINGTON advanced to
fourth place as Jackie Jensen,
former Yankees' outfielder, hit
safely in both games. He has bat-
ted safely in 20 consecutive games,
hitting .430 over that stretch.
The Senators carried a 6-5
lead into the ninth inning of
the opener. But the Yankees
blasted Don Johnson and Joe
Haynes for four runs.
Johnny Sai, fourth New York
pitcher, got the victory, his eighth,
as Bauer and Brown led the Yan-
kees' 14-hit assault with three hits
each.
THE PIERSALL INCIDENT
PHILADELPHIA-It came out
yesterday why rookie outfielder
Jim Piersall was demoted to the
minors by the pennant-hungry
Boston Red Sox.
Not that Piersall wasn't a good
ball player, Red Sox shortstop
Vern Stephens told a reporter, but
"because of a number of crazy
things that made our manager
mad."
* * *
AND WHEN Piersall spanked

NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn ... 48
New York .. 46
Chicago .... 40
St. Louis ... 41
Philadelphia 33
Cincinnati .. 32
Boston ..... 28
Pittsburgh .. 19

LEAGUE
L Pet. GB
21 .696 -
23 .667 2
32 .556 9V2
34 .547 10
37 .471 151 :
40 .444 17%/
44 .389 21 /
56 .253 32

CUSTOM
HAIRSTYLING
for Ladies!!
No Appointments Needed
Four Stylists
The Daseola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

Stephens' four-year-old son in the
Boston clubhouse last Friday
night "that was the. climax,"
Stephens reported, and manager
Lou Boudreau ordered Piersall
sent back to Birmingham of the
Southern Association.
Boudreau, himself, refused to
comment on the story, insisted
"The Piersall incident is closed"
but he didn't deny the report.
The story was reported first by
Ed Costello, sports editor of the
Boston Herald, Costello quoted
Boudreau:
* * *
"WHEN I HEARD (last) Satur-
day morning about the Piersall
incident with Stevie's son Friday
night, I knew that to prevent a
serious incident that might in-
volve Stevie and Piersall, it was
best to send Jim away."~
Stephens said he was "pretty
angry" when he heard about the
spanking, "as any father natur-
ally would be."
* * *
"THAT PIERSALL is a good
ball player but he needs to straigh-
ten himself out. He could be a
great player if he wouldn't do
such crazy things."
At New Orleans, Piersall ad-
mitted the spanking but "I
ain't got anything more to add."
Costello, in his story, quoted
Piersall: "During the game I did
go into the club house and Vern's
boy, a cute kid, was there. I
started fooling with him and I
guess I gave him a spank on the
seat of his pants that was a little
too hard because he started to cry.
"I kidded him then and asked
if he was all right. I have two
children of my own and wouldn't
for a minute stand for anyone in-
tentionally hurting them. I cer-
tainly didn't mean to hurt Stevie's
boy and told him so Friday night
and Saturday morning."

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Gray Kitten in vicinity of East
William and Thompson. Call No. on
his tag or bring to 512 E. William,
Back apt.
FOR SALE
EASY SPINDRIER-1949 Black Renault.
Mrs. Braun, 2-7232.
GIRL'S ENGLISH BICYCLE, 26 in., 3-
speed gear shift, basket, lock, used I
month, excellent condition. Call Vir-
ginia Eugene. Ph. 2-2591 at 1-2; 7-9
p.m.
ART SALE private collection, oils, water
colors, portfolios, books. 1918 Day,
Phone 2-1710.
ANTIQUE CHAIRS - 1 Hitchcock, 1
Duncan Fyfe, 1 arm Windsor, 1 comb
back Windsor. 1 tilt top table. Mis-
cellaneous objects: candle sticks,
lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph.
2-1710.
28" BOY'S Roadster bike and White
manual sewing machine. Ph. 3-1367
after 8:30 p.m.
FOR RENT
AVAILABLE -- A new 3-room de-
luxe apartment which accommodates
four. Completely furnished, electric
stove and refrigerator. Private en-
trance. $95 per month. Will rent for
summer. Need a car. Call 2-9020.
ATTRACTIVE APT. near Campus to
sublet July 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar-
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evenings.
FRATERNITY or sorority house for
rent, approved for twenty-five. Close
to campus. Write Box 17.
ROOMS FR RENT
4 STUDENTS-large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month. Also single room. 320 E.
Washington after 4 P.M.

Read and Use
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

I

i

Celebrate
this 4th weekend
at the VFW CLUB
* DANCING FRI. & SAT. NIGHTS
* TWO FINE ORCHESTRAS
* MARY LOU, VOCALIST

VOTO W-,

Members
and Guests

-.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 2, Boston 0
New York 4, Brooklyn 3
Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 1
St. Louis 4, Chicago 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at New York (2)--
Maglie (11-2) and Jansen (7-4)
or Lanier (2-4) vs. Roe (7-0)
and Erskine (7-2).
Philadelphia at Boston (2)-
Drews (4-8) and Heintzelman
(1-2) vs. Surkont (5-7) and
Bickford (2-9).
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati (2)
-Friend (3-11) and Main (2-6)
vs. Hiller (4-5) and Perkowski
(6-5).
Chicago at St. Louis (2)--
Klippstein (5-5) and Lown (3-5)
or Schultz (1-0) vs. Brazle (5-
1) and Boyer (4-4) or Staley
(10-6).
* * E
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Your Singing Host g Ph. 2-3972
-------HALL RENTALS & BANQUETS

1,

ROOMS FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE roomy apartment for 3
or 4 boys. Near campus. Call 3-1034
evenings, 5201 days.
OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
tions at The Campus Tourist Homes
now. 518 E. William. Phone 3-8454.
1 ROOM AP'T-Private bath, telephone,
summer only. $35 a month. Call
3-4785 evenings,
PERSONAL
COMPARE: your local newspaper-7c.
Time magazine at student rates-&c.
Phone 6007, Student Periodical.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED to Boston, Mass. or
Portland, Maine July 11. Can help
with driving. University extension
526, 8-5 weekdays, 2-8330 after 5:30
p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
TYPING-Reasonable rates. Accurate,
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 S. Main.
ALTERATION, Sewing. Mrs. Braun,
2-7232.
MENS' USED BIKES and used radios.
Ann Arbor Radio & T.V. 1215 So.
Univ., Ph. 7942. 132 blocks east of
East Engineering.
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T V
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1 ', blocks east of East Engin.
HELP WANTED
MAKE $20.00 DAILY -- Sell Luminous
Name Plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass., Free Sample and details.
ENGINEERING & PHYSICS
STUDENTS - SUMMER JOBS
Assisting engineers in development
work. Set up and testing of heating
equipment. Permanent positions open.
Mend resume and expected salary.
TIMKEN
Silent Automatic Division
209 W. Washington St.
Jackson, Michigan

I

Player and Club
Musial, St. Louis ..
Atwell, Chicago ..
Robinson, Brooklyn
Marshall, Cincin'ti.
Lockman, N.Y.
Slaughter, St. L ..+
Gordon, Boston
Cox, Brooklyn ..
Kluszewski, Cin.
Lowrey, St. L. ..

G
75
51
68
50
69
64
63
41
59
"65

AB
265
166
225
175
273
228
220
159
220
202

R
50
20
54
21
56
32
35
22
24
26

H
88
54
72
55
84
70
67
48
66
60

l

Fountain Pens
Greeting.Cards
Stationery
Office Supplies.
Typewriters
W/C Tape &
Wire Recorders
Steel Desks,
Chairs, Files
I
MORRIL 'S
314 S. State

I - -a

I

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
July 6-God
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
Sunday Evening Services will be discontinued during
the months of July and August.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.

HOME RUNS
Sauer, Chicago .................. 21
Hodges, Brooklyn ................ 16
RUNS BATTED IN
Sauer, Chicago ........... ..65
Thompson, New York ............ 62

New York
Chicago
Cleveland
Washington
Boston
Philadelphia
St. Louis
Detroit

W
41
41
39
37
38
29
32
23

L
28
33
32
32
33
34
41
47

Pct.
.594
.554
.549
.536
.535
.460
.438
.392

GB,
2 /
3
4
4
9
11
181/

Phone
7177

COOL

COOL

Open Saturdays until 1 P.M.

STARTING TODAY
THRU TUESDAY
IT SINGS, RINGS AND SWINGS
THROUGH THREE LOVES...THREE
WARS...AND THREE GENERATIONS!
-: <.

i

I

. Ray Anthony's
Band 0
(ancing runder
., the stars
Edgewater Park
o BALLROOM
Edgewater
Beach.
A West 7 Mile Rood

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 9-4, Washington 6-6
Chicago 6-12, St. Louis 3-3
Philadelphia 4, Boston 3
Cleveland at Detroit (Rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Washington (2)
-Reynolds (10-4) and Miller
2-3) vs. Marrero (7-2) and Gum-
pert (2-2).
Boston at Philadelphia (2)-
Parnell (4-5) and Nixon (2-2)
vs. Hooper (2-8) and Byrd
(4-8).
Cleveland at Detroit (2) -
Wynn (8-7) and Lemon (6-7)
vs. Trucks (3-9) and Gray (8-7).
St. Louis at Chicago (2) -
Pillette (6-5) and Holcombe
(0-6) vs. Rogovin (6-6) and
Kretlo (0-1).

DEPT. OF SPEECH
PRESENTS
TWELFT
NIGHT"
COMEDY - ROMANCE
Tonight Thru Sat.
8:00 P.M.

A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays,
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings
from 7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:30.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Minister-Leonard A. Parr
Student Work-Marilynn Paterson,
Robert Inglis
Director of Music-Harold Haugh
Organist-Howard R. Chase
10:45 A.M.: Junior Church in Douglas Memorial
Church,
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Subject of Dr. Prees-.
ton Slawson's will be "Jonah."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wngdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ),
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Associate Student Work Directors:
Marilynn Paterson, Robert Inglis
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon: "Author
of Liberty" by Rev. Joseph Smith.
Organist: Mrs. Roberta Martin;.Soloist: Mr.
Robert Martin.
Student Guild: Meet at Congregational Church at
6:00 P.M. for cost supper.
Program at 7:00: Dr. Kamal Khalifa from
Egypt will speak on problems in the Israel and
Trans-Jordan areas.
Marilyn Paterson and Robert Inglis, Student
Work Directors.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "What Really Constitutes Freedom?"
Sunday at 5:30: Lutheran Student Club Supper-
Program.
Wednesday at 9:00 P.M.: Annual Summer Session
Midweek Candlelight Vespers, "Pathways of
Paul."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Prof. J. Van Denbosch from Calvin College,
Grand Rapids, Mich.
7:30 P.M.; Evening Service, Prof. Van Denbosch

I

Adm. $1.20, 90c, 60c
MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE

i!

SUMMER HOURS 12:30 to 5:00
Closed Saturdays

.. 10:45 A.M.: "Two Words I Would Add to The
Good Samaritan Parable" Dr. Large preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper at the Canterbury
Club.
6:45 P.M.: Wesley Foundation students are
guests of the Canterbury Club. Prof. William
Alston of the Philosophy Dept. will speak on
"Christianity Reasonable."

I ruf T Suv - t 1

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