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June 28, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-06-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



SATURDAY, JUNE 28, 1952

T HE MICHIGAN IJAILY

PAGE THREE

woo

Musial, DiMaggio
Top All-Star Poll
Avila, Rizzuto, Kell, Dark Hold Slim
Margins as Voting Ends at Midnight
q* *

Six Meet Marks Broken
At Olympic Track Trials

LOS ANGELES--(P)-Art Bragg
of Morgan State won the blue rib-
bon 100 meter dash of the final
Olympic team tryouts today in
10.5 seconds as a powerful Amer-
ican squad shaped up for the
games at Helsinki amid a series
of record breaking performances.
Six meet records were set in
eight events, with Mal Whitfield's
time of 1:48.6 in the 800 meters
one of the brightest. This tied the
American record held by another
Olympic great, John Woodruff of
Pittsburgh.

CHICAGO-- (P)-- Balloting in
the All-Star Baseball Poll reached
a rousing climax last night with
four infield positions apparently
remaining to be determined in last
minute voting.
The 16 winners who will start in
the 19th interleague game at Phil-
adelphia July 8 will be announced
Sunday.
* * *
THREE OF the tight races were
in the American League and one
in the National. Bobby Avila,
Cleveland's Mexican born second
baseman, battled Nellie Fox, Chi-
cago White Sox, for the starting
honor, but it appeared certain
that Phil Rizzuto of the New York
Yankees would be selected to start
off at shortstop since his closest
rival, Chico Carrasquel, of the
White Sox, is shelved with a frac-
tured finger.
Aliva, polling 912,688 votes,
tops Fox by 31,469. Rizzuto, a
tremendous favorite in major
and minor league cities, collect-
ed 957,328 votes to pull away
from Carrasquel by 33,225.
Fox and Carrasquel were elect-
ed to starting positions in last
year's game at Detroit.
** *
CLEVELAND'S Al Rosen trails
George Kell, Boston Red Sox, by
11,122 votes, in the scramble for
the third base starting spot. Kell,
who started at third base in the
1951 game, has 951,446 votes.
In the National League's only
apparent close race, Al Dark,
New York Giants, has an ad-
vantage of 14,443 votes over
Gran Hamner, Philadelphia
Phillies, for the shortstop berth.
Dark, who won the shortstop
starting position last year, has
been chosen on 938,579 ballots.
' The individual vote getting lead
switched to Stan Musial, St. Louis
{ Cardinals, with a total to date of
1,077,854, with Dom DiMaggio,
Boston Red Sox center fielder,
dropping to second with 1,052,602.
* * *
THE COMPLETE National Lea-
gue team will be announced on
Monday and the full American
League squad on Tuesday. Casey
Stengel of the Yankees, and Leo
Durocher of the Giants, who led
their clubs in the world's series
last fall, will manage the rival
all-star squads.
The leaders:
Major Leag

STAN MUSIAL

Baseball Coaches Select
College Alil-A mericans

DOM DIMAGGIO
* * *
NATIONAL LEAGUE: Lock-
man, New York, 1B, 997,403; J.
Robinson, Brooklyn, 2B, 1,041,
918; Thomson, New York, 3B,
962,158; Dark, New York, SS,
938,579; Sauer, Chicago, LF, 1,-
018,312; Musial, St. Louis, CF,
1,077,854; Slaughter, St. Louis,
RF, 942,615; Campanella, Brook-
lyn, C, 958,392.
AMERICAN LEAGUE: E. Ro-
binson, Chicago, lB, 981,784;
Avila, Cleveland, 2B, 912,688; G.
Kell, Boston, 3B, 951,446; Riz-
zuto, New York, SS, 957,328;
Mitchell, Cleveland, LF, 982,-
974; DiMaggio, Boston, CF, 1,-
052,602; Bauer, New York, RF,
923,843; Berra, New York, C,
1,012,778.
First Co-rec
Draws_121
Attendance at the summer's first
co-recreation program at the In-
tramural Building reached 121 ac-
cording to co-rec director Newt
Loken.
The program will be held every
Friday at the I-M Building with
the exception of the Fourth of
July when all activities will be
closed.
A breakdown of last night's at-
tendance according to sports
shows: swimming, 65; badminton,
16; gymnastics, 20; basketball, 8;
table tennis, 8 and paddleball, 4.

EAST LANSING-()-The 1952
all-America college baseball team,
announced today by the American
Association of College Baseball
Coaches, was rated by many as
big league calibre.
More than half the college play-
ers selected for the first team al-
ready have signed professional
contracts.
* * *
THREE TEAMS of ten men
each, including twd pitchers, were
announced by John H. Bobs,
Michigan State baseball coach
and chairman of the association's
all-America committee.
The fourth annual all-Amer-
ica team members on the first
string combine a monumental
.372 batting average. The two
first string pitchers boast 2.01
and 1.95 earned run averages.
Duke University's Dick Groat,
a standout infielder who is now
playing shortstop for the Pitts-
burgh Pirates, was the only re-
peater from the 1951 all-America.
A brilliant defensive player, Groat
also hit .371 in the regular season.
His performance in the college
world series included errorless
baseball and a .333 batting aver-
age.
* * *
BECAUSE of a wealth of all-
America shortstops for the first
team, Groat drew the third base
slot.
Southern California's Hal
Charnofsky, also regularly a
shortstop, was shifted,to second
base. Wisconsin's Harvey Kuenn,
a .436 hitter, was given the all.
America shortstop berth.
Bill Werber Jr., of Duke, son of
the former major leaguer, com-
pletes the first string infield at
first base.
* * *
MATCHING Duke, Missouri,
runner-up in the college world
series, also placed two men on the
first team. They were Junie Wren,
named center fielder, and Don
Boenker, who drew one of the
pitching assignments.
The other first string pitcher
named was Jim O'Neil of Holy
Cross.
Boenker posted a 1.95 earned
run average in winning nine and
losing two in the regular season.
O'Neil put together a 2.01 earned

run average, winning nine and
losing one.
* * *
OTHER outfielders on the team
were Tom Keough of California, a
.400 hitter, and Jim Monahan of
Rutgers, who racked up a .404
batting average.
Baylor's Larry Isbell, a .386
bitter and star backstopper, won
the first team catching berth.
Charnofsky, Juenn, Groat, Is-
bell, Wren, Monahan and O'Neil
have signed big league contracts.
* * * .
TWENTY-THREE schools plac-
ed men on the 30-member all-
America squad. Missouri landed
three, and Duke, Southern Cali-
fornia, Holy Cross, Arizona and
Texas landed two each.
The complete all-America squad:
First team-lB, William Wer-
ber, Duke; 2B, Hal Charnofsky,
Southern California; SS, Harvey
Kuenn, Wisconsin; 3B, Dick Groat,
Duke; LF, Tom Keough, Califor-
nia; CF, Junior Wren, Missouri;
RF, James Monahan, Rutgers; C.
Larry Isbell, Baylor; P, Jim O'Neil,
Holy Cross, and Don Boenker, Mis-
souri.
Second team-1B, Gene Sheets,
Oklahoma; 2B, Dave Gottschalk,
Western Michigan; SS, Roger
Chadwick, Cornell; 3B, John Blan-
co, Manhattan; OF, Dwane Hel-
big, Oregon State, Stewart Hein,
Ohio State, and John Turco, Holy
Cross; C. Lloyd Jenney, Arizona;
P, Paul Giel, Minnesota, and Lu-
ther Scarborough, Texas.
Third team-1B, Don Blaha,
Northwestern; 2B, Ken Kurtz,
Missouri; SS, Joe Tanner, Texas;
313, Johnny Yvars, North 'Caro-
lina State; OF, Vail Taylor,C ol-
gate, Roger Johnson, Arizona, and
Jerry Dunn, Nebraska; C, Al Brod-
hag, Delaware; P, Joe Chez, Stan-
ford, and Tom Lovrich, Southern
California.
Kinder Faces
Bach Surgery
BOSTON-(')-The Boston Red
Sox announced yesterday that vet-
eran pitcher Ellis Kinder has been
placed on the disabled list for 30
days.
The steady right-hander who
has been of no use to the club re-
cently because of a sciatica fever
ailment, said he may be out of
action for the rest of the season.
He faces a back operation that
would require a 90-day recupera-
tive period.
"The best specialist in the
country told me it was the result
of wear and tear," he saitd. "I
can't bend over without a pain
like a knife shooting from my
right hip to my ankle.
Kinder, who has not pitched
for two weeks, was the Sox' ablest
relief hurler last year.
MICHIGAN'S
ULTRA MODERN
SHOP
AIR CONDITIONED
6 Barbers
U of M BARBERS
715 N. University

WHITFIELD is defending Olym-
pic champion at 800 meters and
will also try for the 400-meter
title. Only in the broad jump and
the 100-meterhdash did the 1952
performers fail to exceed the best
tryout marks ever made by Amer-
icans.
Upsets were the order of the
day. Milton Engel of New York
University and the Pioneer Club
surprised with the best hammer
throw of his life, 182 feet, 5
inches, beating Sam Felton, who
had 182.
Then Darrow Hooper of Texas
A. & M. threw the shot two feet
further than he had ever done
before to win at 57-1%, With Parry
O'Brien of Southern California
second at 57-%,. and the world
record holder, Jim Fuchs, ex-Yale,
barely qualifying at 56-11%.
* * *
CURTIS STONE, already a team
member at 10,000 meters, defeat-
ed Wes Santee, the highly regard-
ed Kansan, in the 5,000 meters
with a new American record of
14.27.0.
The first three men in each
event of the tryouts automati-
cally qualify for the team. A
crowd of 15,000 was on hand.
Tomorrow the balance of the
finals will be run off.
The quality of performances here
far exceed anything known in pre-
vious olympic team tryouts. In the
shot put, Bernie Meyer, formerly
New York University, failed to
make the team although he did
56-7%-better than the Olympic
record of 56-2 set in the 1948
games by Wilbur Thompson of the
U. S. A. Thompson today did 54-
5% and finished fifth.
IN THE JAVELIN Bill Miller of
the Navy Olympics hit 235-8% for
first place, closely pressed by Cy
Young of the Los Angeles A. C.
with 234-1%.
Meredith Gourdine, Cornell,
won the broad jump with 25-41,)
followed by Jerome Biffle, U. S.
Army, 25-2, and George Brown,
U. C. L. A., 25-11. Although he
made the team, this was Brown's
first defeat after 41 straight vic-
tories.
The 100-meter dash was a siz-
zler. In the first heat came the
first serious casualty of the day.
Jim Golliday of Northwestern, the
collegiate champion and a prime
favorite to win at Helsinki, pulled
up lame and finished last.
Charles Moore, formerly Cornell,
set another American record when
he won the 400 meter hurdles in
the sparkling time of :50.7, only
one-tenth of a second lower than
the world record. Lee Yoder of
Arkansas was second, and Ronald
Blackman of the U. S. Army took
third place from Bob Devinney of
Kansas, one of the favorites, who
collapsed as he crossed the finish
line.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 ..60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
FOR SALE
EASY SPINDRIER-1949 Black Renault.
Mrs. Braun, 2-7232.
GOOD SUMMER CAR - Clean, well
equipped 1947 Pontiac. Will trade or
sell reasonably. Call Huff 2-5644.
GIRL'S ENGLISH BICYCLE, 26 in., 3-
speed gear shift, basket, lock, used 1
month, excellent condition. Call Vir-
ginia Eugene. Ph. 2-2591 at 1-2; 7-9
p.m.
FOR RENT
AVAILABLE JULY 1-A new 3-room
deluxe apartment. Completely fur-
nished, electric stove and refrigerator.
Private entrance. $95 per month. wii
rent for summer. Need a car. Call
2-9020.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
tions at The Campus Tourist Homes
now. 518 E. william. Phone 3-8454.
4 STUDENTS-large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month. Also single room. 320 E.
Washington after 4 P.M.
HALF of Large Double Room in Grad.
House for rent to girl. Ph. 2-5232,
820 H4ll.
ATTRACTIVE roomy apartment for 3
or 4 boys. Near campus. Call 3-1034
evenings, 5201 days.
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD at a Co-op for $7.50 per week-
three meals a day at the following ad-
dresses: For Men: Nakamura Co-op,
807 N. State. For Women: Owen Co-
op, 1017 Oakland and Osterwein Co-op,
338 E. Jefferson. For information call
Luther Buchele, 7211, at the Inter
Co-op Council, 1017 Oakland.
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-To form car pool to Lansing
Friday evenings. Call 8565 7-9 p.m.
CALIFORNIA BOUND-Riders wanted
to share driving and expenses. Leave
July,15th. Phone 3-8119.

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick.:up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
TYPING -Reasonable rates. Accurate,
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 S. Main.
ALTERATION, Sewing. Mrs. Braun,
2-7232.
HELP WANTED
MAKE $20.00 DAILY - Sell Luminous
Name Plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass.. Free Sample and details,
MALE STUDENT to help with dog ken-
nel. Board, room and salary. Must
like dogs. Ph. Jim Norris 25-8865.
ENGINEERING & PHYSICS
STUDENTS - SUMMER JOBS
Assisting engineers in development
work. Set up and testing of heating
equipment. Permanent positions open.
Send resume and expected salary.
TIMKEN
Silent Automatic Division
209 W. Washington St.
Jackson, Michigan
PERSON with chemical background to
abstract patents. Part-time work to
be done at home. Ph. Mrs. Lotze
2-1871.

i'

for that
hard-to-find
T extbook
try
Folletts
State St. at N. UniY.

MEAL MARIT
"Serve Yourself the Best"
BREAKFAST 7-1 1 A.M.
LUNCH 11-1:30
DINNER 5-7 P.M.
CLOSED - Saturday Evening
and all day Sunday
338 MAYNARD STREET
"through the Arcade"

-.

IF

I 1

ue Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

W
New York .....36
Boston ........36
Cleveland .....36
Washington ....32
Chicago .......35
Philadelphia ...26
St. Louis ......30
Detroit ........21

L
24
29
30
28
31
31
36
43

Pct.
.600
.554
.545
.533
.530
.456
.455
.328

GB
2%/
3
4
4
8%/
9
17

NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn .....44
New York ....41
Chicago ......35
St. Louis ......35
Cincinnati ....29
Philadelphia ..27
Boston ........27
Pittsburgh ....17

LEAGUE
L Pct.
17 .721
20 .672
28 .556
33 .515
35 .453
35 .435
37 .422
50 .254

COOL

COOL

G.B.
10
12%/
16%/
17%/
18%
30

NOW SHOWING
Musical
\ Maneuver!

(does not include last night's games)

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
June 29-Christian Science
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
Sunday Evening Services will be discontinued during
the months of July and August.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings
from 7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:30.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCRf
State and E. William Streets.
Minister-Leonard A. Parr
Student Work-Marilynn Paterson,
Robert Inglis
Director of Music-Harold Haugh
Organist-Howard R. Chase
10:45 A.M.: Junior Church Chapel.
10.45 A.M.: Public Worship. Subject of Dr. Parr's
will be "What Do You See?"
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Breakfast discussion group. Pine
Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship: "Two Words I Would Add
to the Twenty-Third Psalm" Dr. Large preach-
ing.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship supper.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and program. "The Episco-
pal Address" Gene Ransom, discussion leader.
Welcome to the Wesley Foundation Rooms, open
daily!

ST. A-DREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North Division at Catherine
The Reverend Henry Lewis, 4D., Rector
The Reverend Ellsworth E. Koon4, Curate
The Reverend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communior
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.: Church School (Nursery-9th Grade).%
11:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Sermon by the
Rev. Dr. Lewis.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club Supper and infor-.
mal open house.
6:45 P.M.: Seminar on Christian Living.
8:00 P.M.: Evening Prayer.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ),
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Associate Student Work Directors:
Marilynn Paterson, Robert Inglis
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship, to be broadcast
over WPAG starting at 11:05 A.M. Sermon:
"The Search for Certainty" by Rev. Joseph
Smith. Organist: Mrs. Roberta Martin; Solo-
ist: Mr. Robert Martin.
Student Guild: Meet at Congregational Church at
6:00 P.M. for a cost supper. Mohammed
Hilmi speaks on tensions in Egypt today. Mari.
lynn Paterson and Robert Inglis, directors.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with Holy Communion.
Sermon by the pastor, "What is the Nature of
the Kingdom of God?"
Sunday at 5:30: Fellowship Supper, followed by
showing of "Hidden Treasures" and "We'll
Remember Michigan."

'

F

S

Correction:

Please note additional EVENING hours
of Round-up Room below.

The University of Michigan League
Welcomes

All Summer School Students

THE CAFETERIA

for Luncheon, Dinner, and Sunday Breakfast and Dinner

Open: Luncheon
Dinner

11:15 A.M. to 1:15 P.M.
5 P.M. to 7:15 P.M.

COOL COOL

Sunday Breakfast 9 A.M. to 11 A.M.

11 '16 #4 U ll

Sunday Dinner

12 Noon to 2:30 P.M.

I

I

ENDING TODAY

THE ROUND-UP ROOM
for Breakfast, Luncheon and Snacks

*I
Playing Saturday
"CROSS WINDS"
with JOHN PAYNE
osd RHONDA FLEMING

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
Rev. Henry Kuizengo, Minister Elect
Rev. John Bathgate, Minister to Students
9:30 A.M.: Bible Seminar
10:45 A.M.: Morning worship, Rev. Bathgate
preaching, "Great Possessions."
7:00-8:30 P.M.: Open House.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Phares Steiner, Organist
Small Children in Nursery.
11:00 A.M.: Sermon: Edward H. Redman "Loy-
alty to Self and Society.'
12:00 Noon: Meeting of Congregation.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth .Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music

1

10:45 A.M.: Sermon: "A Loving Faith."
Confirmation and reception of new members.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
,(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
ji Churches of Michigan)
Y Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leosard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Veduin. -

Open: Monday through

Thursday 7:15 A.M. to 5
7:15 P.M. to 10:30
7:15 A.M. to 5

P.M.
P.M.
P.M.

also

Friday
Saturday

7:15 A.M. to 2 P.M.

"WHERE DANGER
. LIVES" .l

I 4 AFAEl SABA~tN1 y
c Inr%I £fH U

CHURCH OF CHRISTmf
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium

.1I

w .

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