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August 10, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-08-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t

IAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, AUGUST 10, 1952

_______________________________________ I

.

CONTROLS PAKISTAN WATER SOURCES:
India Holds Key to Rich Punjab Farming Region
toda hold thkest Pkistan's
The es i ie are posses
PakHOiRand igaion sa sstem, on-he. :...I
ofthe world's lrgstcud.un-
today eysch Pakistan 's ood belt into a :
Pekst AN complains that In-h..:
daytampering withrad thenorad (f -~u
efl ofth water in Indiaf-he i
Kadsi andem onIdas ieo
the na fr onier, could t.rn A.........
graess deserot.di ninen-
tapering is.already.present and .. .
asarutther be s bece a t mak
t;4
edfall in he water levels ofte :,'
teIndus yise. and.ain.h0.
Iersning de the Ase nchgr- r/M
ges, butl meein Kianhi nen-- l/WA
tional oundtanbl e onerecesions, ..A L iCIT
stre nWashington susse and ,
fothe p obtes onnected thy
twvee Ilndi and Paistatn sche- i
repsentin. e two Ar.sianngh- ...
ausn pesdes theldebnk..They
Piveipansirandcnution sh oe-
dultewoin 'slthedst.River...basin.... :I N DIiii:
PAKISTAN aercopeitt Iend-HARP(~
the spctreaofstan forbethist new
nation
* * * ss dehert ":

Report Says
Food To Be
Scarce in '75
WASHINGTON-('k-ThS. pop-
ulation increased more than twice
as fast in the five years 1946-'50
as in depression 1936-'40.
In Western Europe, according
to the United Nations' 1951 demo-
graphic yearbook, only France had
a higher rate of increase, and
among those of the so-called back-
ward areas which keep birth and
death statistics only Ceylon ex-
ceeded the U.S. rate.
THE POPULATION Reference
Bureau, a private research organ-
ization, forecasts that if the U.S.
rate keeps up Americans may have
to do one of three things in about
1975 in order to eat as well as
they do now:
1. Make farms produce more.
2. Export less food.
3. Import more food.
The Bureau was established here
in 1929 through private contribu-
tions to collect and distribute pop-
ulation data. Robert Cook is act-
ing director.
In the 1936-'40 period the Unit-
ed States had 17.3 births per thou-
sand population and 11 deaths,
a net increase of 6.3 persons per
thousand.
In 1946-'50 there were 24.1
births and 9.9 deaths. Births had
increased, deaths decreased.
The population increase per
thousand in 1946-150 was 14.2-
which was 7.9 over the rate of
1936-'40, more than double.
The Bureau took figures on the
United States, seven Western Eur-
opean nations and 12 other areas
from the demographic yearbook
to find out how the U.S. popula-
tion rate compares with that of
the rest of the world.
The six with the greatest in-
crease in the post-war period over
the late depression years were:
Ceylon 10.6 per thousand, France
9.4, Puerto Rico 9.2, U.S. 7.9, Ja-
pan and Mexico 7.2 each.
DOWN THE LIST are nations
commonly thought to be increas-
ing their population much faster,
such as Malaya with 3.5 and Italy
with only one per thousand.
Cook says many people make
the mistake of watching birth
rates alone to estimate what is
happening to populations. He
cautions that deaths must be
considered to get the actual in-
crease-or decrease.
He says world population is in-
creasing at the rate of one per
cent a year.

DRIVING PROVIDES SURPRISES:
Tourists Find Paris Equals Expectations

By BARNES CONNABLE
Special To The Daily
PARIS-You've got a pretty good
picture of Paris without coming
here.
Everything is about as you ex-
pect. So if you're entertaining
wondrous dreams of a surprise a
minute you're in for a great dis-
appointment.
All the tourists do the same
things here. At night you go down
to the Place Pigalle, drink cham-
pagne and watch a floor show
which is as poorly rehearsed as
the girls are nude.
AT DAWN, you climb up a hill
and watch the sun come up over
Paris, which costs nothing and is
considerably more spectacular
than the pig alleys, "spectacles."
During the day, you drive up
the Champs Elysees to the Place
de r'Etoile and the Arc De Tr-
omphe, take an excursionto
NotreDame and ride the hair
raising elevator up the Eiffel
tower.
Then you leave and you can say,
"I've seen Paris." And the photo-
graphs are now memories.
Except for Rheims, famed for its
cathedral and the unconditional
surrender, the drive down here
through Belgium and Northern
France is not very scenic. You can
get the same effect in New Eng-
land and hilly sections of southern
Michigan.
ONE CONSOLATION is that the
topography discourages the bicycle
menace. But it is quickly replaced
by a new and more terrible op-
ponent-the French driver.
Now, you can't help liking the

Frenchman. Unlike the Dutch-
man's roadside stare, his dis-
tant greeting is a smile and a
friendly wave. But once he gets
behind the wheel -he becomes a
formidable enemy.
The little cars that scurry along
the countryside we call "bugs."
They not only resemble oversized
insects, they have an amazing
propensity to shoot by you from
the direction you least expect.
You also become acquainted in
short order with the non-sym-
phonic version of the French horn.
The "bug-tooter" is almost as
high-pitched and terrifying as the
engine whistles over here.
AS YOU TRAVEL toward Paris,
the methods of struggling with
traffic become increasingly clear.
The French hit their horns like
itchy-fingered triggermen at ev-
ery intersection and whenever
something moves a hundred yards
over in the brush.
This gets to be quite severe on
the nerves, but it can't compare
with the shock you receive with
the discovery that these little
horns are used instead of brakes.
And when you reach Paris, you
find out the huge, courageous
buses use neither.
The next best thing to carnival
bump cars is a ride around the
Arch of Triumph. The proud own-
ers of wagging, illuminated turn-
ing indicators are absolutely posi-
tive they aren't going to get hit.
The rest are willing to gamble.
And eventually you realize that
to get onto your street, you your-
self are obliged to dart through
the metal concentric circles.

Strangely enough, while everyone
thinks he has the right of way
in Paris, very few people get hurt.
AFTER ONE DAY of extricat-
ing himself from the Parisen au-
tomobile stranglehold, the tourist
is a hardened, merciless veteran.
He has finally grasped that the )
road to survival is a fast and ag-
gressive one.
This is a major part of Paris,
because to enjoy the beauty of
the city you have to get places.
Once you get there, you're well
satisfied it's all that it's cracked
up to be.
Paris is a new experience in the
sense that a walk along the Seine
and the view from the Eiffel Tow-
er can't really be captured on the
motion picture screen.
But you've seen most of it in-
directly and when you do get your
first on-the-scene glimpse of the
historic palace at VersaillesIn-
stead of sighing, you're more l1k-
ely to murmur as we did, "Well,fni
by God, there it is."
Prof. Litzenberg A
ReceivesFuibright
Prof. Karl Litzenberg of the
English Department has been ap-
pointed the first Fulbright fellow
to study in the field of Scandina-
vian literature in Denmark.
Serving as a Fulbright research
professor at the University of Cop-
enhagen, Prof. Litzenberg will con-
duct studies on the reception and
impact of the major Victorian
writers in Scandinavia in the 19th
and 20th centuries.

SO LONG as India controls the
source of Pakistan's vital water
supply she controls this country's
economy and its future survival as
a nation," said one Pakistani lead-
er. "We cannot rest until there is
an iron-clad agreement protecting
the water supply for our irrigation
system."
Five great rivers-The Jhe-
lum, the Chenap, the Ravi, the
Sutlej, and the main stream of
the Indus-run through Pakis-
tan. Eventually they join and
enter the sea south of Karachi
through the great Indus Delta.
Because of these rivers, all snow-
fed from the Himalayas, this re-
gion of West Pakistan has devel-
henea Appointed
To Purdue Faculty
Prof. Paul F. Chenea, of the en-
gineering college has been appoint-
ed professor of engineering me-
chanics and research profressor of
materials at Purdue University.
The appointment will become
effective Sept. 1.
. . *
PROF. Chenea will have charge
of all instructional and research
work in engineering mechanics.
He has been in the University
faculty since 1946.

oped into one of the richest wheat
and cotton growing areas of all
Asia.
But agricultural production vi-
tal to this country's economy is
possible only through intensive ir-
rigation. Water for this irrigation
flows through Indian-held Kash-
mir and Indian Punjab to reach
the fields of West Pakistan.
The Punjab, the Northwest
Frontier provinces and Sin are
all uncertain rainfall areas, with
one year in five expected to be
dry and one in ten a year of
severe drought.
Eighty percent of Pakistan's 76
million people depend on agricul-
ture to live, and with natural rain-
fall uncertain most of them look
to irrigated land for full cup-
boards and full stomachs.
* * *
BEFORE PARTITION of India
into India and Pakistan, plans for
construction of a series of major

dams in the Himalayas had been
outlined. In some cases construc-
tion actually had been started.
But with partition it became
apparent that the dams all fell
within India, while most of the
canals and headworks they were
designed to feed lay in Pakistan.
India controlled the water taps
but the pipelines were all in
Pakistan.

Should India decide to turn off
those taps, she is in a position to
do so, say worried Pakistanis here.
Those who charge India with
tampering with the flow of water
into the Punjab paint an awful
picture of what could happen to
Pakistan's food supply. These fears
have highlighted demands here for
a quick and fair solution of the
whole Kashmir problem.

Last Week of, Removal
, SAVE
/ \\

S

Save up to 0
on Helena Rubinsteins
Beauty Pairs!
at

I

'

112 and more

Examination Schedule
In Eight-Week Courses

at

Time of Class Meeting
8:00 a.m.
9:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
1:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00O p.m.
Other hours

Time of Examination
8:00 a.m., Thursday, August 14
8:00 a.m., Friday, August 15
2:00 p.m., Thursday, August 14
2:00 p.m., Friday, August 15
4:00 p.m., Thursday, August 14
10:00 a.m., Thursday, August- 14
10:00 a.m., Friday, August 15
4:00 p.m., Friday, August 15

on your Vacation
Clothes and Wearables
for seasons to come.

-;'j

PAY FOR ONE...GET ONE FREE!
-LIMITED TIME ONLY

i

S. State off N. U.
After Sept. 1 --
S. Forest off S. U.

America' s
asked-for
brasslerc.*..

/ 1
(9t
1- *1t

2 for Aging Skin
"Pasteurized" Night Cream
plus "Herbal" Extrait. Com-
bination value, 2.38.
BOTH FOR ONLY 14.0.
2 for Eye Beauty
Waterproof Mascara plus Eye
Cream Special. Combination
value, 2.00.
BOTH FOR ONLY 1.00.
2 for Dry Skin
"Pasteurized" Face Cream
Special plus Skin Lotion Spe-'
cial. Combination value, 1.88.
BOTH FOR ONLY 1.25.
2 for Oily Skin
"Pasteurized"Face Cream plus
Beauty Washing Grains. Com-
bination value, 1.70.
BOTH FOR ONLY 1.25.
2 for Coarse Pores
Deep Cleanaer plus "Herbal"
Skin Lotion. Combination val-
ue, 2.00.
BOTH FOR ONLY 1.50.

2 for "Lifeless" Hair
Silk Sheen Cream Shampoo
plus Headliner. Combination
value, 1.50.
BOTH FOR ONLY 1.00.
2 for Daintiness
Heaven-Sent Eau De Toilette
plus Heaven-Sent Deodorant
Cream. Combination value,
1.85. BOTH FOR ONLY 1.25.
2 for All-Day Make-Up
Silk-Tone Foundation plus
Silk-Screen Face Powder.
Combination value, 2.00.
BOTH FOR ONLY 1.50.
2 for Perfuming
Command Performance Eau
De Parfum plus Cologne Stick.
Combination value, 2.55.
BOTH FOR ONLY 1.75.
2 for Body Freshness
PerfumeSpray Deodorantplus
WhiteMagnolia CologneStick.
Combination value, 2.05.
BOTH FOR ONLY 1.25.

COATS
Group of navy, black,
grey, red, pastel & tweed
coats - originally were
49.95 to 69.95 now 25.00
to 39.95.
Group of shorter wool
coats. Rain or shine rayon
tweeds and gabardine -
original values to 39.95
now 14.95 to 19.98.
Groups of ottoman faille
long and short coats.
7.00 to 14.98
DRESSES
at 10.00 and 14.98
Original prices 14.95 to
39.95. Better dresses of
all kinds-evening, after-
noon and street dresses.
Laces. chiffons. taffetas.

SUITS
25.00 to 39.95. Groups
of 100% wool suits most-
ly dark fall shades and
black. Sizes 10 to 38, 12
to 241/2, originally were
from 49.95 to 69.95.
SUITS
10.00 and 14.98
Originally were 25.00 to
29.95 . . . of famous na-
tionally advertised makes,
of rayon and wool; plus
other sharkskin and rayon
lined suits. Sizes 9-15,
10-20, 12 to 241.
SKIRTS
2.98 - 3.98 - 5.98
Originally were to 12.95.
Cottons, rayons, wools ...
sizes 24-30.
R I MlAIqlC

HANDBAGS
Group of straws at
98C
Groups of plastic & leath-
er straphandles and over-
shoulder bags-1.98 to
5.00. Originally were 2.95
to 10.95.
SLIPS
Beautiful nylon lavishly
lace trimmed 3.98, 5.00.
Rayon slips 1.98 and'2.98.
Sizes 32-46, 31 to 391/2.
GLOVES
Stripe shartex navy or
black and white - odds
and ends in all color cot-
ton fabrics and string .
at 98c

A

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-E TTNE
7k04BR

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Basic fashions like this call for the wonderful V-Ette. It's de-

All prices plus federal tax except Silk She en Creac Sham poo.

I

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