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August 07, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-08-07

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x

THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1952

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

____________________________________________________________________________________ U

Report Heavy Advance
Sale of Football Tickets

Major League1
' Standings

Reveal Alumni Donation
To Fourteen at Brown

ILLINI T EAM TO BEAT:
November Is Crucial 'iVI' Grid Month

'I-

A sharp rise in-season ticket or-
ders for Michigan's six home foot-
ball games this fall yesterday
prompted Wolverine Ticket Man-
ager Don Weir to remind fans that
the season ticket priority deadline
is next Sunday, August 10. -
Pre-season orders have started'
coming in at such a rate as to
equal or surpass last year's fig-
ures, Weir said. He urged prospec-
tive purchasers to place their or-
ders immediately to meet the pri-
ority deadline. Applications post-
marked Sunday, August 10, will be
accepted for priority.
* * *
CURRENTLY the Michigan-
Michigan State game, September
27 leads all games in total sales
but the Michigan-Minnesota con-
test, October 25 and the Michigan-
Illinois clash, November 1, are be-
ginning to push the Wolverine-
Spartan contest.
A surprising demand for tick-
ets to the Michigan-Indiana
game, October 11, which has
been designated "high school
band day" also has been noted,
Weir said. Last year more than
6,000 high school bandsmen
took part in half-time ceremo-

NATI

ONAL
W

nies at the Wolverine-Hoosier
contest, and plans call for boost-
ing this number to nearly 7,000.
Last year the Michigan-Michi-
gan State game drew a total of
96,541 spectators into the 97,239-
capacity Wolverine stadium. Com-
pared to the same date last year
orders for the game are ahead of
1951, Weir said.
THE SEASON ticket sales in-
cludes contests with Michigan
State, September 27; Indiana, Oc-
tober 11; Minnesota, October 25;
Illinois, November 1; Cornell, No-
vember 8, and Purdue, November
15.
Away games this year are with
Stanford at Stanford, October 4;
Northwestern at Evanston, Octo-
ber 18 and Ohio State at Columbus,
November 22.
DID YOU KNOW: That three of
the ten Wsetern Conference foot-
ball coaches are graduates of the
University of Michigan? In addi-
tion to Bennie Oosterbaan, Wis-
consin's Ivan Williamson and Io-
wa's Forest Evashevski won letters
in football.

Brooklyn .. .66
New York ..61
St. Louis . ..59
Philadelphia 54
Chicago ....52
Boston .....42
Cincinnati ..43
Pittsburgh ..30
* *
AMERICAN
W
New York ..63
Cleveland ..:60
Boston .....55
Washington 54
Philadelphia 51
Chicago ....54
St. Louis ....44
Detroit .....36

LEAGUE
L Pct.
31 .680
37 .622
44 .573
47 .535
51 .505
58 .420
62 .410
77 .280
*
LEAGUE
L Pct.
43 .594
47 .561
46 .545
49 .524
48 .515
53 .505
63 .411
68 .346

G.B.
5 ,
10
14
14
251 /
27
41
G.B.
3'/
5%/
7
8',
9%/
19%/
26

PROVIDENCE, R. I. - (P) - A
group of Brown University alumni
unofficially donated $2,800 for tui-
tion aid to fourteen university
football players who have been
declared ineligible for the 1952
season it was reported yesterday.
A person who asked not to be
identified said university officials
did not know the money was be-
ing credited to the tuition ac-
counts of the players.
a, . *
THE SOURCE further said that
$200 of the fund was earmarked
for each player (who never hand-
led any cash) to complete pay-
nents on the $600 a year tuition.
Each of the players already had a

regular university scholarship
amounting to $400 it was said.
A spokesman at Brown said,
"No comment" when asked about
the report.
As for the effect of the suspen-
sions on Brown's football outlook,
Coach Alva T. Kelley's only com-
ment was, "Any team that ,loses
fourteen men is certain to be af-
fected."
THE REPORT said that nine of!
last year's freshmen and five up-
perclassmen were involved.
The incident at Brown Univer-
sity comes almost one year to the
day after the expulsion of ninety
West Point cadets on charges of
violating the Academy's academic
honor code.

I

CLASSIFIEDS

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday Is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST - During first week of summer
school - small gold watch initials
"MCT". Reward. Telephone Mary
Towle at 6722.
FOR SALE
ANTIQUE CHAIRS - 1 Hitchcock, 1
Duncan Fyfe, 1 arm Windsor, 1 comb
back Windsor. 1 tilt top table Mis-
cellaneous objects: candle sticks,
lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph.
2-1710
ART SALE private collection, oils, water
colors, portfolios, books. 1918 Day.
Phone 2-1710.
HOUSE TRAILER--1 wall with built in
book case. 30 ft. "cozy-coach". has
natural wood finish throughout, elec-
tric refrigerator, electric bot water
heater. Very liberal terms. Can be
seen at 410 E. Jeff.
FOR SALE-Silver Tint Mouton Coat,
% length. Almost new. 1028 Stock.
well.
STRADIVARIOUS VIOLIN, case, in fine
condition. Call 2-1661, 7 to 10 a.m.
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER-Smith-Cor-
ona Skywrite, like new. Call 3-1511,
Ext. 2841.
WHOOPEE-we're back with our August
quota of student specials. So sorryto
have been quiet but we wuz swamped
with orders in July. Once again we
offer Time at $3.00 per yr.: 6c each-
cheaper than your daily newspaper.
Life at $4.00; and many more. Just
phone 6007 and place your order. Stu-
dent Periodical Agency.
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER-Remington
Rand. Phone Uni. extension 320.
FOR RENT
AVAILABLE - A crew 3-room de-
luxe apartment which accommodates
four. Completely furnished, electric
stove and refrigerator Private en-
trance. $95 per month Will rent for
summer. .Need a car. Call 2-9020.
NEAR CAMPUS - Unfurnished 4 room
ap't-tile bath, no heat nor utilities.
Has stove and refrigerator. No pets.
School-age child preferred. $95. Ph.
6465.
LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS with kit-
chen privileges for 3 or 4 men stu-
dents. Also, senior law student who
has occupied apartment for 2 years
wishes to share. Graduate preferred.
1026 Oakland, phone 2-8269.
MALE STUDENT to share basement
ap't; good location. Private room. $30
per mo. Ph. 5830.

FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE APT near Campus to
sublet July 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar-
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evenings.
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
tions at rhe Campus Tourist :iomes
now. 518 E. William Phone 3-8454.
4 STUDENTS-large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month Also single room 320 14.
-Washington after 4 P.M
CAMBRIDGE 1430-1 double, 1 single
for men.
ROOMS FOR FALL - 906 Greenwood
apartment, double & singles. Refrig-
erator privileges, hollywood beds, De-
troit landlord. Call Jack Bergstrom
2-7108 or write Stu Hertzberg, 1-7617
Ohio, Detroit, Mich.
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate.
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 8. Main.
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and At washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
ALTERATIONS - Woman's garments.
Prompt service. Catherine St. near
State. Call A. Graves, Ph. 2-2678.
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T V
'Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1% blocks east of East Engin.
ALTERATIONS on ladies garments re-
serve for future use. A. Graves.
Phone 2-2678.
HELP WANTED
INTERVIEWERS for part time opinion
surveys. College background preferred,
not essential. Experience not neces-
sary. Answer fully. Box 18.
EARN MONEY at opening of Fall semes-
ter by working in spare time. Men
and coeds needed. Phone 6007.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED to Kallispell, Mont.
Leave about Aug. 11. Phone 7138.
2 or 3 RIDERS WANTED-Driving to
Kansas City, Missouri. August 1 or 2.
References: exchange phone 2-3006 be-
tween 6 and 7 p.m.
RIDERS WANTED to San Diego, Calif.
Leave Aug. 15th. References exchang-
ed. Call 8177, ask for Norm Rost.
RIDER WANTED-New York to Pitts-
burgh August 21 or 22. Will continue
on to Ann Arbor August 24. Phone
6469 between 6 and 10 p.m.
RIDER WANTED-To Washington D.C.
August 19 or 20. Phone 2-6654.
WANTED TO RENT
DESIRABLE TENANT - Grad. student
needs small apartment. Ph. 2-7857
-- ,

Panel Cites
Big Issues
of election
(Continued from Page 1)
THE TWO state chairmen rein-
forced the arguments of their co-
speakers. Cleary emphasized the
need for a better policy in Korea.
"Young men will be forced to
forego their proposed plans for
the future in order to engage in
military activity that was need-
less and can be shortened if
proper policies are applied," he
said.
Talking on corruption and
waste, he commented that the
GOP had been out of office for 20
years and was eager to clean the
present situation up.
* * *
AGREEING that "it is recog-
nizable that the Republicans want
to get into office," Staebler said
that the central question was
whether they Adeserved to get in.
In his opinion, they don't have
a case.
Concentrating on the theme
"we've never been so prosper-
ous," he attacked the GOP
charges of socialism.
Meader charged that "the Ad-
ministration has existed in one
crisis after another" and laid the
blame for Russian strength on
agreements made at Yalta and
Potsdam.
* * *
,THE QUESTION and answer
period brought up further ques-
tions on domestic and foreign
problems. When asked if he
thought the farm program was
socialism Meader replied that it
was not "unless it goes too far."
Answering a question on the
Yalta decisions, Dawson main-
tained that there was not an
American alive "who was pre-
pared to drive the Russians out
of Eastern Europe in 1945."
Challenged on specifics in clean-
in gup extravagance, Meader ex-
plained how one investigating
committee had discovered nearly
half a billion in military waste.
THE TOUCHY civil-rights ques-
tion, which had not been men-
tioned during the speeches, came
up when one member of the aud-
ience queried Staebler about
Sparkman's record on civil rights
and its likely affect on the Demo-
cratic vote.
Staebler commented that
Sparkman had helped draft the
party platform on this issue, and
expected that more specific de-
clarations would be heard from
him later in the campaign. He
called the vice-presidential can-
didate one of the new "South-
ern liberals."
Questioned on state FEPC,
Cleary explained that Michigan
Republicans were against the
measure because they "did not
feel it was broad enough." He
added that "equal opportunities
legislation" was included in the
state platform.
The final question concerned
the Demicratic stand on reforms
of the controversial Taft-Hartley
Labor Act. "We would start all
over again with that," Staebler
commented tersely.

(Continued from Page 2)
openings in its Business Training Course
for August graduates from among the
fields of Business Administration, Lib-
eral Arts, and Engineering. rhe train-
ing program leads to positions in the
Finance, Sales Promotion and Publicity,
Market Research, Community and Em-
ployee Relations, Sales, and General
Management activities. A bulletin with
full details may be'seen at the Bureau
of Appointments.
The Shreveport Child Guidance Cen-
ter, Shreveport, Louisiana, has a position
available in the Mental Hygiene Clinic
located in the E. A. Conway Memorial
Hospital in Monroe, Louisiana. This js
a State Operated Clinic supported also
by Federal funds. The need is for a
Psychiatric Social Worker.
The Electric Auto-Lite Company, Bay
City, Michigan, has an opening for an
Electrical Engineer for work in connec-
tion with maintaining the quality of
automotive horns. Laboratory testing,
analysis of difficulties arising in manu-
facture, and similar related work are
the main phases of the job.
The J. I. Case Company, Racine, Wis-
consin, is interested in hearing from
men who would like to enter its train-
ing program. Company manufactures
farm equipment. The company employs
graduates for the following positions:
Production, Metallurgical control and
development, Industrial Engineering,
Engineering, Accounting, Sales, and In-
dustrial Relations.
For complete details on all positions
publicized come to the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3528 Administration Build-
ing, or call extension 371.
Lectures

Student Recital. Donald Jackson, stu-
dent of piano with Benning Dexter, will
be heard at 8:30 Thursday evening, Au-
gust 7, in the Rackham Assembly Hall,
in a program of compositions by Bach,
Bartok, Beethoven, Brahms, and Cho-
pin. Presented in partial fulfillment of
the requirements for the degree of3
Master of Music, the recital will be
open to the public.
Exhibitions
Museum of Art, Selections from the
Permanent Collection.
General Library. Dictionaries.
Museum of Archaeology. Ancient
Egypt and Rome of the Empire.
Museums Building. Rotunda exhibit.
Some museum techniques.
Michigan Historical Collections, 160
Rackham Building. The changing Cam-,
pus.
Clements Library. American books
which have influenced the modern mind
(through September 1).
Architecture Building. Student work.
Events Today
The Summer School Council in con-
nection with the Women's League is
holding duplicate bridge session this
evening beginning at 7:30. Try to bring
your own partner.The room will be
posted in the League.
Carillon Recital, Professor Percival
Price, University Carillonneur, 7:15
8:00 p.m.
Opera, presented by the School of
Music and the Department of Speech.
The Merry Wives of Windsor, by Otto
Nicolai. 8:00 p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater.
The International Center's Weekly
Tea, for Foreign Students and American
Friends, Thursday 4:30 to 6 o'clock,
Recreational Swimming-Women Stu-
dents: The Union Pool will be open to
women for recreational swimming this
evening from 7:30 to 9:30.
Meeting of the U of M Sailing Club,
Thursday, August 7, at 7:30 p.m. in th
Union. Discuss Putin Bay Regatta and
Weekend plans at Whitmore.
Coming Events
There will be an informal record
dance Friday evening in the League
Ballroom. Dancing is from 9 p.m. to
midnight and the admission is free to
students.
The Fresh Air Camp Clinic will be
held at the camp on Patterson Lake,
Friday, August 8, at 8:00 p.m. Dr. Ra-
Binovitch, Assoc. Prof. of Psychiatry:
in Charge of Children's Service, Neur-
psychiatric Institute, will be the dis-
cussant.
Friday and Saturday, August 8 and 9:
Michael Redgrave, Margaret Lockwood
in Alfred Hitchcock's "The Lady Van-
ishes." Also Pare Lorentz's "The River,"
"The Loon's Necklace" and W. C.
Fields Comedy. Architecture Auditori-
um. Admission 50c. Complete shows
start at 6:00; 7:15; and 9:30 p.m.
Examination Schedule
In Six-Week Courses

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

By IVAN KAYE
Michigan will face Illinois on
the first of November at the sta-I
dium in the one game which in
largest measure will determine the1
outcome 'of the conference season
for the Wolverines. ,
Illinois is the team to beat in,
1952. Only twice in fifty-five years
of Big Ten football competition
have the Illini won the confer-
ence championship two years in,
succession. They did it in 1918-19
and again in 1927-28, both times
under the coaching of Bob Zupke.
WITH TWENTY-ONE seasoned
veterans returning from last year's
undefeated Rose Bowl champs
Coach Ray Eliot's crew is going,
to be mighty tough to de-throne.
Defense was the key to suc-
cess for the Orange and Blue
last season. The Illini held Mi-
chigan, Ohio State, Northwest-
tern and Indiana scoreless Wis-
consin got ten points and Iowa
managed two touchdowns while
absorbing a 40-13 drubbing.
Illini linebackers Chuck Boerio,
Elie Popa and Joe Cole were prime
factors in that enviable defensive
record. Tough as it was to make
yardage against Illinois on the
ground, it was much tougher to
pass against such stalwart de-
fensive halfbacks as Al Brosky,
Herb Neathery and Stan Wallace.
Wallace nabbed one of Gary Ker-
korian's stray aerials in the Rose
Bowl game to turn the contest in-
to a rout for the Illini. Brosky will
captain this year's squad.
ALL IS NOT rosy on the Cham-
paign campus however, since
Coach Eliot must come up with a
successor to the graduated All-
American halfback, Johny Karras.
The burden will probably fall on
Clarence DeMoss, a 178 pound
sophomore who saw some action
last year.
Aside from DeMoss the back-
field is set to go with Tommy
O'Connell, at quarterback, Pete
Bachouros at left halfback and
. All-America candidate Bill Tate
at fullback.
The big replacement problem is
at the linebackers. However, with
a talented crop of freshmen Eliot
should be able to fill even these
pressing vacancies.
* * * .
FOR THE past two years Mi-
chigan-Illinois games have borne
a remarkable similarity. In both
games the blizzardy weather was
the dominant factor, and in both
games it took only one touchdown
to win. Unfortunately for the
Maize and Blue, the Illini got both
touchdowns.
In the 1950 game here in Ann
Arbor the Illini scored just a
minute or so from the end of the
first half. Last year at Memorial
Stadium in Champaign they
scored with only a minute re-
maining in the game. Both
times the touchdown w a s
achieved through the use of
forward pass plays.
Over the years Illinois has not
been too successful in their ef-
forts against Michigan. They have
managed to beat the Wolverines
twelve times, but have been on the
losing end on twenty-five occa-
'sions.
MICHIGAN WILL get a decided

break in the schedule because
while the Maize and Blue will play
Minnesota the week before the
Illinois contest, the Illini must
tangle with top contender Purdue.
The tussle with the Boilermakers
will undoubtedly take something
out of the defending champions.
Michigan won't have a picnic
against the Gophers, but Minne-
sota in 1952 should be, a much
weaker team than Stu Holcomb's
Purdue. (
Cornell will follow Illinois in-
to Ann Arbor to give Michigan
a welcome respite from the rig-
ors of Big Ten competition.
The Ivy-Leaguers were supposed
to roll over and play dead when
the Wolverines invaded Ithaca
last autumn. The Maize and Blue
had lost to Illinois by a touch-
down the preceding week, but the
high caliber of their play had
made them solid favorites to beat
the Big Red.
* * *
CORNELL WAS dead during
the first half, but after the inter-
mission the Ithacans put on a
furious three touchdown rally
that swept them to victory.
The loss to Cornell was the
eleventh for Michigan in a ser-
ies which dates back to 1892.
The Wolverines have only been
able to whip the Big Red live
times. Thus Cornell holds with
Army the distinction of being
the only school to have a series
edge on Michigan. Army holds
four victories in the four games
played thus far between the two
teams.
Coach Lefty James is faced with
a tremendous rebuilding job. He
lost twenty-five lettermen, vir-
tually his entire offensive and de-
fensive first strings. The schedule
is no'comfort either what with
Navy, Princeton and Pennsylvania
to be faced.
MICHIGAN IS primed for re-
venge and unless Coach James can
pull material out of a hat this
may be a lean season "Far Above
Cayuga's Waters."
If Cornell is going to be easier
for Michigan than it was last
year, the Purdue tussle on the
following Saturday here in Ann
Arbor will more than make up
for it.
Purdue is tremendously improv-
ed and is looking forward to a
banner season.
WITH TWENTY-NINE letter-
men returning and an All-Ameri-
ca candidate in quarterback Dale
Samuels, Coach Stu Holcomb has
reason to believe some of the

flattering press notices the Boiler-
makers have been getting con-
cerning the coming season.
It is hard to make some fans
realize that Purdue has really
got the guns this time to blast
the champion Illini from the top
of the heap. Too many remem-
ber the 1948 squad which was
highly touted, lost to Notre
Dame in the season's first game
28-27, and then fell completely
to pieces and lost seven games
in a row.
This time, however ,with five
tackles weighing over 210 and a
powerful running fullback in Max
Schmaling, the lads from West
Lafayette appear ready for all
comers.
HERE, AS with the Illini, Mi-
chigan will get a break from the
schedules. In the month preced-
ing their meeting with the Wol-
verines Purdue will play Notre
Dame, Illinois, Michigan State and
Minnesota. After a month like
that the edge of the sharp Boiler-
maker offense may be slightly
dulled.
Ohio State is embarking on
the 1952 season with several ma-
jor liabilities, not the least of
which is the loss of Vic Jano-
wicz, the "One Man Gang"
through graduation. The Bucks
are going to continue Coach
Woody Hayes' switch from the
single wing to the "T" forma-
tion. This switch was sharply
criticized last season by the
"High Street Quarterbacks" be-
cause they felt that Janowicz's
triple threat ability was better
utilized in the single wing.
Anyone who witnessed the Ohio-
Michigan game will agree with
them.
The Buckeyes will again close
their season with Illinois and Mi-
chigan. They haven't been able to
subdue both squads in one year
since 1944, and no one is betting
that they will be able to do- it
this time either.

COOL

COOL

TODAY & FRIDAY

t

Linguistic Forum. "Words in
cics." Hans Sperber, Professor of
man, Ohio State University. 7:30
Rackham Amphitheater.

Poll-
Ger-
p.n.,

Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Paul Ray-
mond Barker, Physics: thesis: "Cosmic
Ray Electrons at Altitudes from Sea
Level to 14,000 Feet," Thursday, August
7, 2038 Randall Lab., at 2:00 p.m. Chair-
man, W. E. Hazen.
Doctoral Examination for Glen Rus-
sell Rasmussen, Education; thesis: "The'
Relationship between the Teacher's
Membership in Informal Groups and
his Potential for Feelings of Profes-
sional Failure," Friday, August 8, 1439
University Elementary School, at 10:00
a.m. Chairman, A. F. Zander.
Orientation Seminar (mathematics):
Thursday, August 7, at 3:00 p.m. In 3001
Angell Hall. Mr. Robinson will discuss
Fermat's theorem for n-3, 4.
Seminar in Mathematical Statistics:
Thursday, August 7, at 4:00 p.m. in
room 3201 Angell Hall. Professor Dwyer
will speak,
Concerts
Student Recital Postponed: David
Helm, pianist, whose recital was sched-
uled for 8:30 Wednesday, August 6, has
postponed the program until 4:15
Tuesday afternoon, August 12, in the
Rackham Assembly Hall.
Carillon Recital by Pervical Price,
University Carillonneur, will be heard
in another of the series of summer reci-
tals at 7:15 Thursday evening, A ugpst 7.
It will include the "Glockenspiel" Toc-
cata for Carillon, Air in D, In Thee is
Joy, and Sheep May Safely Graze, by
Bach; Variations for Carillon on a
Chime Tune by Sibelius, written by
Professor Price, and six sacred melo-
dies.

READ
and
USE
Daily
Classifieds

ANTHONY STEEL
DINAH SHERIDAN
HAROLD WARRENDER
ADrDED
"TH E EMBERS"
"LET'S GO" CARTOON
LATEST WORLD NEWS

I

I

Time of Cla
Meeting
8:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
1:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.

ss
Time of Examination
4:00 p.m., Thursday, July 31
7:00 p.m., Thursday, July 31
4:00 p.m., Friday, August 1
7:00 p.m., Friday, August 1
2:00 p.m., Friday, August 1
2:00 p.m., Thursday, July 31
To be arranged

MICHIGAN'S
ULTRA MODERN
SHOP
AIR CONDITIONED
6 Barbers
Special Attention Given
Ladies' & Children's Hair Cutting
U of H BARBERS
715 N. University
T.V. For Your Enjoyment

r

. .

EDGE WATER PARK
BALLROOM
Presents
JIMMY ' DORSEY
and His Orchestra
FRI., SAT. & SUN. NIGHTS, AUGUST 8, 9, 10
Located on Seven Mile Road
1 Block East of Telegraph, DETROIT
~~----~~--------------
SPECIAL TO ANN ARBOR
STUDENTS ONLY

!m

pmrwvm

"""

TRY OUR.
DELUXE SHIRT S ERVICE
" SHIRTS WASHED SPARKLING CLEAN
" IRONED TO PERFECTION
PACKAGED IN OUR FAMOUS
SHIRT PAX FOR COMPLETE
PROTECTION UNTIL READY

Ginrejn,.S L quil
FINAL SUMMER PROGRAM
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
DOORS OPEN 5:45 P.M.
CONTINUOUS SHOWINGS FROM
- 6:00 P.M.
FEATURE SHOWN 3 TIMES NIGHTLY
.SECOND SHOW 7:20 -- LAST SHOW 9:30
(See Time Schedule Below)
ALFRED H ITCHCOCK'S
MASTERPIECE OF SUSPENSE
A GAUMONT-BRITISH PICTURE
MICHAEL MARGARET PAUL DAME MAY
REDGRAVE LOCKWOOD LUKAS . WHITTY
"BRILLIANT comedy ... BRILLIANT melodrama . .. when your sides
are not aching from laughter, your brain is throbbing in its attempts
to outguess the director . . . we cannot conceal our admiration."
-N.Y. Times
ALSO
PARE LORENTZ'S
POETIC STUDY OF THE MISSISSIPPI
"THE RIVER"
A MASTERPIECE OF THE AMERICAN SCREEN
MUSIC BY VIRGIL THOMPSON

Playing Through Friday

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