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July 12, 1951 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-07-12

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THEMXtHIGANDAILY

JULY 12, 1951

i,

ON THE SPOT

By GEORGE FLINT
Daily Sports Editor

.. . .

THE *BUSTLE, the heat, the occasional laughter were present.
And you might have closed your eyes and said that it was
agay occasion.
BUT IT WASN'T REAL-the 50th birthday party which the
Detroit Times threw the home town Tigers Monday night.
All because fate had picked that morning to deprive the
baseball world of one of its finest figures-Harry Heilmann, the
great Detroit outfielder. Heilmann died of cancer of the lung
at the age of 56, in the midst of a career in baseball broadcasting
which had endeared him to thousands who had never seen
him play.
Warren Brown, Chicago Herald-American sportswriter who acted
as toastmaster for the party. at the Masonic Temple in Detroit, tried
to sound a happier note for the occasion. After asking the some 1500
fans and baseball celebrities to observe a moment of silence in
Heilmann's memory, he urged that the party go on as if nothing
had happened.
"Harry would want it that way," he said. "I knew him for a
longer time than anyone here, I think. We grew up together in San
Francisco. And the greatest tribute we can pay him is to be as happy
as he would be if he were here."
T SOUNDED a little like the clown's famous aria in Pagliacci--
and the assemblage seemed to force its laughter much as the
pitiable cuckold did.
These were moments when the banquet took on a lighter aspect.
Like the applause of Cleveland general manager Hank Greenberg
when White Sox stir Orestes Minoso was introduced. Greenberg, it
will be remembered, traded the versatile Cuban at the season's be-
ginning with the classic remark: "We can't find any place to use
him." Now Minoso is hotter than the late Jean Harlow's smile.
* * * *
GREENBERG'S clapping continued long after the rest of the
crowd had returned to their peas and banquet chicken (the usual
waxen variety)-and attracted the attention of all. Apparently the
former Tiger strong boy knows when he has made a mistake.
And there was a thrill of major proportions when the greatest
player to wear a baseball uniform stood up and talked for a few
informal moments. He was the same Tyrus Raymond Cobb that
terrorized the American League for 22 brilliant seasons-a little
portly now, with whitening hair and a walk which is no longer
cocky and imposing. But he spoke well and clearly, and told of
his great joy to be back in the town which he considers his
real home.
One speaker who was probably more at home on a stump than
any of the others present' gave what he termed his "valedictory"
speech as baseball commissioner. He was A: B. (Happy) Chandler,
and he could not resist a few digs at the clique among the owners
which had forced him out of office.
"This is the first time, to my knowledge, where a man needed more
than a majority to stay in office. It's sort of funny- having the sup-
port of all of the players and most of the managers, and even having
a majority of owners on my side, and still I'm out of a job. Why no
president of the United States has had anything like a 2/3 majority,
except George Washington."
BUT HAPPY turned away from that slightly sour subject and got in
some telling inferences to his beloved Southlands, where a "mess
of turnip greens and some side pork" were awaiting him when he left
the commissioner's job in a couple of weeks.
The Tigers honored their all-time team at the banquet, and other
than Heilmann only Mickey Cochrane, the catcher, was absent.
........--_ - ,------ *

I-M ACTION:
Cy's Boys
Nip Royals
By 2211
Intramural softball continued at
a brisk pace yesterday as the fa-
vorites in two leagues continued
their winning ways.
Cy's Boys, the power-laden out-
fit captained by assistant football
coach George Ceithaml, won a
weird ball game from the Royals,
12-11 in seven innings. The score
was as jumpy as the Ann Arbor
thermometer, as both clubs took
the lead three times, only to wind
up in an 11-11 tie at the end of
the regulation six innings.
* * *
UNBEATEN IN their league Cy's
Boys squeezed out the victory with
a run in the seventh.
Another unbeaten ball club,
the Public Health nine, slipped
by Pharmacy, 3-2, although
George Wikel of the latter
squadblasted a two-run home
run in the first inning to give
the league-leaders an anxious
moment.
Publi Health came back to tie
the score and push over the win-
ning marker in a contest which
took only 35 minutes to play,
which must be something of a
record for a six-inning game.
SIG EPS continued their come-
back with a victory over Alpha
Phi Alpha. They had beaten Phi
Gamma Delta Tuesday and may
be a team to watch in the frater-
nity league.
Phi Delta Phi made like a
basketball team in defeating Phi
Sigma Kappa, 32-12. Such scores
are no uncommon occurrence in
the summer leagues, since the
calibre of play is a matter of
getting nine men down to the
field in many cases.
The Air Force, whose opponents
had been doing the wild blue yon-
der stuff in past games, finally
came through for their first win,
a 15-12 conquest of Michigan
House.
Action in the volleyball and
basketball leagues will continue
next week, several strong aggre-
gations having signed up for com-
petition.
* * * .
Softball scores:
Public Health 3, Pharmacy 2.
Sigma Phi Epsilon 10, Alpha
Phi Alpha 3.
Hard Rocks 8, Phi Gamma
Delta 0.
Zoology 15, Education 12.
Air Force 11, Michigan House
7.
Chemistry 5, Lawyers 4.
Cy's Boys 12, Royals 11.
Phi Delta Phi 32, Phi Sigma
Kappa 12.

Majors Return
To Action Today
AL Scramble Strikes Fever Pitch
As Top Teams Play Key Contests

NEW YORK-(W)-Although the
National League slugged out a
victory in the 1951 major league
all-star gam, the American will
bounce right back into the spot-
light today when the pennant
races are resumed after a three-
day intermission.
The four clubs involved in a
knockdown battle for the lead in
the younger circuit start right off
by battling one another.
THE BOSTON RED SOX, hot-
test team in either league for the
past couple of weeks, go into Chi-
cago for a twi-night doublehead-
er opening a four-game series
with the league-leading White
Sox. At the same time the cham-
pion Yankees, who have slipped
to third, open a four-game set in
Cleveland with a night game
against the fourth-place Indians.
Since Cleveland is only four
games behind Chicago and two
behind the Yanks,, it's a situa-
tion which could put almost any
club on top at the windup.
In the National League, the
Brooklyn Dodgers, breezing along
with an 8/2 game lead over the
New York Giants, open a long
home stand against the western
clubs with a night game against
the seventh-place Chicago Cubs
while the Giants and Cardinals
fight it out for second place.
* * *
THE YANKEES, who beat the
Indians eight times in eleven at-
tempts during the first half of
the season, open a 13-game west-
ern tour with "the big fellow,"
Today's Games
NATIONAL LEAGUE
St. Louis at New York-Presko-
(6-3) or Chambers (6-8) vs. Koslo
(3-5).
Cincinnati at Boston (Night) -
Ramsdell (6-9) vs. Surkont (7-6).
Chicago at Brooklyn (Night)-Min-
ner (4-7) vs. Branca (7-2).
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (Night)
-Pollett (2-5) or Dickson (10-8) vs.
Church (9-4).
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Boston at Chicago (Twi-night Dou-
bleheader) Parnell (10-5) and Kily
(1-0) vs. Rogovin (5-4) and Dobson
(6-3).
New York atsCleveland (Night)--
Reynolds (9-5) vs. Feller (12-2).
Washington at Detroit - Johnson
(4-4) or Porterfield (1-3,) vs. Cain
(7-6).
Philadelphia at St. Louis (Twi-night
Doubleheader)-- Kellner (5-6) and
Shantz (7-6) vs. Widmar (3-7) and
Starr (1-4).

Joe DiMaggio, on the bench and
with a rather wobbly pitching
staff.
DiMaggio, suffering from a
torn leg muscle, was unable to
play in the All-Star game. He
is expected to be out of action
for at least ten days and may
not play at all in the west.
Meanwhile Manager C a s e y
Stengel is reported pulling strings
in an effort to bring up outfielder
Bob Cerv and southpaw pitcher
Jerry Wiesler from Kansas City as
insurance.
Stengel listed Allie Reynolds to
pitch tomorrow night's opener in
Cleveland against triple-no-hit
Bob Feller.
Although history has shown
that a big mid-season lead isn't
safe in Brooklyn, the Dodgers ap-
pear to be in no immediate danger.
hey have won seven of eleven
from the Cubs so far.
Return Shot
For Robinson
Set forNYC
NEW YORK-P)-Barring up-
sets and accidents, New York will
get the two fistic plums of the
year-the return title bouts be-
tween Randy Turpin and Ray
Robinson and Ezzard Charles and
Joe Louis.
Promoter Jim Norris of the In-
ternAtional Boxing Club made this
clear yesterday as he started
working on plans to stage both of
these shows in the Polo Grounds
in September.
If all goes according to plan, the
Turpin - Robinson middleweight
title bout will be held Sept. 6 and
the Charles - Louis heavyweight
championship bout Sept. 26.
Louis and Charles both have
some action scheduled before their
date. The Brown Bomber meets
Cesar Brion in San Francisco,
Aug. 1, and Charles is slated to
defend his crown' once more
against old Jersey Joe Walcott in
Pittsburgh, July 18.
In London, Robinson, who lost
the title to the 23-year old Turpin
in an astounding upset last night
in London, required ten stitches to
patch up a deep gash over his left
eye.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
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Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
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LOST AND FOUND
LOST WALLET - Will party finding
man's wallet in Harris Hall July 2
please mail the remains to Alexander
Smith, 1106 Packard. No questions
asked. The papers are vital. )101L
FOR SALE
2000 RECORDS (78 rpm), little used, at
25c per disc (no acoustics). Many
rare and imported items, Glynde-
bourne Mozart, Haydn Quartet Soc.,
Schweitzer's & Landowska's Bach,
Rubinstein's & Cartat's Chopin;
Bruckner, Mahier. All genres, media,
and periods. Also a few LP's at % off.
2-9185. )152
ATT. BUS AD STUDENTS-Executives
read Fortune at $12 a year. If you
read it at $7.50 a year, you may be-
come an executive. Phone your order
to Student Periodical Agency, 2-8242.
)154
MEN'S RAYON DRESS TROUSERS 3.88.
Free cuff alterations; assorted colors.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )151
WOMEN'S GOLF CLUBS-Matched set
4 irons, 1 wood. Brand new, never been
used. $24.95! Ph. 2-8692. )153
FOR RENT
MARRIED COUPLE-Room with break-
fast and lunch, kitchen privileges, $6
a week. 509 Walnut. Call 3-0807. )39F
MEALS 50e up
Breakfast...7:00-10:00
Lunch. ... .11:00-1 :30
Dinner . .,.. 5:00-7:00 V
MEAL MART
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ROOMS FOR RENT

SHARE APARTMENT with Grad Stu-
dent. Save on meals. $8 week. Big
yard, continuous hot water. Call
31791. )80R
CAMPUS Tourist Home. Rooms by Day
or Week. Bath, Shower, Television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )1R
GIRLS ROOMING HOUSE
Large studio type room. Two closets.
Two beds. Community kitchen. Be-
tween campus & hospitals. Ph. 2-2826.
81R

WANTED TO BUY

3-SPEED RALIEGH BICYCLE. Reason-
able. Call Al Raygor, 3-8506. )16X
WANTED TO RENT
STUDENT TENANTS-Moving out in
Aug.? Let us know if you have a 3-4
room apt. Call Jane, U. Ext. 2494, or
3-4459 after 5:00 p.m. )17W
HOUSE OR LIVING QUARTERS needed
by university instructor and family to
sublet until Aug. 20. References. Phone
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Read Daily Classifieds

r -

Have your
SHIRTS
Quick Laund
on our
NEW SHIRT PRESS
48-hour Regular Service
24-hour Rush Service
510 East William Phone

I I

Ends Tonight
EDGE OF DOOM
DANA ANDREWS
FARLEY GRANGER
and
Kill The Umpire
WILLIAM BENDIX
- Friday and Saturday -
Hold That Ghost
Abbott & Costello
I Killed eronomo
1 Hour of Cartoons

HeIlmlanw Rites
ScheduledToday
DETROIT-(P)-Everyone from
a ballpark peanut vendor to Will
Harridge, President of the Amer-
ican League, filed past the bier of
Harry Heilmann yesterday.
The former Detroit Tiger base-
ball star and broadcaster, beloved
by thousands of Michigan fans,
will be buried at 10 a.m. today
from the Shrine of the Little
Flower in suburban Royal Oak.
A steady stream of persons of
all races visited the chapel where
Heilmann, who died Monday, lay.
Heilmann died of lung cancer.
His wife, Mae, asked that flowers
be ommitted and funds given to
the fight against cancer. The cha-
pel was still filled with flowers.

By CHARLES DUNKLEY
CHICAGO-(AP)-The big ques-
tion is no longer: "What's holding
the Chicago White Sox up," but
"can they keep going?"
That question will be partly an-
swered today when Boston's fear-
some Red Sox, trailing the pace-
setting White Sox by a mere game,
open, a four-game series here at
Comiskey Park. Today's twi-light-
night double header will be fol-
lowed by a night game tomorrow
and a single skirmish Saturday
afternoon.
Manager Paul Richards is pre-
pared for the third and probably
most crucial visit of the Boston
artillerymen. Lean Paul has se-
lected pitchers Joe Dobson, with a
record of six victories against two
defeats, and Saul Rogovin, 5-4, for
today's brawling and Lefty Billy
Pierce primed for a pitching ef-
fort tomorrow night.
DOBSON AND Rogovin have
been successful in their only starts

I

Oneto' n
COUNTRY I N N
We are now serving
luncheons from 11 A.M.
From 60 Cents
RENTON'S COUNTRY INN
Next to Drive Inn Theater
on Washtenaw Road

RED SOX THE VILLAINS?
Chisox Face Make-or-Break Series

against Boston this season. Dob-
son conquered his former team-
mates, 9-5, last May 16 and Rogo-
vin shutout the Bostonians, 2-0, in
a night game here June 4.
There is at least one com-
forting thought relative to the
Boston invasion. Traditionally,
the Bostonians are lambs for the
slaughter when they are parted
from their home base in Fenway
Park. To support the theory
that they can be brought down
to size is the record of the won-
der-working White Sox against
them in the current American
League race. The unpredictable
Sox have beaten them seven
times in 11 games both here and
in Boston and they have won
four out of five in Comiskey
Park.
These are not, however, the Red
Sox who were stumbling along a
month ago. They took the World's
Champion, N e w York Yankees
apart at Fenway Park last week
and didn't bother about putting
them back together again. They
swept a three game series, scoring
22 runs to nine for the Yanks.

BUT NEITHER are these White
Sox the same as yesteryear when
they were fumbling in the Ameri-
can League cellar. As the White
Sox start the secohd half of the
season, they have a 49-29 record
for their first 78 games. Boston
has played only 76 games and still
has 29 losses. The New York
Yankees also have dropped 29
games, although the third place
Yankees have played 74.
The fast and furious style of
the White Sox play is bound up
in comparative youngsters, short-
stop Chico Carrasquel, s e c o n d
baseman Nelson Fox and outfield-
ers Jim Busby and Orestes Minoso.
Not to be discounted is the reserve
strength. The team that wins
must have a solid line of substi-
tutes who keep the first stringers
on their toes and are ready to fill
any breach in the defense.
Without exception, the White
Sox have three men for every po-
sition. Their only deficit is the
lack of a really outstanding pitch-
er, but thefr amazing defense
compensates in a measure for that
deficiency.

to take home.. .
ROYAL DESIGN
DOG FIGURINES
$150 to $700
Genuine Oscar Mortens' Dog
Figurines to thrill both the giver
and receiver of these life-like
Mortens' Models.
Souvenirs of
University of Michigan
Mugs & Glasses
Novelty Ashtrays
Unusual
SALT & PEPPER
SHAKERS
Largest Assortment in
Town
OFFICE
EQUIPMENT
COMPANY
"Your Roal Typeriter Dealer"
215 E. Liberty Ph. 2-1213

SUMMER
SLACKS
25% OFF

I

SAVE

I

SAVE !

SPORT CAPS
ALL TYPES
20% OFF

S
O
X
10%
Off

SWIM
TRUNKS
20% OFF

T-SHIRTS and SPORT SHIRTS
Reduced to 20% & 50%

I

44c until 6:30

v

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY

I CONTINUOUS
-- ----DAILY FROM 1 P.M.
NOW PLAYING
THE LIR ST'R I

44c
to
6:30
P.M.

The Department of Speech presents
Arthur Miller's adaptation of
"An Enemy of the People"
by HENRIK IBSEN
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday - 8 P.M.
Admission $1.20-90c-60c (tax inc.)
Box Office Open 10 A.M.-8 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

Come in and Look Around
SIcE's MEN'S SHOP
1107 South University - opposite Bank

_____ _

VioAVl
VH r MIN A. . W R"nMf Rom

e

-Um

ENJOY TEN
use
Wright-Dits

INIS
son

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