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July 08, 1951 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-07-08

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SUNDAY, JULY 8, 1951

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Yi

LOOK and LISTEN

MILLER ADAPTATION:
Ibsen Tragedy Will Open Wednesday

Radio
By MARILYN FLORIDIS

(.>

TV

A new weekly series of programs
from 9:15 to 9:30 a.m. Sundays,
called "Words Men Live By" will1
start the radio schedule for NBCl
this week.
The program, narrated by Mel1
Brandt, will bring to radio listen-
ers the words by which men of all
ages, religions, and creeds have,
lived.
ENGLAND'S FORMER Prime
Minister's daughter, Sarah Chur-l
chill, will be starred on "New The-i
atre" which will be heard at 7:30s
p.m. today. ,
Nathan Milstein, celebrated
violinist, will be guest soloist onI
tre "NBC Symphony Orchestra
Summer Concert Series" with,
Maurice Abravanel as guest con--t
ductor at 8:30 p.m.
A discussion of "What Have the'
MacArthur Hearings Proved" by
Senators John J. Sparkman (D.,
Ala.), Robert S. Kerr (D., Okla.),
Harry P. Cain (R., Wash.), and
William F. Knowland (R., Calif.),
will be heard on the NBC program,
"American Forum of the Air" at
10:30 p.m.
CO-STARRING IN an original
musical play, "Casey at the Bat,"
Gordon MacRae, baritone, and
Dorothy Warenskjold, soprano,
will sing and act out the story
behind Casey's famous strikeout.
The show will be heard at 8:00
pm. tomorrow.
CBS will present "Summer in,
St. Louis," featuring excerpts from
Johann Strauss' "Die Fleder-
maus," broadcast from the stage
of the Municipal Opera at 3:30
p.m. today.
The.University speech depart-
ment will also be providing lis-
teners with entertainment over
WUOM and WHRV.
Highlighting their productions
will be the "Angell Hall Play-
house," heard Tuesdays over WU-
OM and directed by Prof. Garnet
Garrison. The object of this play-
house is to experiment with vari-
ous types of writings. Their pro-
gram for Tuesday will be an origi-
nal science fiction story, written
by a University graduate Max
Kelly and called "Fog."
A MONDAY through Friday
presentation will be the "News
Program" heard at noon with stu-
dents commenting on world af-
fairs over WHRV.
Heard on WUOM at 5:30 p.m.
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
will be "Down Story Book Lane."
This is a student written, cast, and
lirected production.
Transcribed from the Univer.
sity studios, the "Dramatic Chil-
dren's Story" will be heard at 8:45;
a.m. over WWJ. This is another
"Down Story Book Lane" produc-
tion.

By MIKE BOOM
Last year if you asked a tele-
vision viewer to name a few signs
that told him summer was here,
he would probably have answered
with "Movies . .. old movies .. .
more old movies."
Well, the television industry has
not yet found a way to do away
entirely with Hollywood's epics of
the 1930's that formerly replaced
all the major TV shows for the
summer. However, viewers will be
pleased to know that an increas-
ing number of "live" productions
are serving as replacements this
year.
AMONG THE best of this sum-
mer's crop of new shows is the
"Westinghouse Summer Theatre,"
seen on Channel 2 at 9 p.m. Mon-
day. It replaces "Studio One."
probably TV's most consistently'
excellent dramatic presentation,
and does a very creditable job.
Comedies, mysteries, and
lighter works will be featured,
and there are promised several
repeats of past "Studio One"
successes. Next week, John Mc-
Quade (TV and radio's "Charlie
Wild") and Margaret Hayes will
star in a mystery, "Nightfall."
NBC has kept in the lighter vein
in providing a relief show for
"Kukla, Fran, and Ollie," seen
on Channel 4 at 6 p.m., Monday
through Friday.aThey now offer a
new personality, Ernie Kovacs, in
a show that is hardly describable.
Ernie himself says it's "a short
show . . . it just seems long."
On some nights Ernie deals in
his forte, subtle satire, but on
others he explodes with boister-
ous corn. All in all, this mixture
of comedy, songs, and music is
fine fare for summer dinnertime
viewing.
* *
FRED WARING'S summer suc-
cessor is a production called
"Guest House," viewed on Chan-
nel 2 at 8 p.m., Sunday.
Although the studio was filled
with over a dozen top enter-
tainers and theatrical personali-
ties for the premier show last
week, Oscar Levant had little
trouble stealing the spotlight.

By HARRIET TEPPERMAN
Second in the speech depart-
ment's summer series of plays,
"An Enemy of the People," adapt-
ed by Arthur Miller, '38, will be
presented on campus for the first
time at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Henrik Ibsen's long-famous tra-
gedy - of which Miller's is the
most recently produced adapta-
tion-tells of the unsanitary con-
ditions of the health baths which
have become the livelihood of a
small town in Norway, and how
they affect two publicly prominent
brothers.
'. * *
ONE BROTHER, a doctor, dis-
Depart ments
To Present
Symposiums
A scientific "growth and differ-
entiation" symposium will be held
Monday through Thursday in the
School of Public Health.
"The Longer Classic: Fiction"
will be considered at a conference
of English teachers at 4 p.m. to-
morrow in Rackham Assembly
Hall.
Dean James B. Edmonson of the
School of Education will lecture on
"The Old Versus the New in Edu-
cation" at 4 p.m. tomorrow in
Scherling Auditorium.
Prof. William G. Moulton of Cor-
nell University will give the first
of three linguistics program lec-
tures at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Rackham Amphitheater.

covers and becomes scientifically
certain of the water's pollution.
He mistakenly believes that he has
done the town a great service and
that the matter will be improved
immediately.
But Dr. Stockmann, played by
Nafe Katter, Grad., had not coun-
ted on his brother-mayor of the
town-who's reaction was entire-
ly different.
Peter Stockmann, played by
Richard Burgwin, Grad., and
Bruce Nary, Grad., who plays
Hovstad, the local newspaper
editor, succeed in turning the
whole town against the doctor.
Attempting to defend his posi-
tion, which is one of truth, Dr.
Stockmann holds a meeting in a
private home,-the only place not
controlled by Havstad and the
mayor.
EVEN THERE, however, the
side of hypocrisy is able to move
the mob's spirit. They attack the
home; Dr. Stockmann; his wife
as played by Bernice Daniel,
Grad.; and his children, played
by Dennis Morley and Michael
Philbin, two Ann Arbor grammar
school students.
At this point, branded as an
enemy of the people, Dr. Stock-
mann martyrs himself and his
Seville Holy Week
"The Holy Week in Seville" will
be the title of an informal discus-
sion to be presented by Richard
Defendini, a member of the ro-
mance language department, at
the Sociedad Hispanica meeting at
8 p.m. Tuesday in the East Con-
erence Room of the Rackham
Building.

family. He cancels their plan-
ned journey to America, and
tells them that because they
stand for truth they must re-
concile themselves to eternal
loneliness,
Others in the cast include Wil-
liam Taylor, Gloria Moore, Wil-
lard Booth, Stan Challis and
James Briley, all of whom are
graduate students in the speech
department.
* * *
ORIGINALLY TH idea came
to Ibsen when he read an article
in a German newspaper about a
similar event. The play contains
a good deal of autobiography in
that Ibsen himself was being cri-
ticized for standing by absolute
objective truth without the com-,
promises demanded by society's
practicality.
Miller has adapted the some-
what stilted language of the lit-
eral translation into free-flow-
ing American colloquialisms
without changing Ibsen's moral
point of view.
Directed by Prof. H. Z. Norton,
sets for the play have been de-
signed by George Crepeau, and
the costumes executed by Lucy
Barton.
Tickets for the performances,
which will be held Wednesday
through Saturday night, may be
purchased from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
daily, and on performance night
until 8 p.m., at the Lydia Men-
delssohn box office.

'I

TOP DOG HOSTELRY-Washtenaw County's new model humane society shelter has been in opera-
tion for less than a month and the present guests report that they like the $100,000 layout just fine.
0 ~ ** * *

o gs LifeNotSolBad
At Model Animal Shelter

By CAL PATTERSON
Leading a dog's life, or any oth-
er kind of life, at the new Wash-
tenaw County Humane Society
animal shelter can be pretty sat-
isfactory.
The present guests at the
month-old $100,000 model shelter
just south of Dixboro chorused
agreement to a reporter that the
facilities are the cat's meow.
* * *
A STEADY turnover of ten-
nants has reduced the original
booking of 47-including two
ducks, a raccoon and a deodorized
skunk-to a group comprised of,
four cats, 14 kittens and a host of
dogs, .but the four-legged residents
are obviously still pretty happy
about their quarters.
And with good reason, too.
The effoorts of Herbert Gay,
shelter manager, to make them
comfortable, are facilitated by
Peace Arts
To Be Shown

A "Festival of the Arts for'
As MC of a visual wInformation ihhedat4m

Please" dealing with show busi-
ness topics, Levant mugged, pun-
ned, and insulted his way through
the hour. His brash style is some-
thing fresh on TV, but after 45
minutes even it became somewhat
annoying. With some toning down,
this show can become highly en-
tertaining.
Some of the top shows are stay-
ing on for the summer, among
them Ed Sullivan's "Toast of the
Town" (Channel 2, 7 p.m., Sun-
day), "What's My Line" (Channel
2, 9:30 p.m., Sunday), "Your Hit
Parade" (Channel 4, 9:30 p.m.,
Saturday), and "Twenty Ques-
tions" (Channel 2, 7 p.m., Friday).

reace wil J 11 L pJ. . A71.,
July 15, under the sponsorship of
the Ann Arbor Council of Arts,
Sciences, and Professions, accord-
ing to Betty Engield, Grad., social
secretary of the organization.
The festival will be held in the
garden of the residence at 523
Packard St. It will feature an
exhibition of paintings from the
recent " Chicago Peace Congress,
and a musical program.
Dinner will be served from 5 to
7 p.m. Persons desiring dinner
reservations should telephone 3-
1358 or 3-0425 as soon as possible.
Persons wishing to exhibit works
of art are invited to telephone Miss
Enfield at 3-0425.

such up-to-date aids as radiant
heat, modern ventilation equip-
ment, germicidal lamps, a diet
kitchen and continual running
water in all kennels.
There are also observation
and isolation wards for ailing
animals, enameled bathtubs and
a special nursery for the young.
A 28-cage "adoption room" gives
each pet an equal chance to
land a new master.
Hopelessly injured or diseared
animals are dispatched by a mo-
dern gas chamber which puts sub-
jects to sleep in less than a min-
ute's. time.
THE DELUXE layout includes
the shelter proper, a residence for
the manager and a garage with an
adjacent barn for wayward horses
or cows.
Funds for construction of the
shelter were donated by Frederick
C. Matthaei, Detroit industrialist.
"We spent a year and a half in
research," Matthaei said, "I think
we are far ahead of any other lo-
cality."
Chances are, the present in-
habitants of the shelter think so
too.
Alimony Hitched
To Cost of Living
DETROIT- VP) -Alimony, too,
has been hitched to the cost of
living.
It seems that of the nearly 1,900'
revisions of Circuit Court orders
in divorce cases last year, a large
majority were to help keep di-
vorcees abreast of their ex-hub-
bles' inflation - fattened p a y
checks.
Edward Pokorny, friend of the
court, hastened to explain that di-
vorcees usually don't rely on any
government price index. But he
pointed out that they have a right
to petition for more alimony if
there is a "material change" in
their former husbands' income.
Stassen Hits Post
For Youngdahl
ST. PAUL, Minn.-(P)-Harold
E. Stassen yesterday blasted ap-
pointment of Gov. Luther W.
Youngdahl of Minnesota to the
Federal District Bench as a "typi-
cal Truman trick of clever poli-
tics."
Stassen, former Minnesota Gov-
ernor himself, said he feels re-
moval of Youngdahl from Minne-
sota is a "brazen attempt to grab
the governorship of Minnesota in
1952 from Sen. Hubert Humphrey
or one of his henchmen."

mide Range
Of Exhibits
Featured
Exhibits ranging from the lowly
to the sublime - swimmer's itch
to the seventh. President of the
University-are now on display
at various museums and libraries
around the campus.
Students planning swimming
parties at lakes near Ann Arbor
would do well to note the display
in the Museums Building which
illustrates the process by which
parasitic larvae, living in the blood
of water birds, attach themselves
to humans and cause a painful
skin condition, known as swim-
mer's itch. Methods of prevention
and control of swimmer's itch are
also shown.
AN EXHIBIT on the first floor
of the General Library pays tri-
bute 'to Alexander G. Ruthven,
seventh president of the Univer-
sity, by showing how the campus
has grown under his guidance
from 1930 to 1950.
Several volumes from Presi-
dent Ruthven's rare book col-
lection are in the library cases.
After seeing the work of ex-
pansion done by the seventh presi-
dent of the University, students
may be interested in a display
showing the University a it first
existed in Detroit in 1817.
Pictures of the lone building in
which the University washhoused
and of its first president, the Rev-
erend John Monteith, are now on
exhibit in the Michigan Histori-
cal Collection Room of the Rack-
ham Building.
* * *
IN CONNECTION with the pro-
posal to make Hawaii the 49th
state, copies of the Hawaiian con-
stitution, which was modeled ater
the constitution of the United
States, can be seen in cases in the
basement of the Law Library. Also
on display in this library are laws
of the Indian nations.
Upstairs in the Law Library the
history of printing in the United
States is traced, by showing a col-
lection of rare first editions.
An ancient version of a pawn-
broker's shop can be seen in the
Museum of Archeology's display
"Life in a Roman town in Egypt."
Six rooms in the building are de-
voted to ancient Egyptian arti-
facts.
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BUSINESS SERVICES

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MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
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LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
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LOST AND FOUND
PARKER 51 PEN-Black and silver, gold
clip on Madison, State Angell Hall.
Reward. Ralph L. Christensen 2-9234.
)100L
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Record player automatic
change; mahogany lamp table. Phone
2-8696. )150
WOMEN'S GOLF CLUBS -- 4 matched
irons, 1 wood. Brand new. Never been
used. $24.95. Ph. 2-8692. )145
FOR RENT
MODERN APARTMENT on Half Moon
Lake. Boat and utilities furnished.
July through September. Chelsea 7607.
)38F
APARTMENT-Complete kitchen, utili-
ties provided. Men preferred, near
campus. Call between 5-7 p.m., 6336.
906 Greenwood. )37F

ROOMS FOR RENT

WASHTENAW AREA - Pleasant single
room with private lavatory and toilet.
Gentlemen preferred. 2-3868. )77R
SHARE APARTMENT with Grad Stu-
dent. Save on meals. $8 week. Big
yard, continuous hot water. Call
31791. )80R
CAMPUS Tourist Home. Rooms by Day
or Week. Bath, Shower, Television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )1R
GIRLS ROOMING HOUSE
Large studio type room. Two closets.
Two beds. Community kitchen. Be-
tween campus & hospitals. Ph. 2-2826.
)81R
MISCELLANEOUS
AT LIBERTY--German 11 and 12 In-
structor does tutoring and translation.
A. R. Neumann, 2-7909. )14M
ROOM AND BOARD
FOOD FOOD FOOD - Home cooked
meals for men. Excellent food and
coffee. 1319 Hill. )4X
BOARD AT FRATERNITY HOUSE -
Short block from Law Quad, corner
Hill and Oakland. Eating schedule at
your convenience. Really good food.
Ph. 2-1634. )3X
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING WANTED to do in my home.
Experienced. Ph. 7590, 830 8. Main.
)32B
MEALS 50e up
Breakfast...7:.00-1:.00
Luc.-."..10-1:3
Dinner ..... 5:00-7:00 c
o 0
MEAL MART
CAFETERIA0
338 Maynard, Thru the Arcade
~l.Om O t O U

THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
does not advertise its special rates to-
day because it is closed on Sundays.
Phone 2-8242 tomorrow.
TYPING -- Reasonable rates, accurate
work. Phone 3-4040. )35B
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry .and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. We ape-
cialize in doing summer dresses.

4

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Doors Open
12:45 P.M.
Continuous
Daily from 1 P.M.

Playing Through
Tuesday

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g' '
l f ,'Y _. '3
.:, .
r'
r, H ~ a
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Special Summer Policy
44c until 5 P.M.
Monday Through Friday

-Starts Today-
fighting
a
ever
Sfought
.?before...
defin7
sub,
foe
and
jungle.

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DAILY

The Department of Speech
presents

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Learn Advertising,
Finance, Layout,
Circulation
The Michigan Daily
Business Department will have a
meeting for those interested in
trying out for staff jobs.

i
r
El

Arthur Miller's adaptation of
"AN ENEMY OF
THE PEOPLE"
by Henrik Ibsen
Wednesday thru Saturday
July 11-14 at 8 P.M.

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