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July 08, 1951 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1951-07-08

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4

a

SUNDAY, JULY 8, 1951 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

Red

('Hot)

Sox Crush,

Yankees,

10- 4;

Tigers

Win

_L

.r.,

# *, *

r. { ON THE SPOT
r By GEORGE FLINT
Daily Sports Editor

*

*

*

*

*

*

Tigers, Cain
End Indian
Sign, 13-3

DIAMOND BIRTHDAY PARTY:

All-Star Tilt at Detroit Tuesday

BEHIND THE hot arg-ment surrounding the NCAA's ban on tele-
vision of football gars 'played by its member colleges is a blue-
bound folio pamphlet, which has brought the blessings of science to
that business-minded organization.
Penn, as has become increasingly clear, does not care too much for
the NCAA ruling. And so, in the true revolutionary spirit, it has voic-
ed the desire to televise its football games next fall and may the NCAA
forever hold its peace-which it won't.
* * * *
THERE IS A good argument for Pennsylvania's stand in the mat-
ter. But the aforementioned blue volume seems to bear out the opin-
ions of the NCAA.
The pamphlet in question is a carefully-documented report
written by the University of Chicago's National Opinion Research
Center. Chicago, having no intercollegiate football, was of course
the ideal place for such a study.
The report's conclusions are, in brief:
.1. College football attendance in 1950 dropped off for the first time
since the war. This decline was in part due to the increased number
of television receivers found in the American home.
2. Colleges in the television area showed a 4% decrease in at-
tendance, while colleges outside the area showed a 4% increase.
3. There is no foreseeable likelihood that attenda'nce losses will be
regained as television's novelty effect wears off.
4. Colleges whose own games were telecast in 1950 reported heavy
declines. But competition by other network programs and by other
telecast games seemed to have little effect on attendance.
* * * *
THESE CONCLUSIONS were arrived at through a careful screening
of statistics from every part of the nation. Variables such as rain,
poorly-matched teams, ticket prices, or overall :economic conditions
were taken into consideration and the results were carefully checked.
Michigan is one of the colleges most influential in the NCAA
ruling's passage. Athletic Director H. O. Crisler (now on a tour of
West Germany with Yale's Herman Hickman and others) was
the chairman of the TV committee and has been outspoken in the
camp of the 'view with alarm' contingent.
Whether or not Penn has a legal leg to stand on in the controversy
must await possible adjudication if a case comes up. But on the basis
of the facts, it seems that the NCAA is on firm ground about the
deleterious effects of video on college football attendance.
* * * * *
TWAS A reminder of the old days of baseball the other day when an
Intramural softball game was held up for 15 minutes while both
teams went in search of the ball. A line drive had gone high on the
hill which borders Ferry Field, and the tall grass there made it diffi-
cult to espy.
Reason it's like the old days (of which this writer, of course, was
not a witness): Seems that before ball parks evolved from the primi-
tive cow field into the modern stadium, outfield fences were a rare
phenomenon. So many times the tall grass which bordered the outer
gardens became the haven for a batted ball. Even the slowest runners
would make extra bases when a harried outfielder was forced to run
to and fro in search of the gum-smeared horsehide.
ONE OF THE old-time ballplayers-Buck Miller, I think it was-.
pulled one of the smarter tricks back in the nineties. When such
a ball was hit to his field, he could always find the pellet immediately.
Opposing teams caught on eventually. Miller had sown the tall grass
with baseballs, and had only to run to the nearest supply station when
the ball eluded his reach and rolled into the clover.
Speaking of Miller, some saw that he is indirectly responsivse
for the present great formality which surrounds substitution.
In the game's infancy, the managers could substitute by merely
yelling to the umpire and sending their man in.
Miller, coaching at first base one day, exercised his quick wit in a
way which somewhat exasperated the opposition. On a foul fly down
the line, Miller's catcher tripped and fell while in hot pursuit. Where-
upon Buck shouted "Miller for Smith!" caught the ball, and choked
off what had looked like a dangerous rally.

RED ROLFE
jinx ends

Hart Takes
Wimbledon
TennisTitle
WIMBLEDON, England - (P) -
Doris Hart of Miami, Fla., the girl
with the greatest collection of
strokes in women's tennis, won
the singles title and shared in two
doubles crowns as the All-England
Championships came to a close
yesterday.
She needed a scant 30 minutes
to crush her close friend, Shirley
Fry of Akron, Ohio, 6-1, 6-0, in
the singles final. After an hour
and a half's rest she took Shirley
on her side and outlasted the de-
fending champions, Louise Brough
and Mrs. Margaret Osborne Du-
pont, 6-3, 13-11, in a tremendous
doubles struggle.
AT DAY'S end she paired with
Frank Sedgman of Australia to
win the mixed doubles over Mer-
vyn Rose and Mr. Nancye Wynne
Bolton of Australia, 7-5, 6-2.
By winning the three titles,
Miss Hart duplicated the feat
of Miss Brough in 1948 and last
year.
Sedgman and Ken McGregor
successfully defended their men's
doubles title with a 3-6, 6-2, 6-3,
3-6, 6-3, victory over Jaroslav
Drobny of Egypt and Eric Sturgess
of South Africa.
(* * *
DICK SAVITT of Orange, N. J.,
won the men's singles champion-
ship Friday with a 6-4, 6-4, 6-4
victory over McGregor, the tall
Aussie Davis Cupper. Thus, Amer-
icans either won or shared in four
of the five titles decided in the
fortnight of play.
Doris, twice previously a de-
feated finalist of the famed cen-
ter court, was cheered on by the
capacity crowd of 15,000 as she
raced to her singles triumph.
She attacked Shirley's baseline
game-Miss Fry's strongest point-
and kept hammering away until
the Ohio girl cracked under the
strain.
A STROKE analysis of the
match showed just how well the
plan worked. Doris scored 52
points in the match. Twenty-nine
of them came on driving errors by
Shirley.
"I couldn't be happier," Doris
said after her singles victory.
"I've always wanted to win
Wimbledon more than any other
tournament."
Doris lost her two previous
Wimbledon finals to Miss Osborne,
now Mrs. Dupont, in 1947, and to
Miss. Brough in 1948. Both times
she started fast, only to fall behind
with the arrival of Queen Mother
Mary; a great tennis fan. Queen
Mary didn't come today.
"I guess I'm glad she didn't,"
Doris admitted. "I've always tried
not to be bothered, but I guess I
was.
Most of the excitement of the
afternoon was packed into the
second set of the women's dou-
bles, with the crowd divided be-
tween pulling for Doris to get her
second victory and cheering Miss
Brough's gallant play. Louise
played the entire tournament with
an ailing right elbow that might
have cost her her singles crown,
but she looked her former self yes-
terday.

Giants Top Braves
In 11th Frame, 13-3
By The Associated Press
BOSTON-()-The Boston Red
Sox, sparked by a first inning
grand slam home run by Clyde
Vollmer, yesterday lambasted the
New York Yankees 10-4 to hand
the World's Champions their sev-
enth straight defeat of the season
in Boston.
Ellis Kinder, in his first Boston
start of 1951 and kept 11 hits,
including three homers, fairly well
scattered while totaling 10 strike-
outs.
** *
THE WHITE-HOT Red Sox
batters, however, insured Kinder's
success in the first inning when
they blasted Allie Reynolds for six
runs, four on Vollmer's grand-
slam homer.
Ted Williams clouted Shea for
his 16th homer in the sixth with
Johnny Pesky aboard to boost
his top place RBI total to 76.
Dom DiMaggio also hit that New
York fireman for his eighth ho-
mer in the fourth.
An aroused bunch of Detroit
Tigers abandoned their role of
doormat for the Cleveland Indians
and slapped them down, 13 to 3.
THE TIGERS staged their big-
gest hitting spree of the season,
racking up 20 safeties as they ko'd
their old nemesis, Bob Lemon.
It snapped a streak of 11
straight losses to the Indians
this season.
Lefthander Bob Cain of the Ti-
gers enjoyed his afternoon thor-
oughly as he gained sweet revenge
against the club which had beaten
him by 2-1 scores on his last two
tries against them. He blanked:
them until the Tigers had built
up an 8-0 lead.
THE NEW YORK Giants scored
a thrilling 7-6 victory over the
Boston Braves in 11 innings before
11,307 fans, winning out when Ed
Stanky tripled and romped home
on Alvin Dark's fly ball.
Vernon Law spun a five-hit web
overthe St. Louis Cardinals yes-
terday to win his third victory of
the season 5-1 for the Pittsburgh
Pirates before a crowd of 10,127
pad in addition to 3,561 kids.
The Cincinnati Reds pounded
the offerings of four pitchers for
15 hits to defeat the Chicago Cubs,
8 to 6, before 11,626 fans. It was
the Cub's sixth straight defeat.
Gus Zernial slammed two home
runs, his 20th and 21st of the
year, to lead the Philadelphia Ath-
letics to a 4-3 victory over Wash-
ington. Morris Martin, who al-
lowed only one hit in 4 innings
after relieving Dick Fowler, post-
ed his fourth win.
The Brooklyn Dodgers exploded
for three runs in the seventh to
break a 2-2 tie and drive Robin
Roberts from the mound to de-
feat the Philadelphia Phillies, 6 to
2 before 30,695 fans.
TheChicago White Sox took a
half-game lead in the tight Amer-
ican League pennant race by
downing the St. Louis Browns 5-3
after Chico Carrasquel sent them
off to a lead with a three-run
homer in the second.
Saul Rogovin got off to shaky
start, yielding two runs on three
straight singles in the first, but
settled down to go the distance
for his fifth triumph against four
defeats. He struck out four.

GIL HODGES VIC WERTZ ,
... a new Bambino? .. . supplies punch

Ii

Major League Standings

I

Nearby Detroit missed a World
Series last fall by the breadth of
a slightly fat whisker, but the Mo-
tor City has an event coming up
on Tuesday which many fans pre-
fer to the autumn classic.
It's the annual All-Star baseball
game, and will help to celebrate
Detroit's 250th birthday in grand
style.
THE NATIONAL League, hun-
gry for more victories, appears to
have one of its strongest teams.
The senior circuit boasts of a cou-
ple sluggers, Stan Musial and Gil
Hodges, and a consistently fine
hitter, Jackie Robinson.
The National Leaguers also
have speed, with Robinson, Phi-
ladelphia's Richie Ashburn, and
Del Ennis calculated to give
trouble on the basepaths.
The American League attack
will again feature the big money
man, Ted Williams, who has a
habit of breaking up these con-
tests. Detroit's Vic Wertz will also
be a dangerous man for National
League pitchers.
Starting lineups for the game
(exclusive of pitchers), which will
begin at 1:30 p.m.:
AMERICAN NATIONAL
Fain, Phila.L.....IB Hodges, Brooklyn
Fox, Chicago ...2B Robinson, Bkyn.
Carrasquel, -Chi. SS.. Dark New York
Kell, Detroit ....3B.. Elliott, Boston
Williams, Boston LF Musial, St. Louis
DiMaggio, Bost'n CF.. Ashburn, Phil.
Wertz, Detroit ..RF.... Ennis, Phila.
Berry, New York C Campenella, Bkin.
Berra Out . .
BOSTON--(MP)-Yogi Berra, New
York Yankees catcher, probably
will be unable to play in the All-
Star game next week, his mana-
ger, Casey Stengel, said yesterday.
Out of the lineup with a back
injury, Berra is wearing a corset
and, according to Stengel, can't
bend without pain.
"It would be unfair," said Casey,
who is the American League team
manager in the All-Star contest,
"to the fans and to the League to
use him."

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Chicago ......
New York ....
Boston.......
Cleveland ....
Detroit ......
Washington
Philadelphia .
St. Louis ......

w 1. Pct. GB
48 29 .623 ..
45 28 .616 1
46 29 .613 1
42 32 .568 4'.
34 36 .486 10 j
29 44 .397 17
29 46 .387 18
22 51 .301 24

Brooklyn ...,
New York ..,
St. Louis .....
Cincinnati ...
Philadelphia
Boston.......
Chicago ......
Pittsburgh

w
49
43
39
36
35
33
30
30

L
26
35
34
38
40
40
39
43

Pet.
.635
.551
.534
.486
.467
.452
.435
.411

GB
7f4
9
121,4
14
15
16
18

JACKIE ROBINSON
.. for NL, flying spikes
DO YOU KNOW . . that
Princeton's Bob Brawner holds
the National Collegiate Athletic
Association record for the 200-
yard breaststroke, a 2:14.3 mark
posted in 1950.
. - R

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 13, Cleveland 3.
Boston 10, New York 4.
Philadelphia 4, Washington 3.
Chicago 5, St. Louis 3.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS

Brooklyn 5, Philadelphia 2.
Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 1.
New York 7, Boston 6 (11 innings).
Cincinnati 8, Chicago 6.

TODAY'S GAMES

* a* *
TODAY'S GAMES

Cleveland at Detroit - (2) - Wynn
(7-9) and Garcia (9-6) vs. Bearden
(2-1) and Newhouser (6-5) or Trout
(3-11).
Philadelphia at Washington-(2)--
Kellner (5-5) and Scheib (1-9) vs.
Hudson (2-5) and Marrero (7-5).
New York at Boston-Raschi (12-5)
vs. Scarborough (4-4).
Chicago at St. Louis-Pierce (8-6)
vs. Byrne (2-3).

STUDENT
SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
Repaired
".,,,Rented
Sold
Bought
Fountain Pens repaired by
a factory trained man.
Webster-Chicago Wirerecorders
MOR RIL L'S
314 S. State Ph. 7177

Boston at New York-Cole (0-2) vs.
Maglie (12-4).
Brooklyn at Philadelphia-Roe (12-
1) vs. Church (9-4).
St. Louis at Pittsburgh-(2)-Staley
(11-7) and Poholsky (4-6) vs. Werle
(5-1) and Friend (2-5).
Cincinnati at Chicago -(2) - Raf-
fensberger (8-9) and Ramsdell (6-9)
vs. Schultz (3-5) and Rush (5-4).

COTTON
SEPARflTES

.rte.
t
.,

Blouses...

" t0 $59

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Pennsylvania Wins
In HenleyRegatta
HENLEY ON THAMES, Eng-
land - OF) - The University of
Pennsylvania's smooth 150-pound
crew came from behind yesterday
with a tremendous surr in the
last 300 yards to defeat the heavy-
weight Florsheim - Russelsheim
eight of Germany by one length
and win the Royal Henley Re-
gatta's Thames challenge cup.
It was the first time in five
races on the Thames that the
Quaker shell had trailed and they
rallied like champions to win the
cup left undefended by the Kent
school of Connecticut.

Baseball's
BigSix
By The Associated Press
Leading Batsgen (Based on 200 or
more at bats)

1o PRINTS
r PLAIDS

i." Sleeveless
joo Cap Sleeve
jo-' Short Sleeve

Player and Club G
Musial, Cardinals 72
Robinson, Do'grs 74
Ashburn, Phillies 74
Fain, Athletics 74
Minoso, Wh. Sox 74
Williams, R'd Sox 75

AB
270
267
309
266
225
265

R H
61 100
56 96
48 111
35 92
67 87
67 89

Pct.
.370
.360
.359
.346
.341
.336

I III

EDUCATORS
and
LIBRARIANS
You are cordially
invited to visit our
STORY LAND
TOY TOWN

* * *
RUNS BATTED IN
National League
Westlake, Cardinals .............
Snider, Dodgers ..........
Hodges, Dodgers ...........
Musial, Cardinals ................
American League
Williams, Red Soe ..............
Robinson, White Sox.............
Stephens, Red Sox..............
HOME RUNS
National League
Hodges, Dodgers .................
Kiner, Pirates .................
Westlake, Cardinals . .....
Snider, Dodgers ..................
American League

61
58
54
54
76
68
58
28
19
18
is

13fitirbtuan :&ziIlj
SPORTS
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Zernial, Athletics.................19
Williams, Red Sox................ 16
Robinson, White Sox.............. 16
Wertz, Tigers ..................... 15
DO YOU KNOW . . . that in
Michigan's 71-year football his-
tory, the Wolvei~rnes have had

WAR SURPLUS

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Genuine Top Grain Leather I

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