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July 07, 1951 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-07-07

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SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Bosox Drop Y
BOston Victory Tightens
American League Race
By The Associated Pressg
Boston's Red Sox zoomed into
contention in the hot American
League race yesterday as they
knocked off the league leading
New York Yankees, 6-2, to move
within a game of first place in a
night game at Boston.
The extra base clouting of Dom
DhMaggio and Clyde Vollmer en-
abled the Bosox to throw the :
league race into utter turmoil as
the second place Chicago White
Box split a double header of the
twi-night variety with the Saint
Louis Browns.
DIMAGGIO was a thorn in the
side of the World Champion Yanks
as he sent the Red Sox into a
lead which they never relinquished:
* * * ~

inks as

White Sox Split

h i 1 y E" F 7r77) 777 .

Major League Standings

('.)

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

New York ....
Chicago .....
Boston .......
Cleveland ....
Detroit..
Washington..
Philadelphia.
St. Louis ....

W
45
47
45
42
33
29
28
22

L
27
29
29
31
36
43
46
50

Pct.
.625
.618
.608
.575
.478
.403
.378
.306

GB
1"
3Y
10 %
16
18
23

Brooklyn ....
New York ....
St. Louis .....
Cincinnati ,
Philadelphia
Boston......
Chicago ..
Pittsburgh ...

w
48
42
39
35
35
33
30
29

L
26
35
33
38
39
39
38
43

Pct.
.649
.545
.542
.479
.473
.458
.441
.403

G$
7%
8
13
14
15
18

* *
YESTERDAY'S

*
RESULTS

Boston 6, New York 2 (N).
Washington 6, Philadelphia 3 (N).
Chicago 4, St. Louis 3 (1st).
St. Louis 4, Chicago 1 (3nd N).
Cleveland 7, Detroit 4 (N).
* * *
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Boston-Reynolds (9-4)
vs. Taylor (4-6).
Cleveland at Detroit-Lemon (8-7)
vs. Cain (6-6).
Philadelphia at Washington (Night)
--Kellner (5-5) vs. Hudson (2-3).
Chicago at St. Louis-Rogovin (4-4)
vs. Pilette (3-6).

* * *
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 12, Boston 10.
Brooklyn 6, Philadelphia 2, (N).
Cincinnati 4, Chicago 2.
St. Louis 3, Pittsburgh 2, (N).
* *i *
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at New York--Surkont (7-6)
vs. Jones (2-6).
Cincinnati at Chicago-Blackwell
(7-7) vs. Leonard (6-2).
Brooklyn at Philadelphia-(Night)
Branca (6-2) vs. Roberts (10-6).
St. Louis at Pittsburgh-Lanier (5-
5) vs. Law (2-2).

Savitt Wins
A li-English
Tennis Title
WIMBLEDON, Eng.-(AP)-Dick
Savitt of Orange, N.J., added the
All-England Lawn Tennis Champ-
ionship to his Australian title to-
day by crushing tall Ken McGreg-
or of Australia, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4, in
their final match before 15,000 on
the center court.
A study in stroke perfection, the
handsome 26-year-old Cornell
University graduate outclassed the
Aussie Davis Cup star in every
phase of the game.
* * *
IN ACCEPTING the big silver
trophy from the Duchess of Kent,
Savitt became the first player of
any nation to win both the Wim-
bledon and Australian classics in
the same year since Don Budge
made his "Grand Slam" in 1938.
Later he came back to the cen-
ter court for a doubles match.
Savitt's form didn't hold in
the doubles, and he and Gard-
nar Mulloy of Miami, Fla., mow-
ed to Jarolsav Drobny of Egypt
and Eric Sturgess of South Af-
rica, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4, in a semi-
final clash.
In the other doubles semi-final,
McGregor and his Davis Cup
teammate, Frank Sedgman, made
short work of Budge Patty of Los
Angeles and Hamilton Richardson
of Baton Rouge, La., 6-4, 6-2, 6-3.

FOR SALE
FOR SALE--Record player automatic
change; mahogany lamp table. Phone
2-8696. )150
GOLF CLUBS-Matched set Joe Kirk-
wood clubs, 4 irons, 2 woods. Never
been used. $30.95. Ph. 2-8692. )149
1947 HARLEY-DAVIDSON 45 cu. in. mo-
torcycle. Excellent condition. See it
at Howell's on South U. Call John
Lauer, Univ. Ext. 2198. )146'
WOMEN'S GOLF CLUBS - 4 matched
irons, 1 wood. Brand new. Never been
used. $24.95. Ph. 2-8692. )145
FOR RENT
MODERN APARTMENT on Half Moon
Lake. Boat and utilities furnished.
July through September. Chelsea 7607.
)38F
APARTMENT-Complete kitchen, utili-
ties provided. Men preferred, near
campus. Call between 5-7 p.m., 6336.
906 Greenwood. )37F
ROOMS FOR RENT
WASHTENAW AREA - Pleasant single
room with private lavatory and toilet.
Gentlemen preferred. 2-3868. )77R

LOST AND FOUND ROOMS FOR RENT
PARKER 51 PEN-Black and silver, gold SHARE PAR iET ith Grad Sl
clip on Madison, State Angell Hall. dent. Save on meals 8 we. 13:.
Reward. Ralph L. Christensen 2-8234. yard, continuous hot water. Cal
)100L 31791. )til

CAMPUS Tourist Home. Rooms by Day
or Week. Bath, Shower. TelexisiOn.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8424. )IR

GIRLS ROOMING HOUSE TYPING -~ Rasonabnle rates, accurate
Large studio type room. Two closets. wrk. Pbone 3-4040. )35B
Two beds. Caimmunityv kitchen. B- -.--_______
tween campus 4hospitas. . 2-22 - LIFE at less than the cost of a
)8l1R bowl of eherrias. Under 8c an issue
at tbe special rates offered by the
MISCELLANEOUS ITUDNT PERIODICAL AGENCY,
Ph<one 2- 242. )34B
AT LIBERTY-German 11 and 12 in- TYPING wANTED to do in my home,
structor does tutoring and translation Experienced Ph. 7590, 0 S. Main
A. R. Neinnann, 2-7909. _ )1411 )328
ROOM AND BOARD WAV1IN , tinished work, and hand
-- -------- ------ ironing. ut dry anid wet washing.
FOOD FOOD FOOD - Home co ked Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
meals for men. Excellent food and and delivery. Phone 2-9020. We spe-
coffee. 1319 Hill. )4X clalize in doing summer dresses.
CONTINUOUS
,,eFROMt 1 P.M.
"FIGHTING
COAST GUARD
TOMOR ROW - STARTS SUNDAY
RICHARD DANA GARY

DOM DIMAGGIO
. . . sparks Bosox

R&CM AND BOARD
13xPID ATIC FRAVTERIiTY HOUSE -
Short block trom Law Quad, corner
H.l and O land. Eat ing; scheduie at
Ir nionre. Really good food,
BUS1NE~SS SERVICES

a double header with the
Louis Browns.

Faulkner Takes British Open
In CloseRain-Soaked Finale

Saint

ED LOPAT
... Boston Bait

with a tw orun homer in the
his seventh of the season.

sixth,

Southpaw Mel Parnell held
the Yankees to nine scattered
hits as he won his tenth game
of the season and his third
against the Bombers.
Ed Lopat started for New York
and gave the Red Sox all but one
of their ten hits before being re-
placed by Jack Kramer in the
seventh.
THE WHITE SOX tied in the
"Games Behind" column with the
Yanks but remain six percentage
points from the lead as they split
Baseball's

Big Six
Player and Club 0 AB R
Musial, Cardinals 70 262 59
Robinson, Dodg's 73 263 56
Ashburn, Phillies 73 304 48'
Minoso, White Sox 70 247 67
Fain, Athletics 73 262 35
Williams, Rd Sox 73 259 65

I!
96
95
109
86
90
86

Pet.
.368
.361
.3S9
.348
.344
.332

Chicago won the first game,
4-3, as Ken Holcombe pitched
four hit ball until relieved dur-
ing a Saint Louis uprising which
produced two runs in the eighth.
Dick Starr pitched eight innings
for the Brownies. Speedster Jim
Busby homered for the Chicago-
ans with none on in the seventh.
In the second game, Brownie
ace hurler Ned Garver pitched
his way to a 4-1 win and his
eleventh win of the season. Garver
kept nine hits fairly well scattered
in turning in the triumph.
* * *
THE BROWNIES wrapped up
the game in the sixth as they
pounced on Chisox starter Howie
Judson for three runs to break a
1-1 tie.
In other American League
night games, Washington beat
Philadelphia at Griffith sta-
dium, 6-3, and Cleveland bested
Detroit, 7-4, to continue its
mastery of the Bengals. Bob
Feller started and won for the
Tribe although Lou Brissie re-
lieved in the eighth.
Meanwhile in Philadelphia the
National League leading Brook-
lyn Dodgers combined a four run
flareup in the first frame with
splendid relief pitching by Carl
Erskine to whip the Phillies, 6-2,
last night before 31,000 fans.
GIL HODGES hit his 28th hom-
er of the season in the first frame
and it put the burly Dodger first
baseman four games ahead of
Babe Ruth's record breaking year.
The Babe didn't hit his 28th until
the 79th game of the season in
the year in which he clouted 60
for the big league record.
Erskine relieved starting pit-
cher Clarence Podbelian in the
fourth with the bases loaded
and two out and permitted only
five hits, the rest of the way
and fanned five for hisdeighth
victory against eight defeats.
Russ Meyers started for the
Phils followed by Andy Hansen,
Ken Heintzelman and Jim Kon-
stanty.
* * *
NEW YORK'S second place
Giants reeling from three straight
losses to Brooklyn bounced back
with four runs in the eighth inn-
ing to trip the Boston Braves,
12-10 in a homer laden contest.
Each club hit three homers
but a combination of singles won
for the Giants in the ninth in a
??? game played in New York.
The teams hit five homers in
the third inning to tie a major
league record for the most homers
by two teams in an inning.
* * *
DAVE KOSLO, last of four New
York pitchers was tabbed with
the win. Jim Hearn started for
the Polo Grounders.
In another day game Chicago
Cubs fell two runs short in the
ninth despite a rally as Cincin-
nati defeated them, 4-2.
Ken Ragensburger put out the
fire for the Reds in the final
frame after starter Harry Perkos-
ki wasremoved. The Cubs outhit
the Reds, ten to eight, but de-
spite that Paul Minner, Cub left-
hander, was stung with his seventh
defeat of the season, as he went
all the way.
In Pittsburgh the Cardinals
sparked by former Pirate Wally
Westlake won a night game from
the Bucs, 3-2. Westlake drove in
two runs to aid George Munger's
fourth win.

PORTRUSH, Northern Ireland
-(P)-Methodical Max Faulkner,
a par-wrecking Englishman who
spent one winter milking cows to
strengthen his golfing hands, won
the British Open Championship
yesterday in a dramatic rain-
soaked finish.
Playing sub-par golf for every
round except the last, Faulkner
captured the 72-hole event with a'
score of 285-highest since 1937
-and two strokes better than his
closest pursuer.
* * *
BUT THERE were some breath-
less moments after Max finished,
for handsome little Antonio Cerda
of the Argentine was scorching the
Royal Portrush course.
But he slashed a drive up
against some steps straddling a
barbed wire fence along the
16th fairway, and it took Cerda
four strokes to reach the green.
Cerda finished with a 287 for
second place. Faulkner, who
blasted a two under par 70 in
the morning round, had a 74 in
the afternoon. Cerda shot a 71,
then a 70.

Frank Stranahan of Toledo,
Ohio, one of two Americans left
in the tournament, wound up as
the leading amateur in the open
for the third straight time, with
a total of 295. His final round 73
gave him a tie for 12th place with
two professionals, Dick Burton of
England and Dai Rees of Wales.
* * *
ANOTHER OHIOAN, Sergeant
Charles (Chuck) Rotar, onetime
Canton pro now with the United
States Army in Germany, got a
75 and a total of 303.
Charley Ward, a little British
Ryder Cup player, clung to the
leaders' flanks with a scorching
68 on his last round, and got
third with a total of 290.
Fred Daly, a curly-haired Irish-
man who won the Open in 1947,
and big Jimmy Adams of Scotland
who led on the first day, tied for
fourth with 292's.
The great Bobby Locke, seeking
his third straight British Open
crown, lost his famous putting
skill and wound up with a 293 in
a tie for sixth with four others.

Read and Use
CLASSIFIEDS
DAILY

J

VIDEO EXPERIMENT:
NCAA Explains TV Plans for Football

BORIS HART of Miami and
Shirley Fry of Akron, O., who
clash in tomorrow's all-American
women's singles final, qualified to-
gether for the play off in women's
doubles as they trounced Beverly
Baker of Santa Monica, Calif.,
and Nancy Chaffee of Ventura,
Calif., 6-0, 6-2.
Their opponents will be the
defending champions, Lquise
Brough of Beverly Hills and
Mrs. and Mrs. Margaret Os-
borne Dupont of Wilmington,
Del., who defeated Mrs. Barbara
Scofield Davidson of San Fran-
cisco and Betty Rosenquest of
South Orange, N.J., 6-1, 6-3.
Miss Brough and Eric Sturgess
of South Africa, who were the de-
fending champions in Mixed
Doubles, were eliminated in to-
day's semi-final by Mervyn Rose
and Mrs. Nancy Wynne Bolton of
Australia, 7-5, 6-2.

JS c 6i en, a { t
BEGINS
ITS SUMMER SERIES
WITH
c ~lIiEN4IBRkAJIDiF
MR. CHARLES LAUGHTON 4
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM 50c (tax included)
Friday and Saturday at 7:30 and 9:30
p

RUNS BATTED IN
National League
Westlake, Cardinals...............59
Snider, Dodgers .......... 57
Musial, Cardinals................. 54
American League
Williams, Red Sox ..74
Robinson, White Sox.............. 68
Stephens, Red Sox................ 58
* * *

CHICAGO-GP)-The National
Collegiate Athletic Association
yesterday began laying ground
work for televising college foot-
ball games this fall.
The Television Committee of
the NCAA, headed by Tom Hamil-
ton, Director of Athletics at the
University of Pittsburgh, discussed
the situation with representatives
of four advertising agencies who
appeared in behalf of potential
sponsors.
FRANCIS MURRAY, Director
of Athletics at the University of
Pennsylvania, which has been de-
clared "not in good standing" by
the NCAA, also appeared before
the committee at his own request.
Pennsylvania's decision to televise
its home games in defiance of the
NCAA's policy led to the not-in-
good standing ruling.
Chairman Hamilton explained
that Television contracts will be
negotiated by individual univer-
sities, but each market district,
under the committee's plan, will

i

have three of 10 Saturdays when
no home game will be televised.
Each market district, he said,
will be limited to one TV game
on the remaining seven dates
and individual institutions are
limited to one appearance at
home and one away from home.
The nine-man Television com-
mittee will not participate in the
selection of games and no school is
required to televise, Hamilton said.
He added the committee would
recommend to the NCAA council
that a share of the receipts of
televised games be paid the NCAA
to help pay the cost of the survey
to determine the effect of Televi-
sion on attendance.
* * * -
THE EXECUTIVE Committee
of the NCAA selected the Univer-
sity of California as the site of
the 1952 Track and Field Cham-
pionship Meet. The dates are June
13 and 14.
The other Championship
events and dates are: Swim-

ming: Princeton, March 27-29;
Wrestling: Colorado A. & M.,
March 28-29; Ice Hockey: Colo-
rado College, March 13-15;
Gymnastics: Colorado, March
21-22; Boxing: Wisconsin, April
3-5.
Hole-In-One Again
In Canadian Open
TORONTO-(/P) -The second
Hole-In-One in the same major
tournament gave the Golfing Fra-
ternity plenty to talk about yes-
terday and took a lot of glory
from the fighting stand of Jack
Burke, Jr., of Houston, Tex.
More than an hour after Burke
had made a great recovery to
hang on to a dwindling lead by
two strokes in the Canadian Open,
Pat Palmieri of White Plains, N.Y.,
dropped an ace on the 14th with-
out benefit of gallery. Ironically,
Palmieri doesn't qualify for to-
morrow's final 18-hole round.

HOME RUNS
National League
Hodges, Dodgers.................
Kiner, Pirates .......t............
Snider, Dodgers .................
Westlake, Cardinals.............
American League
Zernial, Athletics...............
Robinson, White Sox............
Williams, Red Sox...............

TODAY!

LATE S OW TONIGHT
Last Feature at 1 1 P.M.

27
19
18
18
.19
16
15

V _

U

MEALS 50e up
Breakfast.. .7:00-10:00
Lunch. . ....1 :00-1 :30
Dinner .....5:00-7:00
MEAL MART
CAFETERIA
338 Maynard, Thru the Arcade
omono ono (1

I

Read and Use
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

Famous Names of the Silent Era
CHAPLIN in "The Circus" (1929) July 9
FAIRBANKS, Sr. "The Three Musketeers" (1926) July 16
GARBO in "The Kiss" (1929) July 30
Clara BOW in "The Primrose Path" August 6
Lillian and

.

P
n L. G. RALFOUR. CO.
U Er) A 7-rn K I I-r\ / I -I A /r1 r) 111

I

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