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July 04, 1951 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-07-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Y, JULY 4, 1951

"JL'HE MICHMAN DAILY

PAM l wVVP.

THE MTCHT1~AN s ATT eF1' sV

tlsarlar j

.V

FROM SUNBATHING TO

DANCING:

Cottons Designed Now for Every

Occasion
* * *

BATTLE OF SEXES:
Women Now Have Blessings,
Not Problems, Says Columnist

I

* * *

4>

Cotton Satin Fashion
Popular This Summer
By JO KETELHUT
Whether the coed demands
simply tailored, sophisticated, or
frankly feminine dresses, there's
an outfit fashioned of cotton to
suit her particular taste this sum-
mer.
From the most ingenue to the
sleekest look, cotton is high fash-
ion. It is possible to own a cotton
dress now that has been designed
with all the fine detail usually re-
served for only the most expen-
sive fabrics.
THERE ARE clothes for every
dress-up occasion from casual mo-
vie dates to country club dancing
-and all activities in between.
A shining example of fash-
ion's aversion to cottons this
year is the enthusiastic accept-
ance of cotton satin. Introduced
only last year, cotton satin fash-
ions now carry designer-labels
famous the world over. Ameri-
can, as well as French designers,
have used this fabric for almost
every type of costume. They
have featured it this year for
sports, daytime clothes, evening
styles and luxurious negligees.
On the beach, cotton satin has
shown a trend to outshine almost
every other fabric. One designer
features a bathing suit in white
cotton satin, tinsel-embroidered in
gold. As a companion cover-up to
this, there is a full dress beach
jacket in the same tinsel-embroi-
dered fabric.
ADDED FASHION news is the
vogue for cotton satin separates-
jackets, skirts, halter and camisole
bodices, shorts and duster.
Color-wise, this fashion fabric
bids for the approval of all,
since its brilliant surface is a
natural foil for the reproduction
of rich color. Colors this year
include brilliant r e d s a n d
oranges, mauves, violets, deep
rich tans and browns, navy and;
pastel blues, lemony yellows
and, of course, black and white.
Cotton satin is not only featur-
c. in long lists of colors but it is
also printed in gold and silver.
Metallic prints include florals, ab-.
stracts and East Indian types.
* * *
ANOTHER TYPE of printing
called flocking, also reproduces
prints in florals and leaf designs
in a raised velvet effect. These
prints give an added luxurious
look'to black, white and beige cot-
ton satin.
Brand new this year are two
developments In this fabric.

DANCING-Deceptively demure
is this design, a gingham made
with a deep squared neckline
and short puffed sleeves. An in-
dented waist tops a full skirt
with patch pockets. There's a
faint white pinline stripe run-
ning through the absinthe green
cotton.

COCKTAILS-For the sophisti-
cate, one designer has styled a
two-piece ensemble of sheer
beige tissue made with a dainty
self-colored pattern. The sleeve-
less coat is spiked with gold em-
broidered pockets, embellished
with multi-colored threads. Gold
metallic outlines the deep arm-
holes and is repeated on the bo-
dice of the soft shirtwaist dress.

One is a cotton satin embossed
with a piquelike texture. It is
particularly effective used by de-
signers for convertible jackets
and low-cut decolletage dresses
which are suitable for day and
evening.
The second newdevelopment is
cotton satin embossed with a
moire texture. It is exclusive with
two designers for its introduction
this season.
* * *
GLAMOROUS COTTON satin
with its high style appeal also re-
tains all the characteristics such
as washability and durability. It
is also wrinkle, spot and soil re-
sistant.
Fabric interest has played an
important role in this develop-
ment. Even more significant are
the functional qualities of this
most used of all textiles.
League Events
Ballroom dance classes and
duplicate bridge will both be
held tonight at the League.
Students may still sign up for
the square dancing classes
which are held on Monday eve-
nings and the ballroom dance
classes which are held Wednes-
day evenings.

July Has Ruby
As Birthstone
July's birthstone is the ruby, a
gem according to legend, symbol-
izing charity, dignity and divine
power.
Because of its beauty and rar-
ity, it has always been considered#
valuable. Kings and emperors
sought rubies for their crowns and
gave their most beautiful red
gems as love tokens to beautiful
princesses. *
WHEN CUT encabocho-dome
shaped-the ruby will sometimes
show a six-ray star, similar to
that in a star sapphire. One of the
fascinating characteristics of the
star ruby is that as often as it is
cut, each part will still show a
star. The largest star ruby, in the
Morgan collection, weighs 100
carats.
The most desired color for a
ruby is called "Pigeon's Blood"
-a bluish red. The best quality
rubies, including the pigeon
blood variety, come from Bur-
ma. Lesser rubies are found in
Ceylon, Afghanistan, Australia,
Madagascar, Borneo and the
United States.
In the fashion world, rubies are
very popular items when set in
gold. Combined with multi-col-
ored stones they are being shown;
in handsome clips, rings, earrings,
and pins.
THEY ARE also being set with
diamonds in gold watch cases, and
at the terminals where wrist
band joins the watch.
The ruby has always been con-
sidered a masculine as well as a
feminine gem and is particularly
appropriate for rings, cuff links,
jeweled tie clasps and studs for
men.

We hear too much about wo-
men's problems and not enough
about their blessings, Robert Ru-
ark, columnist, said in an attack
on the modern woman in a recent
issue of anational magazine.
Women's problems today are
largely imaginary, Ruark declares.
Describing himself as "a represen-
tative without portfolio of the
American male," he contends that
the feminine contingent in this
country is sitting just about as
pretty as any group in the history
of the world.
* * 4
THANKS TO the 19th Amend-
ment, Freud, diaper services, and
a doormat population, they can
have their pie and eat it too, he
says.
Having won their battle for
equal rights, women have at the
same time refused to give up
their ancient privileges, he says.
They want a man's seat on the
bus as well as his job, in the
columnist's opinion, and now-
adays have very nearly got them
both.
Among the women holding down
what past generations would have
considered strictly a man's job,
he names Anna Rosenberg, Babe
Didrikson, Senator M a r g a r e t
Chase Smith, Perle Mesta, Doro-
thy Shaver, president of Lord and
Taylor and Eleanor C. Darnton,
head of the Women's National
News Service.
S* *
"THE AVERAGE dame is about
as fragile in the mind as Leo Dur-
Cloth Shoes
RequireCare
Gay colored shoes of shantung
and linen are a bright and popular
addition to the summer fashion
scene, but they need specialrcare
to keep them fresh and colorful.
Dust them with a soft brush
after each wearing, advise manu-
facturers. Then, they say, wash
them before they get too dirty.
Household information services
caution that the washing must be1
done carefully, and results can-
not be guaranteed.
The procedure outlined by man-t
ufacturers is this: put shoes on
shoetrees; make a thick suds of aT
mild detergent cleanser and
lukewarm water; using the suds-
no water, brush the shoes gentlyt
with the grain of the fabric; wipe
the soiled suds away with a clean,
dry cloth.r
The shoes will be slightly dam-I
pened by this treatment, say ad-
visors, but will not be wet. Theyr
also warn wearers to keep their
shoes away from direct heat and
sunlight.t
Phys. Ed. Classes
Registration for sport classes
in the Women's Physical Edu-
cation Department will stay
open during this week. Inter-
mediate and beginning tennis,
golf and swimming are being
offered, as well as archery, bad-
minton and modern dance.
Men and women may sign up
in Office 15 at Barbour Gym.

ocher," Ruark declares in the ar-
ticle. He adds that she is physical-
ly tough too, and that he "would
hate to tangle with any lass with
a solid background of tennis,
swimming and dancing the rhum-
b a."
As wives, they control the
family purse, and if they want
a divorce, he says, they have the
best of it there as well.
Ruark decries present divorce
laws as outmoded and unfair to
men. He maintains that the courts
give women an unequal advantage
in the matter of alimony and cus-
tody of children which is not in
keeping with women's present eco-
nomic independence.
Marriage Rate
Remains High
After 10 Years
There were fewer young women
in the United States this June eli-
gible for marriage than in any
year since the 1920's, statistics
show.
The reason, say authorities, is
that most young women in the
nation are already married, due
to the high marriage rate which
has been continuing now for ten
years.
BECAUSE MEN in America
customarily marry women young-
er than themselves, there are con-
siderably more young bachelors
wandering about at large than
there are unmarried women. In
the age group between 20 and 24,
the ratio is nearly three single
men for every two single women.
At ages over 35, the number
of single women, widows and
divorced women far exceeds the
number of unmarried men, be-
cause there are so many more
older women in the population
than there are older men.
Ever since the end of the war,
the number of unmarried young
women has been declining until
now only a third of all women be-
tween 20 and 24 are unmarried
and only fifteen percent of all wo-
men between 25 and 30.
* s* s E
THE 1,670,000 marriages which
took place in 1950 reduced very
greatly the number of single wo-
men, even from 1949 levels. These
1950 marriages accounted for
nearly one out of every ten un-
married women who were over the
age of 14.
To judge by the experience of
those states which record ages of
marriage, most of these 1950
brides were under 25.

""

Sizes from 9
! WhiteU
0 Pastels
* Darks
* Checks
4r"-Z

sale!

Summer
Suits

k

800o

most famous summer fabric
You'd know in a second what
unusual buys these are if we could
tell you the name of the famous,
nationally advertised maker.
Chances are you'll recognize the
wonderfully cool rayon-and-wool
fabric, the fine tailoring and the
superb styling which you've seen in
the fashion magazines. Not every
style and color in your size, of
course, but there's a good selec-
tion-so hurry in while it lasts.

_-._ - I

AFTER-TH E-FOURTH
THREE GROUPS
Dresses $5-18-11
TWO GROUPS

I I
1

THE SHORT BOB
FOR LADIES
* individually styled
0 five hair stylists
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State

JIL

SOUTH STATE OFF NORTH U.

AS ADVERTISED IN CHARM

WEDGE IN WIDTHS
AAAA to B
$139,

y 1 l ,
,. VGGI

I

e
r
oof
r

I'

Skirts
Blouses $289

389 _$689

and $489
. .X189

BLUE
RED
WHITE

T-Shirts .. 4

Se.
Ise

ALL-NYLON
SWIM

You'd expect to pay 12.95 to 16.95

895

SUITS
coral,
actually
mart,
32 to 38.

i

One of our new casuals that feature

Values to 3.95
Swim Suits from$69

fit in 6 shoe

widths. Soft, soft leathers and all-over airy
perforations add to comfort, the comfort'
born in every Selby ARCH PRESERVER.

I

:a-jewel suits in Haiti blue, mint, navy, gold, lilac,
aqua or black ... all wonderful styles you have
een at higher prices in the same fine fabric. Look s
while you save precious vacation dollars. Sizes

s

h
.me S Y

II

i

I

I

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