100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 04, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-07-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 1951

.-THE MICHIGTAN fAILS ....54JY5.E .....~

I X

pk txr, aa .
,.

.

Independence Day Preview

i
I

PICTURE

NEWS

*

* ?, #

JUNIOR 'HOTRODS'-WilRogers, 16, of Redwood
City, Cal., looks over some tiny autos he has fashioned out of tin
cans. In background are several prizes he has won with his work.

'COLLEGE CAPER' - Nancy Bastian, University of
Chicago co-ed, performs on the trapeze in "A Midnight Fantasy,"
a gymnastic-musical show in which students annually participate.

'4

-Daily-Robert Lewis
THESE WOMEN WILL BE JOINED TODAY AT PALMER FIELD BY DROVES OF STUDENTS CELEBRATING THEIR INDEPENDENCE
O'' .

First Quartet
Concert Set
For Tuesday
The first performance of "Piano
Quintet, Op. 47" by Wallingford
Riegger, which was composed on
the commission-of the University
especially for the summer Quartet
series, will highlight the first of
three concerts by the Stanley
Quartet, at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday,
July 10, in Rackham Lecture Hall.
In addition to music school fa-
culty members Gilbert Ross and
Emil Raab, violinists; Robert
Courte, violist; and Oliver Edel,
cellist; John Kirkpatrick of 0or-
nell University, guest lecturer in
piano, will be featured in one of
the selections.
* s s
COMPOSER RIEGGER, born in
Albany, Georgia, in 1885, receivedi
his musical education in the Uni-
ted States and Germany. He has
achieved much renown recently,
as a composer, with performances
of his "Third Symphony," which
won the New York Music Critics'
Circle Award in 1948, and his
widely played "Second String
Quartet."
The other selections to be part
of the concert on July 10 are
"Quartet in F Major, Op. 77, No.
2" by Haydn, and "Quartet in G
Major, Op. 161" by Schubert.
Other concerts will be presented
on July 24 and Aug. 7.
All concerts will be held in
Rackham Lecture Hall and are
free of charge.

City To Be Site of Most
'U' July 4 Celebrations

Conference
Discusses

By SANDY SCHLAGER f
"Most University students plan1
to observe the Fourth of July rightt
here in Ann Arbor," according to
the ticket agent at the New York
Central Railroad Station, . whof
states that there has been a sur-
prisingly small amount of railroad
tickets sold.
* * *J
WITH CLEAR weather prelict-x
ed, many students have plannedi
"activities of a group nature" at:
nearby lakes. For those who in-
tend to drive, the Washtenaw,
County Sheriff's Office and the
Ann Arbor City Police Department
Spanish Group
Tea Planned
A welcoming reception for all
Spanish students will be held by
the Spanish Society at 8 p.m. to-I
morrow in the East Conference;
room of the Rackham building.
Prof. Charles Staubach, chair-
man elect of the romance lang-;
uage department for next fall and,
Prof. Laurence Kiddle, acting head
of the department will present a
general outline of the MA and
Doctorate program which the de-
partment offers.
A social meeting with refresh-
ments will follow.

extend their usual warnings. There
have been no fatalities as yet over
the long Fourth of July weekend
and Deputy Sheriff Wagner of the
Washtenaw County Sheriff's Of-
fice states that motorists can avert
accidents by "Simply observing the
common courtesies of the road and
keeping speed down."
For those who are unable to en-
joy the privileges of an automobile
but plan to spend the day hiking
in the wooded areas around Ann
Arbor, Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, Di-
rector of the Health Service, warns
against stepping into poison ivy.
The University Golf Course
expects one of its heaviest ttrn-
outs of the year, according to
harry Kaseberg, manager of the
course. On previous holidays ac-
tivity has been heaviest in the
morning and early afternoon
and begins to taper off about
2:30 p.m.," Gaseberg says, "This
gives students an opportunity to
enjoy a free afternoon."
Palmer Field and tennis courts
throughout the city anticipate a
large turnout.
Those who tire of the round of
activities that Ann Arbor has to
offer can observe a parade in near-
by Ypsilanti, where Governor Men-
nen G. Williams will lead the fes-
tivities.
A double header baseball game
in Detroit between the Tigers and
the Chicago White Sox may at-
tract some students.

Short Story
In teaching the short story to
high school and college students,
the central concern should be with
the story itself, a group of high
school and college teachers agreed
Monday.
The teachers were part of a
panel which led a discussion of
"Teaching the Short Story" at the
second meeting of the Conference
of English Teachers held in the
Assembly Hall of Rackham.
TEACHERS ALBERTINE Loom-
is of Highland Park Junior Col-
lege and Ray W. MacLoughlin of
Trenton High School were in
agreement on the importance of
the historical aspect of teaching
fiction, but they differed as to ap-
proach.
"I prefer to stress the aesthetic
approach to the short story bring-
ing in the historical element to
lend more meaning to the story,"
Miss Loomis said. She believed
that the general trend was away
from the historical approach.
MacLoughlin declared that the
historical approach was the most
important aspect of teaching the
short story and a knowledge of the
author's background was "essen-
tial to the student's understanding
of the story."
Read Daily Classifieds

' HUNGRY AS A BEAR'-Two polar bears in the
Rome Zoo prove the popular expression as they stand up and beg
for bread with outstretched paws: while others wait for food.

MEETING OF THE WATERS -Yolande Betbeze,
Miss America of 1950, pours water from Hudson River into Seine
symbolizing Franco-American friendship on bi-millenium of Paris.
Eiffel Tower and miniature Statue of Liberty are in background.

SAVE AT SAM'S STORE
Iii ummer Special5

71-

71

4

Short Sleeve
SPORT SHIRTS
$1*49

U.S. Navy
"T" SHIRTS
4c
* First Quality

' Sanforized

II

I

ALL WEATHER JACKETS
e ZIPPER FRONT
* ELASTIC BOTTOM

A LFlUNDRY SERVICE
STUDENL%4T
4LBS. S c
minimum
12c each additional pound
All your clothing laundered,
FLUFF DRIED and NEATLY FOLDED
____LOW EXTRA CHARGE
for finishing these articles

HAUSFRAU'S BOON
~-This portable German shower
demonstrated in Munich is oper-
- ~ ated by foot pedals which pump
'AIRCRAFT CARRI ER' IN THAI LAND-Alight bomber,obtainedfromUS,used water steadily from the foot
fo t ChaFan C A r i pE'H upAr on b e fm Bao hto isbser, f oeraons.,tub to the.shower spray.
for the Thailand Air Force is poled up river on barge from Bangkok to its base of operations.

PLAY SHORTS
'.49
* !"Assorted Colors

Brief Style
SWIM TRUNKS
199
O Assorted Colors

1

I

SHIRTS, additional ... .............. ..
(Full dress shirts and silk or wool sport
shirts slightly higher)
HANDKERCHIEFS ................. .c
SOX, pr. ............ ........... . .

17c

bh

3c
3c

I

MEN'S WASH PANTS
S99

Just Phone 23-123
S .51

I

- III

11

®l

e

.:.
.:..: _

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan