100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 30, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-06-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

&ATURDAY, JUNE 30, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

RAGE THREE

Phillies Nip Slumping Dodgers

Curious Fly
Livens PGA
Comipetiion
Snead, Furgol
Argue onRuling
OAKMONT, Pa.-(A)--The de-
fending champion, medalist and
four former titlists were swept
from the Professional Golfers As-
sociation tournament yesterday,
but these rocky incidents were
completely over-shadowed by the
case of the curious fly.
The vagrant insect-variously
described as a tiny butterfly or a
gnat-figured in the stormy sec-
ond round match between Sam
Snead and Marty Furgol which
was won by Snead with a birdie
three on the 21st hole.
THE MATCH, followed by a
yelling throng of some 5,000, was
finished about dusk after a series
of huddles by the brains of the
PGA.
Furgol, 32-year-old Lemont,
Il., professional, protested on
the 14th green that Snead vio-
lated a rule when he stooped
down to blow an insect off his
bal.
Snead contended he didn't
touch or clean the pellet and thus
had broken no regulations.
WHEN IT WAS impossible to
get a ruling immediately, Furgol
continued under protest and
matched Snead stroke for stroke
right up to the 18th where they
finished all square.
Later Furgol withdrew his
protest and play continued.
Snead won on the 21st hole.
Snead thus was left one of the
few giants remaining in the field
of 16 after two full rounds of
eliminations, from sunup to sun-
downon the 6,882-yard, par 72
Oakmont course.
OTHER favorites to prevail in-
eluded Lloyd Mangrum of Niles,
Ill., the leading money winner
and top choice for the title; Jim
Perrier, the sure-putting former
Australian; huge Vi. Ghezzi of
Inwood, N.Y., champion in 1941.
Ferrier won the title in 1947.
Nine extra hole matches were
played during the long, dreary
day with one of them eliminat-
ing Chandler Harper of Ports-
mouth, Va.
The slender Virginian fretting
with stomach and club-swinging
troubles, was ushered to the side-
lines by Jim Turnesa of Briarcliff,
N.Y., who rallied to square the
match on the 18th and then won
it with a 25-foot, over-hill putt
on the 23rd.
Completely fatigued from his
gruelling match, the swarthy Tur-
nesa bowed in the second round
to Charles Bassler of Catonsville,
D., 5 and 4.
N.I

1 11

it

Major League Standings

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Chicago .....
New York ....
Boston.......
Cleveland....
Detroit ......
Washington ..
Philadelphia .
St. Lquis .....

w
43
42
39
35
31
25
26
19

L
23
23
27
30
31
39
41
46

Pct.
.662
.646
.591
.554
.500
.390
.388
.292

GB
M,
4
71K
10
171
17% '
23 L

Brooklyn ....
New York ....
St. Louis .....
Philadelphia.
Cincinnati ...
Boston .......
Chicago .....
Pittsburgh ...
*

w
4?
38

L
25
31

Pet. GB
.621 ..
.551 41f

33 32
35 33
32 33
30 34
28 33
25 39
* *

.508
.500
.492
.469
.459
.391

8
81K
10
10!
15

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 2, Boston 1.
Chicago 10, St. Louis 3.
Cleveland 4, Detroit 1.
Philadelphia 3-11, Washington 2-5.
* * *
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Chicago-Starr (0-3)
vs. Dobson (5-1).
Boston at New York-Stobbs (5-3)
vs. Kuzava (4-3).
Detroit at Cleveland - Hutchinson
(6-2) or Newhouser (5-5) vs. Wynn
(5-9).
Washington at Philadelphia--More-
no (2-4) vs. Fowler (3-4).

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 3, Brooklyn 2.
Chicago 6, St. Louis 6 (called, end
of nine, because of train schedules).
Boston at New York, postponed,
rain.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati postponed
(rain).
* * *
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Boston (Night) Jansen
(8-6) vs. Bickford (8-7).
Philadelphia at Brooklyn-Church
(8-3) vs. Schmitz (1-3).
Chicago at Cincinnati-Lown (1-4)
vs. Fox (Earl).
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (Night)-
Dickson (9-6) vs. Chambers (3-8).

Larsen, Sedgman, Sturgess
Win in Wimbledon Matches
WIMBLEDON, Eng.-tom)-Artful Art Larsen, the latest racquet
wizard from California, continued yesterday to demonstrate to Wim-
bledon fans how he won last year's American title as he turned back
another good player with a minimum of effort to reach the quarter-
final round of the All-England championships.
The wiry little lefthander again kept complete control of the
court in subduing Torsten Johannsson of Sweden's Davis Cup Team,
6-3, 7-5, 6-4.
* * * *
THREE OTHER international stars-Frank Sedgman and Ken
McGregor of Australia and Eric Sturgess, the steady South African
-accompanied the American champion into the round of eight. The
remianing fourth round matches, three of them involving Americans,
are scheduled to be played tomorrow.
McGregor eliminated Paul Remy of France, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Sedgman, No. 1 seeded, crushed Fausto Gardini, the young Ital-
ian who Thursday upset Gardnar Mulloy of Miami. The one-
sided scores were 6-0, 6-2, 6-1.
Sturgess, who defeated Sedgman in last week's London champion-
ships at Queen's Club, brushed aside Bernard Destremau of France,
6-2, 6-3, 6-2.
In today matches, Herbie Flam of Beverly Hills meets Hans Van
Swol of the Netherlands; Dick Savitt of Orange, N.J., tackles the
veteran Josef Asboth of Hungary; Hamilton Richardson, the 17-year-
old surprise package from Baton Rouge, plays Armando Vieria of
Brazil, and Tony Mottram of England faces Lennart Bergelin of
Sweden.

JACKIE ROBINSON
... homers in vain
Bucks'Duo
In College
Golf Finale
COLUMBUS, O. - (P) - Ohio
State's No. 1 and 2 golfers, Tom
Nieporte andDon Johnson, yes-
terday shot their way into the
National Collegiate golf champ-
ionship finals.
Nieporte, OSU's No. 1 man, was
deadly with his approach shots as
he eliminated Buster Reed of
North Texas State, two up. John-
son, who was sworn into the Air
Force in the morning, put out his
semi - final opponent - Notre
Dame's Tom Matey, 2 and 1.
Nieporte and Johnson tee off
in the 36-hole finals at ,8 a.m.
(CST) today.
Johnson, No. 2 on Ohio's golf
squad, beat John Weaver of Rice,
t he Southwestern Conference
champion, one up in 20 holes in
this morning's quarter-finals.
In the upper bracket, his team-
mate, Nieporte of Cincinnati,
marched on into the semifinals
with a 2 and 1 verdict over John
Carson of the University of Geor-
gia.
In other quarterfinal contests,
Buster Reed-of North TexasState
toppled Wesley Ellis:of the Uni-
versity of Texas, 2 and 1, and
Tom Matey of Notre Dame chop-
ped down John McCall of Colgate.

Yanks Win;
Indians ToP
Tigers,_-1
Roberts' Hurling1
Gives Phils Win
By The Associated Press
BROOKLYN-Ralph Caballero's
ninth-inning triple and a two-
run homer by Del Wilber in the
fifth gave Philadelphia a 3-2 win
over Brooklyn tonight, clipping
the Dodgers' lead to 42 games.
Robin Roberts held the Brooks
to five hits in hanging up his
ninth victory.
* * *
BROOKLYN home runs, by
Jackie Robinson and Duke Snider,
were the only run-producing hits
off Roberts.
Joe DiMaggio's eighth inning
double scored Phil Rizzuto with
the winning run as the New
York Yankees defeated the Bos-
ton Red Sox, 2-1, behind Vie
Raschi's three-hit itching. It
was that righthanded ace's 12th
win against four losses.
The Yanks collected seven hits
off lefty Maury McDermott and
broke a 1-1 tie in the fifth when
Hank Bauer lashed a two-bagger.
All-Star Game
Voting Closes
CHICAGO - (P) - The total
vote in the 1951 All-Star base-
ball poll headed toward 4,000,-
00 today as the contest came
to a rousing end at midnight.
The Chicago White Sox, cur-
rently leading the American
League race, hold the lead at
three infield positions in the
latest tabulation. The leading
White Sox players were Nelson
Fox at second base, Chico Car-
rasquel at short, and Eddie
Robinson at first.
Jackie Robinson, Dodger sec-
ond baseman, continued to hold
a wide lead over Al "Red"
Schoendienst, St .Louis Card
inals. Robinson has piled up
1,189,461 votes, thirdhhighest
individual total in the poll.
Stan Musial, also of the Card-
inals, leads in the individual
voting with 1,223,918, while the
White Sox second baseman,
Fox, is second with 1,204,558.
into left field and countered on
Gil McDougald's single.
*G }*"0
TWO OF THE three Boston
safeties against Raschi came in
the fourth, which Johnny Pesky
opened with a single to right.
After Billy Goodman grounded
out, Ted Williams singled in Pes-
ky for the lone Boston counter.
Bob Lemon pitched the Cleve-
land Indians to a 4-1 win over
Detroit despite an abscessed
tooth and an upset stomach,
The tooth was lanced and pack-
ed earlier in the day, but his stom-
ach became upset and he had to
call time out in the sixth inning
after Dick Kryhoski and Hoot
Evers had singled and Aaron Rob-
inson had walked, loading the
bases.
Lemon walked Charlie Keller
after he returned to the mound,
forcing in the Tigers' only score.
After that he was never in ser-
ious trouble in registering his
eighth win against six losses.
Home runs by Gus Zernial and
Eddie Joost provided the Phila-
delphia Athletics with a 3-2 twi:

light victory over Washington in
the first game of a twi-night
doubleheader. Philadelphia won
the second game, 11-5.
The Chicago White Sox clung to
their precious one half game lead
in the American League by wal-
loping the St. Louis Browns, 10-3,
in the first of a four game series.
The White Sox sent 18 batters
to the plate in the first two inn-
ings to score eight runs and rout
pitchers Tommy Byrne and Jim-
my Suchecki.
The Chicago Cubs and the St.
Louis Cardinals played to a 6-6
tie game, the contest being called
at the end of nine innings to per-
mit the Cubs to catch a train for
Cincinnati. The game will be re-
played at a date to be announced
later.
Daily Classifieds
Get Quick Results

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING.
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
FOR SALE
A YEAR'S SUBSCRIPTION to Time
magazine at under 6c an issue. Stu-
dent Periodical Agency, 330 Municipal
Court Bldg., Phone 2-8242. )147
1947 HARLEY-DAVIDSON 45 cu. In. mo-
torcycle. Excellent condition. See it
at Howell's on South U. Call John
Lauer, Univ. Ext. 2198. )146
WOMEN'S GOLF CLUBS - 4 matched
irons, 1 wood. Brand new. Never been
used. $24.95. Ph. 2-8692. )145
Last week
Going Out of Business
GACH CAMERA SHOP
E 400 E. Liberty
Also many non-photographic items
such as office equipment, motors,
lab equipment, etc. )142
TROPICAL FISH GALORE
Call 3-0224
GIRLS RALEIGH BICYCLE-Excellent
condition. 3-speed, hand-brakes, car-
rier, stand, lock, all ready for school.
Ph. 3-0275. )140
FOR RENT
APARTMENT-Complete kitchen, utili-
ties provided. Men preferred, near
campus. Call between 5-7 p.m., 6336.
906 Greenwood. )37F
ROOMS FOR RENT
GIRLS ROOMING HOUSE
Large studio type room. Two closets.
Two beds. Community kitchen. Be-
tween campus & hospitals. Ph. 2-2826.
)81R

ROOM AND BOARD

FOOD FOOD FOOD - Home cooked
meals for men. Excellent food and
coffee. 1319 Hill. )4X
BOARD AT FRATERNITY HOUSE -
Short block from Law Quad, corner
Hill and Oakland. Eating schedule at
your convenience. Really good food.
Ph. 2-1634. )3X
PERSONAL
WANTED - Information regarding the
whereabouts of the Byrle Abbin Cup.
Two Desperate Coeds. Write Box 38,
Michigan Daily. ) 57P
TRANSPORTATION
DRIVERS from Detroit using Plymouth
Rd., join car pool. Call to 7-3904. )36T

111115w
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS Tourist Home. Rooms by Day
or Week, Bath, Shower, Television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )1R
SHARE APARTMENT with Grad Stu-
dent. Save on meals. $8 week. Big
yard, continuous hot water. Call
31791. )80R
WASHTENAW AREA - Pleasant single
room with private lavatory and toilet.
Gentlemen preferred. 2-3868. )77R

en cr cio Lut
Remember
to 1En joy
PAUL THOMPKINS
playing your requests
on the Organ
. ..at . .
375 Jackson Road
2=o U <=:o<ete'j=><=:o<=o<o=-->,r--,O

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. We spe-
cialize in doing summer dresses.
MEN TO EAT at fraternity house, break-
fast, lunch and dinner, or any com-
bination. Two blocks from East Quad.
Phone 2-8312. 1319 Cambridge. )298
MISCELLANEOUS
AT LIBERTY-German 11 and 12 in-
structor does tutoring and translation.
A. R. Neumann, 2-7909.
MEALS 50e up
Breakfast. . .,7:00-10:00
Lunch. ..... 3 1:00-1 :30 c
Dinner......5:00-7:00
MEAL MART
CAFETERIA
338 Maynard, Thru the Arcade
o

Daily Classifieds
Get Quick Results

E

Subscribe, to

the.

PENN STILL REBELLIOUS:
Justice Department to Probe Grid TV

Summer

Continuous
Daily from 1 P.M.
IT*--E
Last Times Today!
Id1 I
II!
STARTS SUNDAY!
EXOTING AS AN ARABIAN
NIGII hADVENTURE!
TONY CURTIS
PIPR LAURIE
and ith*
1 D AWING SLAVE GIR19

PHILADELPHIA--MP)-The Jus-
tice Department yesterday told
the University of Pennsylvania it
has ordered a sweeping investiga-
tion of televising college football
games.
At the same time, a department
spokesman made it clear that the
government has not approved the
National Collegiate Athletic As-
sociation plan of limiting foot-
ball TV.
THE FUNDAMENTAL issue is
whether or not the NCAA pro-
gram is legal or whether it vio-
lates federal anti-trust laws.
Francis T. Murray, Penn's
athletic director, made public
the text of a letter to him from

H. G. Morison, Assistant Attor-
ney General, in which Morison
asserted that the Justice De-
partment has not "either form-
ally or informally approved the
NCAA's television moratorium."
It was the latest move in the
long-simmering feud between Penn
and the NCAA over the question
of televising games next fall.
THE NCAA at Dallas last Jan.
12 voted 161 to 7 to declare a
moratorium on telecasts of col-
lege football games, stating that
it wanted to test the effect of TV
on attendance and gate receipts.
It announced it would permit
only a limited number of games
to be televised with 60 per cent

of the
NCAA's
cent to
tions.

proceeds going
TV fund and
the competing

.r.r--- -11

Late Shove
TONIGHT
1 1 P. M.

A E
A ERY SPECIAc

to the
40 per
institu-

Penn balked, declaring the
NCAA position was illegal. The
university announced it would
defy the NCAA and telecast its
eight home games despite the
edict.
The NCAA retaliated by de-
claring Penn was "not in good
standing" in the NCAA.
MURRAY said he wrote Mor-
son asking for the department's
position. He made public Mori-
son's reply in which the govern-
ment official quoted a letter he
sent on June 20 to Joseph L.
Rauh, Jr., counsel for the NCAA.
In Washington, Max Farrington
of George Washington University
said the exchange of correspon-
dence will "have no effect" on the
NCAA plans.' Farrington helped
draw up the NCAA TV program.
Farrington told a reporter "we
have been proceeding on the
grounds that we're legal until told
otherwise. We've had no opinion
from the Department of Justice
because you don't get one until
there's a case."
The NCAA television committee
is scheduled to meet in Chicago
July 6 and 7 to discuss contracts.
FROZEN CUSTARD
Largest Root Beer
in town in frosted mugs
On Liberty-100 ft. from
the theater.
Liberty Custard Shop

MICH lGAN

DAILY

Associated Press Wire News
Sports, Campus & National
Columnists, Campus & Syndicated
Daily University Official Bulletin
Complete Campus News Coverage

ALFRED HITCHCOC K
EVENTI!
A HUNDRED
AND ONE
BREATHLESS
MINUTES OF MATCHLESS SUSPENSE!
iram ir

Farley
GRANGER
Ruth
ROMAN
Robert
WALKER

4

I

11

1.75
Available from Campus Salesmen

L. G. BALFOUR CO.
0r- A -r-r-A K 1i--\/ ir-\ A /r- n\/i

I

I

i

1'

B

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan