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August 11, 1951 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1951-08-11

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SATURDAY, AUGUST, 11, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THIEE

Yanlees, Indians Both

whin, Remain

Ted

inAL

Mize's Bat Beats Athletics;
Lemon Takes 6th Straight

* * *

Demaret's 136
Leads World Golf

SECOND ATTEMPT:
Mann To Take Natators to England

t $ #

By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA Clutch hit-
ting Johnny Mize drove in two
runs and smashed his tenth home
run of the season lastnight to
give the New York Yankees a 3
to 1 victory over the Philadelphia
Athletics before 17,204 at Shibe
Park.
The victory enabled the pen-
nant-embattled Yankees to main-
tain their first place tie with the
Cleveland Indians who came from
behind to take a 6-4 win over Chi-
cago.
* * *
LEFTY ED LOPAT, master of
the slow curves, chalked up his
15th win of the campaign against
six defeats as he limited the sev-
enth place Philadelphians to six
hits, struck out eight and walked
only three. The stocky sidewin-
,er weakened momentarily in
the sixth when the A's scored their
only run on a center field double
by Allie Clark and a single off the
bat of Gus Zerial.
Sam Zoldak, though touched
for 12 hits, pitched good ball.
His big troubles were the old
pro, Mize, and the Yankee can-
didate for rookie of the year
honors in the junior circuit, Gil
McDougald. Young McDougald
collected three hits, including a
booming triple in the third that'
eventually became the first New
York run.
Al Rosen hit a two run homer
in the seventh inning to give the
Cleveland Indians a 6-4 victory
over the Chicago White Sox and
keep them in a first-place tie with
the New York Yankees.
s* *
BOTH CLEVELAND and New
York have won 67 and lost 39
games. The Yankees trounced
the Philadelphia Athletics, 3-1.
The Indians' victory was their
eighth straight, one short of
their record for the season.
Bob Lemon went the route for
Cleveland, allowing seven hits in
winning his 13th victory against
nine losses. The husky right-
Baseball's
Big Six S
By The Associated Press
Leading Batsmen (based on 250
times at bat).
Player and Club G AB R H Pet.
Musial, Cards 103 381 82 142 .373
Ashburn, Phils 108 452 72 159 .352
Minoso, W. Sox 105 383 88 132 .34
Robinson, Ddg. 104 369 74 127 .344
Kell, Tigers 98 398 63 133 .334
Fain, Athletics 82 293 37 98 .334
RUNS BATTED IN
American League
Williams, Red Sox............... 96
Robinson, White Sox ............ 89
Zernal, Athletics.............. 86
National League
Irvin, Giants .................... 83
Kiner, Pirates .................... 81
Musial, Cardinals ................ 76
Snider, Dodgers .................. 76
HOME RUNS
American League
Zernial, Athletics ................ 24
Williams, Red Sox ................ 23
Robinson, White Sox ............ 20
National League
Hodges, Dodgers ................. 32
Kiner, Pirates .................... 31
Musial, Cardinals ................ 25

hander now has five straight vic-
tories.
KEN HOLCOMBE, who gave up
10 of the Tribe's 12 hits was
charged with the loss, his eighth
against as many wins. He was
relieved by Randy Gumpert in the
seventh when the Tribe came from
behind to push over four runs.
The Indians, after trailing 4-
2, pushed over four runs on two
singles, a double, Rosen's hom-
er and an error in their seventh
inning rally that started with
tow men out.
That sent Holcombe to the
showers and Gumpert relieved
him.
THE SOX got off to a two run
lead in the first inning when
Nelson Fox walked and Orestes
Minoso, Eddie Robinson and Ray
Coleman singled in order.
They pushed the lead to 4-0
in the fifth, Ed Stewart drawing
a walk and former Tribesman
Minoso poling his ninth homer
of the season.
The Indians struck pay dirt for
th efirst time in their half of the
fifth, pushing over two runs on
four straight singles.
* * *
BOSTON'S RED SOX scored
three runs after two were out in
the sixth inning to go ahead 5-4
and wound up with a 6-4 triumph
over the Washington Senators.
Clyde Vollmer added his 20th
home run of the season in the
eighth to provide the Sox with an
insurance run. A 28,937 Fenway
Park crowd saw Ellis Kiner pitch
hitless bal lover the last three in-
nings to preserve Mel Parnell's
12th victory.
The victory, second in succes-
sion after five losses in a row,
kept the Sox within four and a
half games of the first place
New York Yankees an dCleve-
land Indians.
Boston got of fto a 2-0 lead in
the third, but the Senators scored
al ltheir runs in the fifth to go
ahead 4-2.
Three o fthe tallies scored on
Mickey Vernon's ninth homer of
the season, pulled into the seats
in right.
SURVIVING a shaky start Mel
Queen posted his first shutout in
the National League as the Pitts-
burgh Pirates edged the Chicago
Cubs 3 to 0 before 7,703.
Tagged forfour hits in the
first three innings, Queen limit-
ed the Cubs to two hits and a
walk the rest of the way to post
his fourth victory against seven
defeats. Five of his 13 wins in
the circuit have been at the ex-
pense of the Cubs.
Cal McLish had tamed the Pi-
rates without a hit until two were
out in the seventh inning. Then
Ralph Kiner slammed a liner to
left center field that Frankie
Baumholtz misjudged into a dou-
ble.
Moments later Bill Howerton
rapped a clea nsingle over short
to score Kiner with what proved
to be the winning run.
The Bucs needed only one hit to
insure their victory with two
Righthander Ned Garver's pitch-
ing and battinb spoiled the De-
troit Tigers' debut under their new
general manager Charlie Gehring-
er, the St. Louis Browns whipping
the Tigers 4 to 2.
Garver, aided by Cliff Mapes'
home run with no one on base in
the sixth inning, won his 14th
game against six losses for the
last-place Brownies.
Garver smacked a double and
three singles himself and gave up
seven hits in scoring his third 1951
victory over the Tigers. They
haven't beaten him this year.
Pitcher Gerald Staley drove in
the winning run with a two-out,
bass-loaded single in the last of

the tenth inning to give the St.
Louis Cardinals a 4-3 victory over
the Cincinnati Reds before 7,571
fans.

JOHN MIZE
... big bat booms

Cadets Count
On Freshmen
WEST POINT, N.Y.-(O-Only
ends Ed Weaver and John Krobeck
remain of a dismissal-ridden Army
football squad, as Coach Red Blaik
released a tentative player roster
for the 1951 season.
Blaik hopes to fill the numerous
gaps in his team with recruits
from the plebe squad and reserve
team. Nineteen graduates of the
plebe squad are listed on the 31-
man roster.
The Cadets, with their usual
schedule of topflight college teams,
hope to use freshmen under the
Eastern Collegiate Association
rules. But Academy spokesmen
were doubtful as to whether fresh-
men would be allowed to play,
since they carry a heavy work
load..
THE SPORTS TRAIL:

CHICAGO-G)-Nine first-rate
pros, led by Jimmy Demaret with
a 36-hole total of eight-under-par
136, remained separated by only
two strokes yesterday in a blanket
race for the $12,500 first prize in
the Tam O'Shanter "World" Golf
Championship.
While lesser lights in the field of
74 players who participated in the
first round par-wrecking frolic yes-
terday faded at the halfway mark,
Demaret kept his stride by coupl-
ing 69 with an opening 67 over
the standard 36-36-72 route.
* * * *
GROUPED at 137 were two of
the game's toughest competitors,
Ben Hogan and Clayton Heafner.
Six more were piled into the
138 bracket - Johnny Palmer,
who defeated Demaret in a play-
off for the 1949 "world" title;
Bob Hamilton, the 1944 National
PGA king; Al Brosch, whose 60
in the Texas Open stands as a
PGA record round; Lawson Lit-
tIe, kink-armed Ed Furgol and
Herman Barron.
Heafner and Palmer pounded
on the pace with 68's, low rounds
of the day. Hogan, Hamilton, Bar-
ron and Furgol shot 69's. Little
had 70 and Brosch a 71.
* * *
OUT OF 46 who bettered par
yesterday, 31 remained under par
through 36 holes.
Betsy Rawls, 23-year-old pro-
fessional from Austin, Tex., who
was a Phi Beta Kappa physics
major at the University of Tex-
as, headed the Women's "World"

I

I , . ...__ !

tournament with par 76 for a
midway card of 147-five under
regulation.
Two strokes behind at 149 in
the pace for the $2,100 top award
came Patty Berg with a, second
round of 75. Babe Zaharias, the
defending champion, ballooned to
79 for 151 and third in the field
of 20.
Thirty-six hole leaders in the
world championship of golf:
(Par 72-72-144)
(X--denotes amateurs)
Jimmy Demaret, Ojai, Calif.,
67-69-136
Ben Hogan, Fort Worth, Tex.,
67-68-137
Clayton Heafner, Charlotte, N.C.,
69-68-137
Al Brosch, Garden City, N.Y.,
67-71-138
Ed Furgol, Royal Oak, Mich.,
69-69-138
Herman Barron, White Plains,
N.Y., 69-69-138
Lawson Little, Pebble Beach,
Calif., 68-70-138
Bob Hamilton, Evansville, Ind.,
69-69-138
Johnny Palmer, . Badin, N.C.,
70-68-138
Glenn Teal, Knoxville, Tenn.,
68-71-139
Ted Kroll, New Hartford, N.Y.,
67-73-140
Pete Cooper, White Plains, N.Y.,
69-71-140
X-Frank Stranahan, Toledo, O.,
69-71-140
Shelley Mayfield, Cedarhurst,
N.Y., 70-70-140
Sam Snead, White Sulpuhr
Springs, W. Va., 69-71-140
Springs, W. Va., 69-71-140
Earl Stewart, Jr., Dallas, Tex.,
68-72-140
Ray Gafford, Dallas, Tex., 67-74
-141
Jack Shields, Gleneagles, Ill.,
70-71-141
Norman Von Nida, Sydney, Aus-
tralia, 69-72--141
Lloyd Mangrum, Chicago, 70-72
--142
Cary Middlecoff, Memphis, Tenn.
68-74-142
Skee Riegel, Tulsa, Okla., 71-71.
-142
E. J. Harrison, St. Andrews, Ill.,
68-74-142
Jack Burke, Houston, Tex., 71-71
-142
Walt Burkemo, Franklin, Mich.,
70-72-142
Major League
Standings

By GEORGE FLINT
Daily Sports Editor
Thirteen of the proteges of Matt
Mann, the tireless Michigan swim-
ming coach, will head for Merrie
England later this month for a
tour which has been in germina-
tion for twelve years.
Back in 1939. the genial Wolver-
ine mentor had planned a simi-
lar trip to the haunts of King
Arthur. The date set for the de-
parture fell on a Monday. The
preceding Friday, a fanatic nam-
ed Adolph Hitler marched the
German army into Poland, and
European visits became as popular
as Dean Acheson in Tribuneland.
SO THE TRIP Mann and his
men take this August (they leave
on the 18th) fulfills a long-felt
hope.
Making the jaunt along with
Matt and Mrs. Mann will be
four Michigan swim captains,-
Dave Neisch, Matt Mann III,
and 1952 co-captains John Da-
vies and Stew Elliott. Davies, the
slim breaststroker from Austra-
lia, recently won both the 100
and 200 meter races at the out-
door AAU championships in De-
troit.
Mann's son, captain of the 1950
team, is at present coach of the
University High School swim
squad.
In addition to the quartet of
captains, Alex Canja, one of the

carry the Maize and Blue colors.
In addition, Bill Schuelle, a pro-
mising tankman from U High,
will accompany the squad.

The tour will consist mostly of
exhibitions, though in some towns
topflight British stars will furnisW
competition.
THE GROUP leaves on the
Mauretania, one of the Cunard
liners. Coach Mann will fly over
and meet the group at Brighton.
In Britain, the Wolverine ath-
letes are sponsored by the Shiv-
erers' Club of Hove, Sussex, who
have made all arrangements for
the tour. Although each man
pays his own way on the trip,
discounts on food, living quar-
ters, and transportation have
been arranged by the club
For Mann, it will be a return
home. He last visited his native
England in 1946. Living there un-
til he reached his late teens, the
elder Mann was once British em-
pire champ in the sprints.
The team will travel in attire
similar to that of the United
States Olympic team, wearing blue
jackets and gray flannel trougers,
along with white buckskin shoes.
The squad returns home on the
21st of September, this time on
the Queen Elizabeth. Coach Mann
will remain in London to conducts
a four-day clinic for British Olym-
pic aspirants and some of the
younger British coaches.

MATT MANN
... homecoming trip
best divers developed here during
the last decade, will handle the
springboard duties in the twelve-
town tour.
From the past season's varsity
and freshman squad, distance-
men Wally Jeffries, Burwell
(Bumpy) Jones, and Colombian
Olympic ace Luis Child; sprint-
ers Don Hill and Bob Brenner;
backstroker Bernie Kahn; and
medley men Rusty Carlisle will

SAYE TIME ; °s 4 NDMO

3 .

Blaik's Decision Called
Courageous by Martin

By WHITNEY MARTIN
NEW YORK - (P) - A man of
lesser stature would have quit
cold.I
Red Blaik could have done the
same thing without censure. He
could have stepped out of the
West Point picture into the com-
forting santuary of oblivion inso-
far as the public is concerned, and
his act would have been greeted
only with sympathy and under-
standing.
HERE IS A man, proud and
high spirited, riding the crest of
success in his profession, his past
as football coach blanketed in
glory, the present and the future
giving no hint that the serenity
of his life would be disturbed.
Suddenly all is chaos. Like a
stout building collapsing sud-
denly from hidden erosion of its
foundation, only wreckage re-
mains of the little gridiron em-
pire he had so effectively and
patiently constructed.
Swept away by one crushing
blow was the tranquility of his
life. His football team virtually
wiped out by the cribbing admis-
sions, his own son, a fine youth,
among those involved, his cher-
ished reputation periled by defeats
which are bound to come, his ex-
istence in one tragic moment be-
came a horrible nightmare.
IF HE WAS tempted to chuck
it all and retreat to obscurity he
could not be blamed. To face the
bleak immediate future at West
Point took real moral courage. To
back his athletes, without condon-
ing their actions, brought out the
champion in him.
We carry so many mental
images of the man as we have
known him in the past few
years. Memories of him in vic-
tory and in defeat, when the
outlook wasidismal and when
it glowed with promise.
The picture of him seated at
ease in his office, discussing
blandly the prospects for a coin-
ing season, neither painting a too
glowing outlook nor belittling the

C

AMERICAN7
Wv
New York ... 67
Cleveland ..67
Boston........63
Chicago ..... 60
Detroit........49
Washington . 46
Philadelphia 41
St. Louis .... 34
YESTERDAY'S

LEAGUE
L Pct.
39 .632
39 .632
44 .589
48 .556
56 .467
60 .434
68 .376
73 .318
RESULTS

GB
4P
8
171!
21
27?
331/

- _.

t

T
STARTS TODAY

t

EARL (RED) BLAIK
« . integrity unlimited
* ** * ,
abilities of the young men he was
teaching. le took a firm middle
ground as, in a precise, analytical
way, he weighed assets against
liabilities.
Austere and aloof he might seem
to those who have occasion only
to note his regal bearing, but he
is a warm, sensitive man with
more than a little shyness about
him.
And there is the picture of him
as he marched resolutely accxss
the field to congratulate Lou Lit-
tle of Columbia after the iL;ons
had snapped Ai ny's prolonged
winning streak. Ile was alone in
a multitude, unperturbed by the
jostling of the ecstatic Columbia
fans.
There are the many pictures of
him in triumph, for triumph had
become integrated w i t h Army
football. In victory, as in defeat,
he always has been the same gra-
cious gentleman.

Cleveland 6, Chicago 4.
New York 3, Philadelphia 1.
Boston 6, Washington 4.
St. Louis 4, Detroit 2.
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Cleveland (N)-Dobson
(7-3) vs. Wynn (11-11).
New York at Philadelphia-Rey-
nolds (12-6) vs. Fowler (4-8).
Washington at Boston - Johnson
(6-7) vs. Stobbs (8-4).
St. Louis at Detroit-Widmar (4-9)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
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Figure 5 average words to a line,
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
FOR SALE
,BRITISH MADE BIKE with 3-speeds,
lock, bell, wire basket, chain guard.
Call Colton,.320 Michigan House. )178
TIME $3 . . LIFE $4 . . FORTUNE $7.50.
MAG. OF BLDG. $5.50. Student Peri-
odical, 330 Municipal Ct. Bldg. Phone
2-8242. )179
CRAZY PRICES
Men's Seersucker and Plaid Pants 2.00
j Navy "'T" Shirts 39c
Swun Trunks 1.66
Hanes. "T "Shirts 89c
Open 'til 6 P.M.
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington )177
FLOURESCENT LAMP in top shape.
Sells for $27 new. Will sell for $17.
Call 8178. )176
PARAKEETS, Canaries, and Finches-
New and used cages. 562 So. Seventh,
Phone 5330. )164
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOR MEN-Spacious, double, in beau-
tiful home. Shown before noon or
after 4 PM., 1430 Cambridge. )84R
Monday
* ° Saturday
44c to 5 P.M.
Continuous
Daily from 1 P.M.
Lost Times Today
Starts Sunday
. ~ ~ T3hehmU---~ 3 33

ROOMS FOR RENT

MISCELLANEOUS

vs. Trout (6-12).
NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn .... 69
New York ...,59
Philadelphia 56
St. Louis ,... 50
Boston........49
Cincinnati .. 49
Chicago .. 45
Pittsburgh .. 43
YESTERDAY'S

LEAGUE
L Pct.
35 .663
50 .541
52 .519
52 .490
54 .476
57 .462
57 .441
63 .406
S RESULTS

GB
12"?
15
18
1912
21
23
27

L. G. BALFOURI CO.
FRATERNITY JEWELRY
CUPS AND TROPHIES
00
Q MICHIGAN SOUVENIRS. .
GIFTS
SUMMER STORE HOURS - 12:30 till 5:00
Closed Saturdays
'Home of the official Michigan Rings.
od < >oo

RETURN TO SCHOOL in the fall and
find your favorite magazine waiting
for you. Sounds fine, doesn't it?
Merely phone 2-8242 to place your
order. )18M
BUSINESS SERVICES
CARETAKER-Lawyer (27) studying for
Mich Bar, willing to act as caretaker
through middle of Sept. References,
Box 175, Michigan Daily. )43B
WASHING, finished work. p~nd hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. We spe-
cialize in doing summer dresses.
Read Daily Classifieds

MALE STUDENTS
VERY GOOD suite for 3, with porch.
1 double, 2 singles for fall and spring
semesters. Close to hospitals, adjacent
to campus. Phone 6466. )85R
FOR RENT
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME now offers
an apartment finding service free to
their guests. 100% results to date.
Over 30 apt's. available. Try us. 518
E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )41F
ROOM AND BOARD
FOR RENT FOR BOYS-Rooms with or
without weekly board. Also two rooms
and kitchen and one room and kit-
chen. Call 2-8269. )5X

TYPING WANTED-To do in my home.
Experienced. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
)40B
HELP WANTED
PSYCHOLOGY TESTS
Would sincerely appreciate the help
of 25 male university students (any
class) for two hours as volunteers,
for my dissertation experiment. One
hour will be on Monday, August 13th
and one hour on Tuesday, August
14th at 7:15 p.m. in the Natural Sci-
ence Building. If interested, please
call AA 2-6740 for room number.c
Jack Martire )64H
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED--Ride to Salt Lake City, Utah
on August 30, back in time for schoo
Phone 2-7961. )447
GRAD STUDENT and wife desire ride
to N.Y.C. Aug. 17-18. Share driving
and expense. Phone Bob Frese 2-1264.
)41T
WANTED-Ride to Mass. Aug. 20. Call
Cal at 2-3297. )43T
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Man's Elgin wrist watch, initials
"W.F.M." Reward. Ph. 8602. )106L
PERSONAL
GRADUATE GIFT SHOPPING? Save
money, time, trouble and perspira-
tion by giving him a subscription at
student rates. Phone 2-8242. )68P

BUSINESS SERVICES

Pittsburgh 3, Chicago 0.
Philadelphia at New York, post-
poned, rain.
Boston at Brooklyn postponed, rain.
St. Louis 4, Cincinnati 3.
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at New York -.Meyer
(8-9) vs. Koslo (6-9).
Boston at Brooklyn-Surkont (8-9)
vs. Podbielan (1-2) or Palica (2-4).
Pittsburgh at Chicago (2)-Law (3-
7) and Friend (4-8) vs. Rush (7-6)
and Kelly (2-1).
Cncinnati at St. Louis (N)-Perow-
ski (3-5) vs. Lanier (5-8).

J I
'coca roan
MomomuI
)cTa~

UM

EWA

starrintgnw t
IfttIE POWELL sog
ED~11CO E

S. L. Cinema Guild
Presents
Alfred Hitchcock's
ifeboat"

II-IVE",

I

TONIGHT
The Sun Downers

- FOR
6 y SECURITY
Carry
TRAVELER'S
CHECKS

i JOHN BARRYMORE, Jr.

I

ROBERT PRESTON
DARK CITY

.

I

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I

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I *.N -.P ...,.. ."..' '..'...' '-..-".-,,.'.. '.'. -j PI I

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