100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 11, 1951 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE FOUR

.'TT5.U T 'CLkIV A V I" I~T V

MATiTRDAY_ AUGUST 11. 1951

1TAi l 1111. 111T.r A 11T r7A TiL

'DATfnAVX ntiax 'r 11 1OjI

RABIES VACCINE?
U' Doctors See Danger
In Polio Immunity Test
By RON GOLDSTEIN
A plan of a Waco, Texas, doctor to give rabies shots for immunity
to infantile paralysis was called dangerous by several University doc-
ytors,yesterday.
The plan, which will begin Monday, is part of a program of Dr.
Herbert E. Hipps who is checking something he thinks he may have
discovered after years of investigation and keeping records: Persons
who have received rabies shots haven't had polio.
"I HAVE COLLECTED over 700 names of children who have been
vaccinated for rabies and not a single one has ever taken polio, even
though many of them were directly exposed to it by close association
" with other children who did have
acute polio," said the Texas doc-
Senate OK's tor.

Crime Group's
TV Hearings
WASHINGTON - RP) -- The
Senate gave a virtual vote of con-
fidence yesterday to its Crime
Committee's practice of televising
some of its major hearings.
It refused by a roll call vote of
38 to 13 to withdraw Contempt of
Congress charges against two wit-
nesses who said they would not
testify while television, radio and
newsreel were operating.
s. * a
ACCUSING THE Crime Com-
inittee of running wild and put-
ting on "headline hunting" spec-
tacles and extravaganzas, Senator
Cain (R-Wash.) had asked the
Senate to reconsider contempt ci
tations voted March 30 against
Morris Kleinman and Louis Roth-
kopf of Cleveland.
Kleinman and Rothkopf were
linked by the crime investigators
with a big interstate gambling
syndicate. Their refusal to testify
occurred March 26.
Yesterday's vote cleared the way
for the contempt citations to be
sent to the U.S. Attorney here for
presentation to a grand jury. The
penalty on conviction for con-'
tempt is up to one year in jail and
a $1,000 fine.
Cataline Gets
New Position
Prof. Elmon L. Cataline resigned
from his teaching post in the.
pharmacy college yesterday in or-
der to accept an appointment as
dean of the College of Pharmacy
at the University of New Mexico.
Prof. Cat anne graduated from
the University in 1934 and re-
ceived a doctorate here in 1937.
He taught at the University of
Toledo for three years and then
came back to Ann Arbor in 1940
to take up his teaching position.
A member of various honor so-
cieties,. he was a University Scho-
lar in 1934-35, and has published1
several" technical articles.,
He said that he expected to
leave Ann Arbor about Aug. 25 for
Albuquerque, N. M., where he'll1
assume his new duties on Sept. 1.4

Although a few University
doctors stated that such a the-
ory might work, it was the gen-
eral opinion that there would
be a small but definite amount
of danger attached to it.
Commenting on a recent news-
paper article, Dr. Thomas Francis,
chairman of the department of
epidemiology, said, "In some re-
spects the injection of rabies can
prove more dangerous than that
of polio itself."
In reference to Dr. Hipps' sta-
tistics, Dr. James L. Wilson, chair-
man of the University department
of pediatrics and communicable
diseases, said, "Seven hundred
children or more who have had a
box of peanuts and then been ex-
posed to polio might not get the
disease, for even in an epidemic
sometimes only one person'out of
5000 gets it."
U' Officials
Poll Students
Recent circulation of a ques-
tionnaire among students in six
and eight-week courses does not
indicate that the University is
considering giving up its present
Summer Session academic system,
an administration official said
yesterday.
"We are merely seeking infor-
mation to aid us ip meeting the
needs of students enrolled during
the summer," Prof. George M. Mc-
Ewen, Summer Session secretary,
asserted.
The purpose of the survey is to
determine the demand for six-
week courses, he said. However,
he emphasized that "there has
been no thought that the eight-
week program will be given up."
Sixteen classes, including both
six-week and eight-week courses,
were asked to fill out the question-
naires. The survey sought factors
which determined choice of the
courses.
Trade Executives
Will Meet Here-
T he business administration
school will play host to represen-
tatives of major Michigan trade
associations Sept. 12.
About thirty trade association
executives from Lansing and De-
troit are expected to attend the
one-day session

Raft Crew
To Get Tow
DownOhio
NEW MARTINSVILLE, W. Va.
--W)-Life along .the Ohio River
was smooth sailing yesterday for
skipper Mary Ellin McCrady,
Grad., and the crew of her co-
educational raft expedition to New
Orleans.
A member of this city's boat
club said that arrangements had
been made for pleasure craft to
tow the "Lethargia" as far as
Parkersburg, W. Va., about 80
miles south of New Martinsville.
After that, he said, "they may run
out of rides."
* * *
THE RAFT WAS towed with its
two bachelors and two unmarried
women to Paden City, W. Va.,
night before last, and they were
left tied up "Tom Sawyer" fashion
at a small uninhabitated island
just outside the town.
A lock tender said the rafters
.were due for some night life, be-
cause P a d e n City residents
planned a "celebration for them."
Their smooth going is expect-
to continue today when another
boat is going to take over on
the "river-lift" organized to
tow the voyagers.
Smooth sailing of this kind has
been an exception for Skipper Mc-
Crady and crew, Gerry Garcia,
Milt Borden, Grad., and Don
Brown, '51. Two weeks ago they
had to swim for their lives, and
since then they have had to con-
tend with lack of currents and
tail winds.
Miss McCrady still has plans to
write a sociology thesis about the
trip.

I

I1

F

I
I
I
.

Ews

4

'TAKE IT AWAY, PLEAS E ' -Birmingham, Ala.,
highway police discuss dismantling of this house during removal to
another site. When told it would block highway, police relented.

l
1

N Q 5 E T 0 T H E G R I N D S T 0 N E -Passenger of winning team perches perilously close
to ground during sidecar event of international motorcycle races at Schottenring, Germany.

4

I

WCTU Hits
Booze .Bouts
The Woman's Christian Tem-
perance Union has initiated a
campaign to keep liquor and nar-
cotics out of college life, according
to a story in the New York Times
yesterday.
Delegates at the annual conven-
tion adopted a recommendation
of their president to attempt to
eliminate student drinking and
drug-taking by "seeing to it that
clean and wholesome recreational
facilities are available."
She said that they should en-
courage fireside Bible reading as
a substitute for "booze bouts."
Lashing out at parent tipplers, she
added that 50 per cent of future
drinkers grow up in homes where
parents set a drinking example.
Norton Accepts
Post at Clark U.
Prof. Roger C. Norton of the
German department has accepted
a teaching post at Clark Univer-
sity, Worcester, Mass.
A graduate of the University
and veteran of World War II,
Prof. Norton has taught here for
the last two years.

F A W N S A T F 0 0 D-Ann Peiffer and David Anderson
watch bottle-fed orphan fawns at Williamsport, Pa.-Animals are
cared for by Game Commission until, old enough for release.

HOUSING . OOM IN PUERTO RICO - Barometer of economic boom in Puerto
ico is construction industry which helped produce this giant home project at Puerto Nuevo.

F

B

1

k.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Subject--"Spirit."
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
Ths room is open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Fridays 7-9
P. M., Saturday 3-5 P.M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
504 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
Crystal Cuthbert, Assistant Student Counselor
Sunday School: Guild Class 10:00.
Service, 11:00: Rev. Loucks "The Meaning of
Suffering."
Roger Williams Guild: Supper 6:00. Discussion,
"The Great Alternative," final chapter. 7:00.
The Guild House, 502 E. Huron.

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETINGLane Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister .
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning service.
7:00 P.M.: Sunday evening service.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahr,
Eugene Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Breakfast Seminar, Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship, "I Believe in Prayer -
Therefore" Dr. Large, preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P:M.: Worship and program. The out-
standing Protestant Film Commission movie,
"Beyond Our Own" will be shown.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily
until August 18th.

4c

B E A T I N G T O W I N D W A R D - Heeled over and winging, International One-Design
craft make. a trail of sails in a northwester during Race Week of Larchmont, N. Y., Yacht Club.

READY FOR H I S CUT-John J. McCloy, U. S. High
Commissioner in Germany, hefts a bat before going to plate during
softball game in Frankfurt Military Post League. The Commish,
after choosing a good wood, made two hits, one with bases loaded.

.A,

A

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
Rev. Willard V. Lampe from Terre Haute, Indiana,
sermon "Surrendered Standards,"'

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
Alfred T..Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor. "Rekindling the Fire of Faith."
Sunday at 5:30: GAMMA DELTA, LUTHERAN

4 i ?K .. .. w~wwj yo~tl K u . y ' Yt :

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan