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August 05, 1951 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1951-08-05

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAOE THRER

SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 1951 fAGE TH1~EK

Yanks

Retai: AL Lead,

but Tribe's on

War ath

Feller Garners 17th Win;
Groth's Homer Beats Bosox

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - The New York
Yankees remained a half game
ahead in the grueling American
League pennant scramble yester-
day, trouncing the last place St.
Louis Browns, 11-3, while the
Cleveland Indians broke their sec-
ond place tie with the Boston Red
Sox.
Bob Feller, with help from Lou
Brissie, pitched the Indians to a
4-2 victory over the Philadelphia
Athletics. The victory was Fel-
ler's 17th, highest in the majors.
The Red Sox dropped a 2-1 deci-
sion to the Detroit Tigers and
dropped into third place, 1 /2
games back of the Yanks. Johnny
Groth won the game for the Tig-
ers with a two-run homer in the
ninth.
IN NATIONAL' League day
games the Cincinnati Reds hum-
bled the league-leading Brooklyn
Dodgers, 7-3, the Pittsburgh Pir-
ates defeated the Philadelphia
Phils, 7-3, and the Chicago Cubs
nipped the Boston Braves, 7-6, in
11 innings.
The Browns and Yanks were
locked in a 1-1 tie until the sixth
inning when the Yanks broke
the game wide open with a six-
run rally. Two runs scored on
delayed throws to the plate, Yogi
Berra knocked home the three
with a bases-loaded double and
another counted with the aid of
an error.
Joe Collins clouted a two-run
homer for the Yanks in the sev-
enth and the Bombers added a
pair in the eighth on a homer by
Berra and Triple steal.
** *
LEFTY BOB KUZAVA went the
distance for the Yanks and per-
** xitted six hits, half of them extra
base blows. The victory was Ku-,
lava's seventh and his fifth since
coming to the Yanks from Wash-
ington. Jim Suchecki started and
65c
ALL DAY
ID TODAY!
Continuous
Daily from 1 P.M.
STARTS TODAY

was charged with his sixth loss
without a victory for the Browns.
Rookie Leo Kiely had the Tig-
ers blanked on three hits going
into the ninth. Steve Souchock
opened the inning with a single
and Groth followed with his
second home run of the season
to win the game.
Walt Dropo accounted for the
Red Sox run with a home run in
the sixth inning off Fred Hutch-
inson.
IIUTCHINSON was relieved in
the eighth by Hank Borowy, who
gained credit for his first victory.
Ted Gray hurled the ninth for the
Tigers and struck out pinch-hitter
Charlie Maxwell, Dom DiMaggio
and Johnny Pesky in order.
Feller and the A's Dick Fowler
were hooked up in a 2-2 tie un-
til the eighth inning when Larry
Doby tripled with two on and
two out to give the Indians the
edge. A double by Dale Mitchell
--his third hit-and walk to Bob
Avila preceded Doby's blast off
the right field wall.
Feller weakened in the ninth
and Brissie took over with two on
and two out, fanning former team-
mate Elmer Valo to end the game.!
* * *

Flam, Seixas
Win for U.S.
In CupPlay
Yanks Advane
To Zone Finals
RYE, N.Y.-()P)-Herbie Flam of
Los Angeles and Vic Seixas of Phi-
ladelphia, a patched-up doubles
team playing together for the
first time, crushed Mexico's Davis
Cup hopes in 49 bristling minutes
yesterday and sent the United
States into the final round of the
American Zone tennis competition.
The youthful American tandem
swept over Mexico's veteran inter-
national brother combination, Ro-
lando and Armando Vega, 6-4, 6-2,
6-0, at the Westchester Country
Club to give the United States a
3-0 lead in the series.
* * *
UNCLE SAM'S forces thus qua-
lified to meet the winner of the
semi-final matches between Cana-
da and Cuba, now in progress at
Montreal.
They are favored to carry their
comeback campaign against
Sweden, the European champ-
ion, and then against Australia,
which seized the famous trophy
from our show case last sum-
mer.
The triumph-achieved before a
crowd of 400 in cool, clear weath-
er-made a formality of today's fi-
nal two singles engagements.
Flam will meet Armando Vega
in the opening match at 2 p.m.
(E.S.T.) and Seixas, subbing for
national champion Art Larsen,
will take on Mario Llamas, the
champion of Mexica, in the after-
piece.
Seixas, a tall youngster with a
lot of stroking power, and Flam,
a tiny go-getter, blended perfect-
ly yesterday to outclass a Mexican
tandem that was expected to give
plenty of trouble.

II

New Yi
Clevela
Boston
Chicag
Detroit
Washin
Philad
St. Lo

Major League Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE,
W L Pct. GB W 'L Pot.
ark .... 62 38 .620 .. Brooklyn .... 64 35 .646
nd .... 62 39 .614 U New York .... 58 47 .552
. . 61 40 .604 11 Philadelphia 51 51 .500
;o...... 57 46 .556 61 St. Louis...... 47 50 .485
t.......46 52 .469 15 Boston....... 46 51 .474
gton .. 45 56 .443 17% Cincinnati .. 47 52 .475
elphia 39 64 .379 24 Chicago 43 52 .453
uis .... 32 69 .317 301 Pittsburgh 41 59 .410
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS YsTRA'S R UT

6
12
0
S
4
5
13
0
s

GB
9
16
17
17
19
23%

New York 11, St. Louis 3.
Cleveland 4, Philadelphia 2.
Detroit 2, Boston 1.
Washington 5, Chicago 0 (N).
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Washington-Kretlow (2-
6) vs. Starr (2-5).
Cleveland at Philadelphia (2)-Lem-
on (11-9) and Wynn (10-11) vs. Shantz
(9-8) or Kellner (7-8) and Martin (6-
3).
St. Louis at New York (2)-Garver
(13-5) and Pillette (5-10) vs. Lopat
(13-6) and Reynolds (11-6).
Detroit at Boston (2)-Stuart (3-0)
and Trucks (5-5) vs. Parnell (11-8)
and Masterson (3-0).

Chicago 7, Boston 6.
Pittsburgh 7, Philadelphia 3.
Cincinnati 7, Brooklyn 3.
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh (2)--
Meyer (8-9) and Church (11-6) vs.
LaPalme (1-4) and Friend (4-7).
Brooklyn at Cincinnati (2)-Branca
(8-3) and Schmitz (1-4) vs. Fox (6-6)
and Raffensberger (11-12).
Boston at Chicago (2)-Nichols (5-
3) and Spahn (12-9) vs. McLish (3-4)
and Hiller (6-9).
New York at St. ouis--Jansen (14-9)
vs. Staley (12-10).
New York 10, St. Louis 0 (N).

Poll Shows Commissioner's
Job Has No 'Best Candidate'

FREDDY'S READY-Fred Hutchinson, Detroit Tiger pitcher, sends Yankee second baseman Gerry
Coleman sailing as he whips the ball to first in a try for a double play. The action took place in
the eighth inning of the first game of a doubleheader at New York. The Tigers won, 9-8.

BIG DON Newcombe's
game winning streak came
end at Cincinnati as the
combed the Dodger ace for
their runs in five innings.
Blackwell, pitching his first

nine-
to an
Reds
all of
Ewell
com-

EXPRESS INDIGNA TION:

plete game since July 15, gained
his 10th victory against as many
setbacks.
The Reds jumped Newcombe
for four runs in the fourth.
Rookie Roy McMillan climaxed
the uprising with a two-run
single. The Reds tagged New-
combe for three more in the
fifth to clinch the game.
Little Murry Dickson turned in
his 14th victory for the last place
Pirates in beating the Phils. Ralph
Kiner's 28th homer in the fourth
inning and Gus Bell's 12th home
run in the seventh eased Dick-
son's task.
Hank Sauer doubled home the
winning run for the Cubs in their
overtime victory over Boston at
Chicago. Lefty Joe Hatten held
the Braves hitless after relieving
Dutch Leonard in the ninth to
pick up his second victory.
In Night games, the Chicago
White Sox clashed with the Sen-
ators in Washington and the New
York Giants tangled with the
Cards in St. Louis.

.Cadets Hold Pep' M eeting

NEW YORK-(IP)-A confiden-
tial poll of the big league club own-
ers made by the Associated Press
indicated yesterday there is no
outstanding candidate in the field
for commissioner of baseball.
In fact, strong opposition was
expressed against making a final
choice at the meeting to be held
Tuesday (Aug. 7).
INSTEAD THE sentiment seems
to be to narrow down the list of
candidates to three or four, with
the final ballot coming some weeks
later.
In order to get the right man,
said one owner, baseball is ready
to boost the salary to $75,000
yearly. A. B. Chandler, who was
refused re-election after serving
since 1945, received $65,000.
Several owners mentioned the
possibility of a military man. The
name most widely discussed in
this connection is General Doug-
las MacArthur.
OTHERS TALKED of a business
man. So far no top flight bus-

iness executive has been mentioned
except James A. Farley,
Three big baseball names came
up spontaneously in the discus-
sions-Ford Frick, president of
the National League; George
Trautman, head of the minor
Jeagues; and Warren Giles, pre-
sident of the Cincinnati Reds.
One owner said he wanted to
settle Tuesday on about four can-
didates-one each from the worlds
of baseball, public life, business,
and military affairs.
Said another:
"I am emphatically not in fa-
vor of a politician or a baseball
man. A politician might be in
favor now, and out of favor to-
morrow. A baseball man is sure
to have some petty grievances. I
just want to narrow down the
field, and then take a good look
at each man. We don't want to
make a snap judgment."
To the direct question," have
you a candidate?" Every club own-
er flatly said "No."

WEST POINT, N.Y. - (k) - 1
Tight-lipped officials at West
Point steadfastly refused to give
names in the scandal involving 90
cadets accused of cheating at ex-
aminations, but it appeared that
most of Army's once-mighty foot-
ball team was included.
"No one has been discharged or
dismissed to this moment," said,
the Academy Public Information
Officer.
A GROUP OF discharged ca-
dets held an indignation meeting
around reporters here yesterday,
and one of them, who declined to
give his name, declared: "At least
200 corps cadets did the same
thing."
Another claimed that "over a
hundred" members of the June
graduating class cribbed in ex-
ams and escaped punishment.
Bob Blaik, star quarterback onl

SHOWERS SOUR HIM:
Lopez Says Rain Rule
Hurts Baseball, Fans

PHILADELPHIA - P) -- Ball'
games halted by rain in the late
innings should be played to com..
pletion next time the teams in-
volved meet, says Al Lopez, man-
ager of the Cleveland Indians.
The Major League rain rule
automatically gives victory to the
team, in front if the regulation
4% (when home team is leading)
or 5 innings (visitors hold the
edge) has been played.
"IT ISN'T FAIR to the teams
or the fans. Every game should
be played to completion even if it
takes another day to finish the
job," Lopez said.
The Indians' skipper referred
to the now famous Chicago
-'

White Sox-New York Yankee
game recently in which the Sox
scored three runs in the ninth
inning to take a lead that sub-
sequently was washed out by a
rain storm.
Many big league managers and
players are of the same opinion.
They think the rain rule is ridicu-
lous. Just in case big league base-
ball rule makers have short mem-
ories it was only seven years ago
that rain almost decided a pen-
nant.
It happened in 1945. Hank
Greenberg came out of the Army
to hit a bases-loaded home run
on the last day of the season to
win the pennant for Detroit.
But Big Hank almost didn't get
to hit that now famous circuit
clout. It wps a dark, damp day
in St. Louis for that final game
seven years ago. A twin-bill was
scheduled. The two teams wait-
ed several hours for the weather
to clear enough to get in one
game.
If Detroit had not been able to
play that day they would have
won the American League pen-
nant. The second place Washing-
ton Senators, who had finished
their schedule a week earlier, were
exactly one game behind. They
needed a double Detroit defeat to
tie for the flag. Rain could have
cheated Washington out of its
chance for a pennant tie.
Thanks to Greenberg's home
run, the Tigers won the only game
played and avoiding being called
"rain champs." That's why Lopez
urges that all scheduled games be

Army's football team and son of wires and notified us at the same
coach Earl H. Blaik, was in the time, for anybody to have notifiedI
group which talked to reporters. the individuals any earlier."
He declined to say whether he was One boy in the group said, "We,
among the ousted cadets, although are going to demand honorable
he used the pronoun "we" when discharges."
discussing them.
Young Blaik bitterly criticized ARMY OFFICIALS said they
the manner in which the cadets proposed to issue discharges which
wehe msann"er in hwch heredotswould not be labelled either hon-
llowed to notify our parents all orable or dishonorable. All ousted
aoe tountiy advance," h& cadets would be subject to the
ovrthe country indane rat
isaid. "First notice they got was dathecibn.ytm sds
from the newspapers and over the rie cribbing system, as des-
radio."ribed by an Army spokesman,
Col. lames B. Leer, West was a simple one. Examinations
oitbl.cJnfosmBtioneoies are given to sections of students.
Point pubec information officer, Those in the first section tipped
hat thpress conferen ter off cadets in later sections as
thatthblmefAry hinwahington to what the questions were.
was to blame for the way the Coach Blaik, whose teams have
won 75 games, lost 11 and tied
"It was impossible," he said, six in the last 10 seasons, was
"due to the fact that the Army contacted briefly by reporters af-
put out the news on the (press) ter dodging them for almost 24
hours. Asked for comment, he said
flatly: "No."
aseball'sAT INDIANA, PA., it was dis-
closed that Edward Stahura, a
BigOrsix guard with two more years of eli-
gibility, has resigned from the
Academy June 1. His mother, Mrs.
By The Associated Press Mary Helen Stahura, said her son
Leading batsmen (based on 250 times resigned because of accumulated
at bat). demerits.
Player and Club G B A R HPct "Why, you even get them for
Musial, Cards. 98 363 79 135 .372 laughing in ranks," she said,
Ashburn, Phill. 102 428 66 150 .350
Robinson, Ddgrs. 99 351 71 123 .350 adding that Edward had ac-
Minoso, W. Sox 100 359 84 124 .345 cepted "a very nice scholarship
Coan, Senators 87 341 63 114 .334 to the University of Illinoisn."
Fain, Athletics 82 293 37 98 .334 "Insofar as I know, the evidence
* * * does not bear out the statement
RUNS BATTED IN that any graduates have been in-
National League volved," Colonel Leer said. News-
Kiner, Pirates........................men asked Leer to arrange a
Irvin, Giants.. '.." meeting for them with the super-
Snider, Dodgers .................. 72 intendent, but he said:
American League "He is terribly busy. He has
Williams, Red Sox................ 93 no new information which was
Robinson, White sox.............83 not made public. As soon as he
zernial, Athletics ................ 83 has, I am sure he will give that
Rosen, Indians ..... .............. 73 t o n ilseT ua
Rosen * *to you and will see you."
HOME RUNS Leer, who said Friday the Ar-
National League my would still field a football
Hodges,NDodgersna L.team this fall, insisted again that
Hiner, Piratess....................28 no names would be announced.
Musial, Cardinals ................ 23
American League Tragedy in God Cup
zernial, Athletics .................24 SEATTLE-()-The speedboat
Williams, Red sox ............... 22 Slo-Mo-Ehun V won the Gold Cup
Volmer, Red Sox ..18 yesterday in a race cut short by
the tragic sinking of another par-
Mliddlecoff Leads ticipant, the Quicksilver, with two
men aboard.
CHICAGO - (A) -Bullseye ap- Owner-driver. Or t h Mathiot,
proaching gave high-strung Cary Portland, Ore., tugboat operator,
Middlecoff of Memphis a scorch- and Tom Whitaker, a mechanic,
ing 66 yesterday for 10-under-par were aboard the Quicksilver which
206 and a three-stroke lead after vanished beneath the blue water
54 holes in the $15,000 Tam of scenic Lake Washington at
O'Shanter All-American pro golf high speed.
tournament.
The 1949 National Open cham-
pion, and fifth leading money win-
ner this season with $10,561,
canned four birdies with putts of
less than eight feet in coupling IMr O RTED
34-32 against the 6,915-yard 36-36
par layout.
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LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Letter from the Iraqi govern-
ment to Mr. Klinger. ) 105L
FOR SALE
RCA Automatic record changer, 78 rpm,
$10. Call evenings 3-4701. )174
AUGUST SPECIALS
for students and non students
Time..............$3.57 (44 wks.)
Life...............$7.27 (70 wks.)
Redbook..........$2.50 ($3 in Sept.)
McCalls.......... $2.50 ($3 in Sept.)
Am. Home... ........$2.00 (13 mos.)
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Student Periodical Agency, 2-8242
) 173
PRICES ROLLED BACK
Men's Seersucker Pants $2.00
Navy "T" Shirts 39c
Short Sleeve Sport Shirts $1.49
Rayon Swim Trunks $1.66
Open 'til 6 P.M.
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington )170
COLLEGIATE
HAIR STYLES
Specializing in
" crew cuts
" short cuts
" personality styles
- 7 hair cutters -
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State

FOR SALE

TROPICAL FISH -- Aquatic plants,
aquarium supplies. Sure there's a
place in Ann Arbor. Call 3-0224. ) 169
PARAKEETS, Canaries, and Finches-
New and used cages. 562 So. Seventh,
Phone 5330. )164
FOR RENT
3-BEDROOM HOME-Completely fur-
nished, Aug. 18 to Sept. 18 while own-
ers are on vacation. Located between
campus and 'U' Hospital. Call 2-6654.
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOR MEN-Spacious, double, in beau-
tiful home. Shown before noon or
after 4 P.M., 1430 Cambridge. )84R
SHARE APARTMENT with Grad Stu-
dent. Save on meals. $8 week. Big
yard, continuous hot water. Call
31791. ) 80R
MISCELLANEOUS
AT LIBERTY--German 11 and 12 in-
structor does tutoring and translation.
A. R. Neumann. 2-7909. )14M
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD AT FRATERNITY HOUSE -
Short block from Law Quad, corner
Hill and Oakland. Eating schedule at
your convenience. Really good food.
Ph. 2-1634. )3X
WANTED TO BUY
GIRLS THREE SPEED English bike in
good condition. Phone 2-5267. ) 19W

PLEASE-Phone our Office (2-8242, be-
fore ordering or renewing any maga-
zine. We can probably save you
$ $ $ $, time and trouble. Student
Periodical Agency, 330 Municipal Ct.
Bldg. )85P
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished workand hand
ironing, Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. We spe-
cialize in doing summer dresses.
TYPING WANTED-To do in my home.
Experienced. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
)40B
HELP WANTED
MOTHER'S HELPER in home until Fall
Term in exchange for room and board.
Phone 3-8454. )6,2H
STORE CLERK for Saturdays for Men's
Furnishing and Shoe Store. Prefer ex-
perienced man. Apply Sam's Store,
122 E. Washington St. )60H
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED to San Antonio or
vicinity about Aug. 18. Call 3-1408.
)40T
GRAD STUDENT AND WIFE desire ride
to N.Y.C.-Aug. 17-18. Share driving
and expense. Phone Bob Frewe 2-1254..
)41T
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TODAY Thru Tuesday
44c to 6:30 P.M.
Monday Thru Friday
SUN-KISSED MELODY!KISSED
BYMOONLIGHT ROMANCE!
I I
t;1
4'4
fill~h

ARTICLES
4RTICLES
AC,7 V ATC

The Department of Speech
In conjunction with the School of Music
Presents
OSCAR STRAUS' COMIC OPERETTA
CHOCOLATE
SO-1LDIER"
Thursday through Monday at 8 P.M.
August 9, 10, 11 and 13

played even if it takes an
day.

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