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August 05, 1951 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-08-05

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T

4

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 1951

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'CHOCOLATE SOLDIER':

Speech, Music Students
To Give Comic Operetta

By HARRIET TEPPERMAN
"The Chocolate Soldier," a com-
ic operetta by Oscar Strauss, will
be presented through the com-
bined efforts of the speech de-
partment and the music school,
beginning at 8 p.m. Thursday at
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
The final production of this
summer's drama season, Strauss'
caricature of military romance is
based on "Arms and the Man," a
play by the late George Bernard
Shaw.
COL. POPOFF, played by Da-
vid Murray, '52SM, is a comic
Bulgarian colonel whose wife and
daughter entertain a Swiss sol-
dier while the head of the family
is off to war in the Balkans.
The Swiss soldier, Capt. Bu-
merli, acted by John A. Wiles,
SM, falls in love with Popoff's
daughter Nadina. But complica-
tions arise due to the fact that
Nadina, played by Carole Neil-
sen Wilder, Grad., SM, is al-
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

ready betrothed to Alexis. Alex-
is is portrayed by Bill Thomp-
son.
Things are further confused by
the plottings of Col. Popoff's wife
and her niece, Mashia, played by
Marilyn Krimm, Grad. SM, and
Vivian Milan, '51SM, respectively.
With this twosome against him,
Alexis just doesn't have a chance.
* * *
THIS LAST production of the
season is under the direction of
Prof. Valentine B. Windt of the
Department of Speech, with mu-
sical direction by Prof. Wayne
Dunlap of the School of Music.
Prof. Dunlap will also conduct an
orchestra composed primarily of
first string players of the Univer-
sity Symphony Orchestra.
Tickets for the opening night
performance are sold out, but
tickets still remain for the per-
formances which will be given on
Friday, Saturday and Monday eve-
nings. They may be 'purchased
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily and
until 8 p.m. on performance
nights.

'U' ourses
Keep Pace
With Times
The granting of degrees to
landscape architects, wood techni-
cians and city planners testifies
to the growing specialization of,
University courses.
No longer content with the
standard cover-all programs of
Grandpa's day, the University now
offers everything from sanitary
engineering to pediatrics and runs
everything from a penal institu-
tion to a speech correction unit.
* *. *
INCLUDED AMONG the recent
June graduates were 11 students
of Russian studies and two who
studied religion and ethics, as
well as real estate men, personnel
managers and marine engineers.
Russian, Far Eastern and La-
tin American studies offering a
knowledge of cultures and civ-
ilizations through courses in the
language, history and fine arts
of the chosen area, have proved
more popular than a similar
course, AmericanCulture, ac-
cording to Prof. Benjamin
Wheeler, Chairman of the Board
of Concentration Advisors.
Another special interdepart-
mental concentration is the Ur-
ban Community program for stu-
dents interested in city planning
and administration.
Several of these highly special-
ized courses have received little
or no interest since they were in-
cluded in the curriculum. One of
them, German Classicism and Ro-
manticism, has had no takers at
all, probably because of the diver-
sity of the pre-requisites, Prof.
Wheeler explained.
* * *
THE MAJORITY of the special
programs are combinations of
fields. These combinations include
law, medicine, dentistry and com-
bined science courses, such as
biophysics and paleozoology.
One student even listed his field
of concentration in the 1951 'En-
sian as "power."

Radio

TV

LOOK and LISTEN

By MARILYN FLORIDIS
A full-hour radio adaptation of
Daphne du Maurier's "Rebecca"'
will start off the NBC radio cal-
endar this week.
Presented by the "New Theatre"
at 7:30 p.m. today, the show will
feature Eva Le Gallienne as host-
ess.
RISE STEVENS, star of opera,
radio and motion pictures, will be
guest soloist on the "NBC Sym-
phony Orchestra Summer Concert
Series," heard at 8:30 p.m. today.
Popular operatic bass Enzio
Pinza will sing the song he made
famous, "Some Enchanted Eve-
ning," when he guest stars on
"The Telephone Hour" at p.m.
tomorrow.,
CBS WILL HAVE a premiere
today of a new morning piano
series, "Keyboard Concerts." The
program will be heard at 9:45
a.m. and will star American pi-
anist-composer Grace Castagnet-
ta as its soolist.
This week's "Curt Massey
Time" program will begin with
selections by Oscar Hammer-
stein tomorrow. The show is
heaerd at 6:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Starring Wendell Corey in Ro-
bert E. Sherwood's stage and
screen play "The Petrified For-
est," the "Philip Morris Play-
house" program will be heard at
:30 p.m. Thursday.
" * *
UNIVERSITY Speech Depart-
ment Radio will present a fan-
tasy "Mythical Merry-Go-
Round," for its Angell Hall Play-
house production this week. The
show is heard at 7:30 p.m. Tues-
days on WUOM, and 8:30 p.m.
on WHRV.
Scheduled for Friday is the Ra-
dio Workshop Drama's presenta-
tion of "Hamlet. The Shakes-
perean drama will be broadcast
at 4 p.m. over WPAG and WUOM.

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By MIKE BOOM
Many summer session students
who have seen television for the
first time during these hot months
after a lifetime in the backwoods
of the Upper Peninsula have
fearfully asked us if TV is always
like this.
Fortunately, we can answer in
the negative, for this summer's
TV offerings have been pitifully
lacking in quality. Few of the
shows which began as "summer
replacements" will ever progress
beyond that status, and several
aren't even finishing out the sum-
mer.
"AMOS 'n ANDY" took to the
airways this summer after a four-
year search for a cast and a tre-
mendous amount of advance pub-
licity. Critics praised the show but
the public has not gone overboard
for it.
Now the National Association
for the Advancement of Color-
ed People has attacked "Amos
'n Andy" for using stereotyped
Negro portrayals much like the
movies used to do.
It will be interesting to see what
action CBS takes, because it is
impossible to rewrite the show.
It is filmed in Los Angeles and
the programs for the next 25
weeks have already been made.
* * *
CBS' OFFERINGS have not
been successful in general. Oscar
Levant did not hit it off well with
critics or the public on his Sunday
night "Guest House," and Dur-
ward Kirby has been trying to
keep the show moving for the past
month.
"Summer Theatre" kept Mon-
day nights alive for the first
few weeks of the summer, but it
is now doing repeats of "Studio
One" shows that weren't too
well-received in the first place.
The other networks have not
fared too well either, as more and
more TV sets are being switched
off earlier each evening. NBC,
remembering Ransom Sherman's
success last summer as the re-
placement for "Kukla, Fran, &
Ollie," came up with a strange
young gentleman named Ernie
Kovacs. After the first few weeks,
Ernie's style became somewhat
tiresome and he has yet to ap-
proach Sherman in our estimation.

Clearance of Spring &
Summer wearables *

at Reductions of

1/2

original price - many
items far below!
SPRING COATS
Short and long-gabardines, suedes
- many lined for late fall wear.
Orig. 39.95 to 65.00. Now at 1/.
price.
Groups of DRESSES
Silk prints, shantungs, honans, ray-
on crepes, prints, sheers, bembergs,
cotton laces. Orig. 14.95 to 39.95
at 1/ price. Evening and dinner
dresses included.

I'l

SPRING SUITS
1 00% wools in checks and gabar-
dines -pastels, greys, tans, a few
dark shades. Orig. 39.95 to 65.00.
Sizes 9-15, 10-20.

-*

Smo
YOUR FIGURE
WITH THE NEW HI-WAIST
A 4i r ounce party and
girdle with a 1 i,2 inch
cuff above the waist that
molds and controls with-
out binding or rolling.
Front and back satin
elastic panels with power
net sides flatten tummy
and slim the hips for that
longer look that fashion
demands.
Small, medimn, large
in white, pink, and black
X00 and 750

/ Yearly

SUMMER SUITS
Special group of famous-make wool
and rayon suits, many dark checks,
good for fall wear at 18.00. Sizes
10-20, 14-24.
Special group Summer Suits at 1/2
price, orig. 16.95 to 29.95.

s
.1

4.
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-41

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Groups of DRESSES-Cottons,
voiles, chambreys, tissue ging-
hams, broadcloths, picolays,
linens at 7.00, 10.00, 13.00.
Orig. 8.95 to 25.00. Sizes 9-
15, 10-44, 12-24.
SLIPS - Group of beautifully
lace-trimmed nylon tricots 7.00.
3 Groups of GOWNS-Rayon
crepe and tricots. 2.98, 3.98,
5.95. Sizes 32-44.

Groups of BLOUSES-Cottons,
linens, rayon crepes, Tub-i-
nyl's, silk prints.--Orig. 3.95
to 10.95 -- at 1.98 to 5.00.
Sizes 32-44.
3 Groups SLIPS-Cottons and
rayon crepes, lace trimmed.
1.98, 2.98 and 3.98. Sizes
32-44.

SKIRTS - Cottons and rayon
gabardines-checks and plaids.
Orig. 5.95 to 10.95 at 2.98
to 3.98 and 5.00.
Group of PETTICOATS-1.98
and 2.98-Cottons and rayon
crepes. Orig. value to 3.00.
ODDS & ENDS in gloves of 98c.
Group of COSTUME JENYELRY
at 49c and 98c.

Y

;.

(Continued from Page 2)
Student Recital: Charles Fisher,
graduate student in piano, will be
heard at 8:30 Wednesday evening, Aug-
8, in the Rackham Assembly Hall, in
a program of works by Bach, Mozart,
Debussy, and Schubert, played in par-
tial fulfillment of the requirements for
the Master of Music degree. Mr. Fish-
er is a pupil of Joseph Brinkman, and
his program will be open to the public.
Coming Lectures
Monday, August 6-
Biophysics Symposium. 1300 Chemis-
try Building. "viruses: Structure, Re-
production, and Origin" (cont.), S. E.
Luria, University of Illinois, 4:00 p.m.;
"Phage Activation and Reproduction

Excitation of Sensory Cells," M. Del-
bruck, California Institute of Techno-
logy, 7:30 p.m.
Biophysics Seminar. "Exploratory
Work with InfraRed in Bacteriology."
Prof. H. M. Randall, Dr. E. Fowler, 11
a.m. 2038 Randall Laboratory.
Tuesday, August 7--
Biophysics Symposium. 1300 Chemis-
try Building. "viruses: Structure, Re-
production, and Origin" (cont.), S. E.
Luria, University of Illinois, 4:00 p.m.;
"Structure of Proteins," J. L. Oncley,
Harvard University, 10 a.m., 2038 Ran-
dall Lab.
Linguistic Program. "The Present
Stage of Romance Linguistic Geogra-
phy," Henry R. Kahane, University of
Illinois. 7:30 p.m., Rackham Amphi-
theater.

ODDS & ENDS in hatters
denim slacks-jackets--at
price.

-/z

0:

The VAN BUREN Shop
S Nickels Arcade

YOU HAVE A DATE'

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wit

an excivtn,

new1

FALL SUIT

DORMITORY TRIO
FOR SLEEP AND LOUNGE
Robe and Pajama
Match-Mates

.y-

' '3
!'.mow
.I
a, 3
:3

EVELYN
PEARSON
tailors a
travel-trio
of washable
rayon crepe

7

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17 95

A.-

There's nothing so easy to travel
with, or to lounge in around the
dormitory than these matching
?.robes and pajamas. The pajamas,
cut bell-boy style with large
SJwhite pearlized buttons, are
roomy and comfortable for
sleeping; the robes, piped with
white, are easy to wear for re-
faxing or studying. Red, aqua
or navy. Sizes 10 to 20.

SHOT GUN CHECKS..
LAMPL fashion winner . .. with pocket pret-
tied waist-hugging jacket and slim skirt.
Firm-bodied wrinkle-resistant rayon-and-acetate
fabric.
ONE TOUCH OF VELVET .

I >
.4 ..,
;«>4
;<;

,,

'round the clock beauty that knows no
season. Of Steven's wrinkle-resistant sheen
gabardine ... with soft velvet touches in
buttons and pockets.
Vibrant Fall Colors

f ksNVOMEt
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11

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