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August 04, 1951 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-08-04

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Red Sox, Indians Gain as Yankees Split Ti

cin Bill

* *

Boston Tames Tigers, 5-2;
Tribe Edges Athletics, 3-2

>

NEW YORK-(i)-The last place St. Louis Browns walloped the
New York Yankees, 10-2, in the second game yesterday after the
league leaders won the opener, 8-4.
Jim McDonald, rookie from Louisville, gained his first victory of
the season in the night cap. Big Vic Raschi, Yankee ace, posted his
16th win of the season in the opener.
* * * *
BOTH YANKEE RUNS off McDonald were unearned. The young
righthander, who was purchased from the Boston Red Sox a couple
ofUI WttcLSi llrU itfor LRncIAJn r d6

Clause O.K.,
Says Minor
League Czar
WASHINGTON-(IP) - George
Trautman, the big boss of base-
ball's little fellows, testified today
that Congress will have to act to
keep the game going if it is ever
to be in violation of anti-trust
laws.
This view came in answer to a
question put by Rep. McCullouch
(R-Ohio), member of the House
judiciary subcommittee that is
trying to find out if the national
pastime needs exemption from
monopoly legislation.

or weeKs ago after Boston recaie
him from Louisville, scattered nine
hits.
The Brownies clinched the
game in the fourth inning by
scoring seven runs, the largest
one-inning blast against the
F Yankees all season. Bob Wiesler,
-fast rookie lefty from Kansas
City, was knocked out of the box
in that frame.
Key blow' of the session was a
bases-filled double by ex-Giant
Bill Jennings. Jack Maguire, ano-
ther former New York National
Leaguer, led the Browns' attack
with three blows.
* * *
A SMALL CROWD of 10,047
came out to see Raschi roughed
for four hits and two runs in the
opening inning by the cellar team.
But the big right-hander recover-
ed after the shaky start and was
steady for the remainder of the
day. The additional scores were un-
earned. Vic whiffed six, raising his
total to 114-top figure in the ma-
jors.
Tommy Byrne, former Yan-
kee, was laced for six runs in
the second inning as the Yankees
sent 11 men to bat. Two walks,
a hit batsman and five hits were
included in the attack, Gil Mc-
Dougald, rookie infielder, cli-
maxed it with his eighth homer
with one on..
Lefty Maury McDermott fire-
balled the Boston Red Sox to a
5-2 win over the Detroit Tigers.
It enabled the Red Sox to move to
a half game of the top place New
York Yankees while continuing
in a second place tie with the
Cleveland Indians.
THIS SERIES OPENER, inter-
rupted by rain for 56 minutes aft-
er the eighth inning, was decided
by McDermott's first major league
home run. It was slammed against
loser Dizzy Trout with two on base
in the second inning.
It was McDermott's seventh
win against five losses.
McDermott received but little
offensive support. Ted Williams
went hitless on four tries and Clyde
Vollmer struck out three times and
grounded into a double play.
IN ADDITION to scattering sev-
en Detroit hits and fanning six
Tigers, thereby boosting his sea-
son's total to 168 in 26 games, Mc-
Dermott connected safely thrice.
On his last turn at bat, in the
sixth, he singled in Billy Good-
man with the final Boston mark-
er.
Bob Kennedy's two bagger down
the left field line off ex-teammat
Sam Zoldak, gave the Cleveland
Inldians a 3-2 victory over the
Philadelphia Athletics and moved
the rampaging Tribe to withir

half a game of the league leading
New York Yankees.
* * *
MEXICAN MIKE Garcia, swar-
thy righthander, recorded his 14th
win of the season against seven
defeats, although he needed help
from Early Wynn in the eighth
when the Athletics threatened.
Garcia allowed eight hits and two
runs, walked one and struck out
two in his seven an dtwo thirds
innings on the mound.
A crowd of 21,541 saw Mana-
ger Al Lopez' hustling Indians
win the game with a two run
rally in the eighth inning that
routed Zoldak. It set the Phi-
ladelphia left hander up for
his sixth defeat of the season
against three vitcories.
Ed Stewart and Orestes Minoso
contributed three hits each to a
12-hit attack as the Chicago
White Sox defeated Washington,
7-4. Saul Rogovin held the Sen-
ators to eight hits to capture his
seventh win.
* * *
THE CINCINNATI REDS, paced
by iron-nerved Willie Ramsdell's
tremendous pitching, scored the
winning run on a passed ball in
the bottom of the 14th inning to
spill the front-running Brooklyn
Dodgers, 5-4.
After the Brooks had gone
ahead in the top half of Roy
Campanella's single and Billy
Cox's triple, the Cincinnatians
got two runs to win. Bob Nsher
led off with a single and was
sacrificed to second. Hank Ed-
wards lashed a pinch-hit dou-
ble to score Usher and went to
third on a wild pitch by Ralph
Branca. Roy Campanella's pass-
ed ball brought Edwards in with
the fifth and winning tally.
The St. Louis Cardinals scored
all their runs in the seventh-in-
rng- surge featured by Stan Mu-
sial's three-run triple and then
weathered a New York uprising
in the eighth to defeat the Giants
5-4 tonight before 13,662 fans.
* * *
BRINGING HOME the winning
run himself, Pitcher Paul Minner
* led the Chicago Cubs to a 2 to 1
triumph over the Boston Braves.
The victory, achieved before a La-
dies Day gathering of 14,28,
brought the Cubs' record to 500
under Manager Phil Cavarretta
with seven wins in 14 games.
Robin Roberts hurled his 14th
win of the season against eight
losses as the Philadelphia Phillies
edged the Pittsburgh Pirates 5-4
before a crowd of 13,607. The
Pirates scored all of their runs
e in the third inning.

VIC RASCHI
. . gains 16th win

DARK DAY FOR BLACK KNIGHTS:
West Point Scandal Decimates Team

Major League
Standings

AND THE question
in such a way that
league ruler. had only1

was asked
the minor
to reply:

AMERICAN
Wv
New York ... 61
Boston........61
Cleveland ... 61
Chicago. 57
Detroit ........45
Washington . 44
Philadelphia 39
St. Louis .... 32

LEAGUE
L Pet.
38 .616
39 .610
39 .610
45 .558
52 .463
56 .440
63 .382
68 .320

GB
If
y/
51j
15
171 /
231/
291/

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 5, Detroit 2.
New York 8, St. Louis 4 (first
game).
St. Louis 10, New York 2 (second
game).
Cleveland 3, Philadelphia 2.
Chicago 7, Washington 4.
TODAY'S PITCHERS
Chicago at Washington-(night --
Holcombe (8-6) vs. Marrero (10-5).
Cleveland at Philadelphia- Feller
(16-4) vs. Fowler (4-7).
St. Louis at New-York-Suchecki
(0-5) vs. Kuzava (6-5.
Detroit atzBoston-Hutchinson (8-
6) vs. Kiely (2-1).

"Yes, that's true."
McCulloch had to phrase his
query carefully because of his first
effort, Trautman declined to an-
swer on the ground that it had
"legal involvements."
* * * "
IN OTHER WORDS, Trautman
guarded against accepting any as-
sumption that organized baseball,
with its reserve clause governing
players and territorial rights deal-
ing with franchises, is anything
but strictly lawful.
But he was crystal-clear in
telling the committee that or-
ganized baseball will have to
keep its reserve clause intact if
it is to remain in operation.
Chairman Celler (D-N.Y.) at
one point asked if he could ad-
vance any arguments against the
reservation provision of player
contracts "just to give us some
information."
Trautman smiled, fiddled with
his glasses, and answered:
"I haven't heard anything good
about the abandonment of the
reserve clause."

ROY CAMPANELLA
*-..passed ball costly
Larsen, Flam
Win Cup Tests
RYE, N. Y., - (P) - National
Champion Art Larsen of San
Leandro, Calif., and Herbie Flam
of Los Angeles provided a one-
two punch to give the United
States a 2-0 lead over Mexico in
the semi-finals of the American
zone Davis Cup tennis competi-
tion yesterday.
The slender lefthanded Larsen
was forced to go all out to con-
quer 27-year-old Armando Vega,
7-5, 6-3, 4-6, 7-5, at the swank
Westchester Country Club.
Uncle Sam's volleying neph-
ews now are in a position to
clinch a finalist zone berth by
winning today's doubles.
If the Americans prevail, as ex-
pected, they will qualify to meet
the Canada-Cuba victor for the
American zone title. The Canada-
Cuba series was postponed today
in Montreal because of rain.
The American Zone winner
then must engage Sweden, the
European winner, for the right to
challenge Australia for the his-
toric trophy.

(Continued from Page 1)
daily recitations or tests which
would indicate answers prior to
or during written tests or reci-
tations."
The mass dismissals, announced
by the Army yesterday, were the
largest since the United States
military academy was founded in
1802.
The Army was tight - lipped
about details of the misconduct
of its student officers. Byrd re-
ported, however, that at a con-
ference of Senators in his office,
Collins said the cheating had been
going on for four or five years.
Collins was quoted as having
told the Senators that the cheat-
ing involved some men who have
been graduated from the Acade-
my, including two or three killed
in action in Korea. Byrd report-
ed that Collins said no discip-
linary action would be taken
against officers who have left
West Point.
It was reported that the same
questions were used for exams
given at different times. Men who
took them first passed the ques-
tions on to cadets scheduled to
take later exams.
* * *.
MAJ. GEN. Frederick A. Irving,
the Academy's superintendent, ac-
knowledged that the action taken
against the 90 cadets was "stern
and uncompromising," but he
added in a statement issued at
West Point:
"After weighing all factors most
carefully, I, and the responsible
heads of the Army, are convinced
that there should be no compro-
mise solution that would preserve

the vital honor system of West
Point, which is the very heart of
the academy."
The Army's announcement
said the names of the dis-
charged cadets wil not be re-
leased "so that no undue criti-
cism of the individuals con-
cerned will result."
There will still be football at
West Point this fall. Army sourc-
es said Irving has promised that
the team wil play out its schedule
even if West Point were to lose
every game 100 to 0.
COLLINS WAS said to have
blamed an over-emphasis on foot-
ball for thecunexpected break-
down in the Academy's honor sys-
tem. Byrd quoted him as saying
that the cribbing started among
the football players, who found it
difficult to keep up with their
work while spending so much time
practicing.
The cheating, since it was re-
ported to have extended back
four or five years, cast a cloud
on much of the postwararecord
of a mighty football team.
Army had been expected to field
one of the strongest teams in the
nation this fall. Its 1950 team
won eight games and lost only
one-a 14-2 upset to the Navy.
And the team suffered relatively
light graduation losses.
* * *
NOW WHAT IS left of the
team - that - might - have-been is
strictly conjecture. Blaik and his
staff were on vacation when the
announcement was made.
The team that was built last
spring saw the coach's own son,
Bob, as the quarterback. There

was no indication that he or
any other specific Army stars
was involved in the dismissals.
In the 1951 offensive backfield
with young Blaik would be Al
Pollard, the Los Angeles transfer
who was expected to be one of the
corps' greatest fullbacks, a n d
Gene Filipski and Vic Pollock at
the halfback posts.
HAL LEOHLEIN, last year a
third string end, was shifted to
guard and had been elected cap-
tain. Jack Chambin was the
nominee for the other guard post.
Bob Haas, the 200-pounder
from Dayton, Ohio, was back for
another season at center and
Jim Guardino and Lew Zeigler
were the likely starting tackles.
John Weaver and Dick Roberts,
last year a guard, had been as-
signed the end positions.
Army, which brought the two-
platoon system into popularity,
lacked depth in the defensive unit
but Coach Blaik did have a tough
core of talent that would have
equalled the offensive team in
every way except numbers.
* * *
GIBBY REICH was the back-
field safety man while Don Beck
and Elmer Stout were recognized
last year as probably the best pair
of linebackers on any team in the
country.
And up front Blaik was relying
on Raymond Malavasi, a guard,
and J. D. Kimmel, a bruising 210-
pound tackle from Texarkanna,
Tex. Before Malavasi was injured
at the start of last season, Blaik
was quoted as rating Malavasi as
the greatest line prospect to enter
West Point during his tenure as
coach.

NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn .... 64
New York ... 57
Philadelphia 51
St. Louis .... 47
Boston . . 46
Cincinnati .. 46
Chicago ..... 42
Pittsburgh .. 40

LEAGUE
L Pet.
34 .653
47 .548
50 .505
49 .490
50 .479
52 .469
52 .447
59 .404

7
F

GB
10
14 2
16
17
18
20
24%
in-

ELIKIN

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 5, Pittsburgh 4.
Cincinnati 5, Brooklyn 4 (14
nings).
Chicago 2, Boston 1.
St. Louis 5, New York 4.

Barnum's Lead in Pro Tourney
Dwindles to a Sinole Stroke

TODAY'S PITCHERS
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh-John-
son 2-1 vs. Dickson (13-10).
Brooklyn at Cincinnati-Newcombe
(15-4) vs. Blackwell (9-10.
Boston at Chicago-Wilson (3-2) vs.
Lowe (2-6).
New York at St. Louis-(night)-
Koslo (5-8) vs. Chambers (7-9.
Lions Waiver
Kral, Magnani
YPSILANTI-(P)-The Detroit
Lions today placed two veterans
on the waiver list, the first move
to trim the squad since practice
opened two days ago.
The waivers were asked on Jer-
ry Krall and Dante Magnani, both
halfbacks.
* *' *
KRALL, who lives in Toledo,
O., played with Ohio State and
was in his second year with the
Lions. Magnani, a 10-year-pro-
fessional football veteran, is from
Vallejo, Calif., and played with
St. Mary's.
Coach Buddy Parker said he
wouldn't cut any rookies from
the roster until he has had a
chance to see them in action.
The squad meantime named
Johnny Trchlik, a veteran tackle
from Yale and halfback Bob
Hoernschmeyer of Indiana as co-
captains this year. They replace
end Johnny Greene and Guard
Les Bingaman.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

CHICAGO-(A)-John Barnum,C
the big golfer with the tiny repu-
tation, staggered through a sec-
ond-round blowup from an open-
ing 64 to a two-over-par 74 but
still clung to a halfway lead of
one stroke in the $15,000 All-
American pro tourney today.
Hard on the heels of the strap-
ping pace-setter from Grand Rap-
ids, Mich., who wabbled to a 36-
hole total of 138, were four play-
ers bracketed at 139. These includ-
ed 1947 U.S. Tpen Champion Lew
Worsham of Oakmont, Pa.; Fred
Hawkins of El Paso, Tex.; Ted
Kroll, Purple Heart veteran from
New Hartford, N.Y.; and Al Bes-
selink, tall blond pro from Mt.
Clemens, Mich. Besselink's 34-34
-68 was the day's best round.
* * *
HIGH WINDS which swept Tam
O'Shanter's par 36-36-72 course
and a chilly putter ruined unher-
alded Barnum's chance for a one-
man show in the 72-hole medal
test and tossed the scramble for
the $2,250 top prize up for grabs.
Still very much in the run-
ning only two strokes behind,
were four 140 shooters, includ-
ing the host pro and year's lead-
ing money, winner, Lloyd Man-
grum, who had himself shadow-
ed by two policemen on the
course.
Mangrum, who reported his life
was threatened last weekend in
an anonymous phone call warn-
ing him not to win the St. Paul
open, scored his second straight
70 with his two faithful gendarmes
plodding patiently behind.
AOSO BRACKETED at 140 were
Cary Middlecoff, 1949 U.S. Open
Champion from Memphis, Tenn.,
who stroked a second-round 69;
Lawson Little, 41-year-old veteran
from Pebble Beach, Calif., who
also bagged a 69; and Tommy
Bolt, Durham, N.C., who boked
a 72.

Gay Jimmy Demaret of Ojai,
Calif., who tied for the first
round runner-up spot with Haw-
kins at 67, was notched at 141
with a wobbly second-round 74.
Four strokes behind Barnum at
142 were Jack Burke of Houston,
Tex., a 73 -hooter today, and
Chick Harbert, the Northville,
Mich., knocker, who faded to 74.
Defending Champion Bobby
Locke of Johannesburg, South Af-
rica, wound up five strokes off the
pace in the 143 bracket as he reg-
istered a 72 after an opening 71.
* * *
IN THE concurrent All-Ameri-
can Amateur, Defending Cham-
pion Frank Strnnahan of Toledo,
Ohio, culled a 73 after an opening
66 and held a seven stroke lead
with139gover HaroldaForeman,
Jr., Chicago's Illinois State Cham-
pion.
Foreman, whose 71 was the
day's best round, had a 36-hole
total of 146.
The All-American women's open
reached the halfway mark with
Defending Champion Babe Zahar-
ias of Skycrest two strikes in
front. Mrs. Zaharias, for the sec-
ond rtraight day, rapped a 76 for
a 36-hole aggregate of 152. Bev-
erly Hanson of Pasadena, Calif.,
also a pro, dropped from co-lead-
ership with the Babe to 154 with
a second-round 78.
DO YOU KNOW ... that the
New Haven Swim Club set a
new world's record in the 400-
yard free style relay April 6,
1951 with a time of 3:23.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone23.-24-1
HOURS.1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
FOR SALE
RCA Automatic record changer, 78 rpm,
$10. Call evenings 3-4701. )174
AUGUST SPECIALS
for students and non students
Time............. ..$3.57 (44 wks.)
Life........... .... ..$7.27 (70 wks.)
Redbook.........$2.50 ($3 in Sept.)
McCalls..........$2.50 ($3 in Sept.)
Am. Home...........$2.00 (13 mos.)
U.S. News &
World Report......$3.27 (44 wks.)
Student Periodical Agency, 2-8242
)173
D-FROSTO-MATIC ICE BOX DEFROS-
TERS-Originally $12.95. Now $4.00.
Brand new, guaranteed. )172
PRICES ROLLED BACK
Men's Seersucker Pants $2.00
Navy "T" Shirts 39c
Short Sleeve Sport Shirts $1.49
Rayon Swim Trunks $1.66
Open 'til 6 P.M.
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington )170
TROPICAL FISH - Aquatic plants,
aquarium supplies. Sure there's a
place in Ann Arbor. Call 3-0224. )169
PARAKEETS, Canaries, and Finches-
New and used cages. 562 So. Seventh,
Phone 5330. )164
FOR RENT
WOMAN graduate student wanted to
share apartment. Call 3-4073 after
6 p.m.) )40F
Read Daily Classifieds

FOR RENT
3-BEDROOM HOME-Completely fur-
nished, Aug. 18 to Sept. 18 while own-
ers are on vacation. Located between
campus and 'U' Hospital. Call 2-6654.
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOR MEN-Spacious, double, in beau-
tiful home. Shown before noon or
after 4 P.M., 1430 Cambridge. )84R
SHARE APARTMENT with Grad Stu-
dent. Save on meals. $8 week. Big
yard, continuous hot water. Call
31791. )80R
MISCELLANEOUS
AT LIBERTY-German 11 and 12 in-
structor does tutoring and translation.
A. R. Neumann. 2-7909. )14M
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD AT FRATERNITY HOUSE -
Short block from Law Quad, corner
Hill and Oakland. Eating schedule at
your convenience. Really good food.
Ph. 2-1634. )3X
PERSONAL
PLEASE-Phone our office (2-8242 be-
fore ordering or renewing anymaga-
zine. We can probably save you
$ $ $ $, time and trouble. Student
Periodical Agency, 330 Municipal Ct.
Bldg. )65P

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Freepick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. We spe-
cialize in doing summer dresses.
TYPING WANTED-To do in my home.
Experienced. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
)40B
HELP WANTED
MOTHER'S HELPER in home until Fall
Term in exchange for room and board.
Phone 3-8454. )62H
STORE CLERK for Saturdays for Men's
Furnishing and Shoe Store. Prefer ex-
perienced man. Apply Sam's Store,
122 E. Washington St.: )60H
TRANSPORTATION
GRAD STUDENT AND WIFE desire ride
to N.Y.C.-Aug. 17-18. Share driving
and expense. Phone Bob Frese 2-1264.
)41T
COLORED WOMAN leaving for Phila-
delphia in new Plymouth about Aug.
5. Would like companion. Call 2-Q779
for information. )39T
WANTED TO BUY
GIRLS THREE SPEED English bike in
good condition. Phone 2-5267. )19W

of44c ________
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Continuous
Daily from 1 P.M.
Last Times Today AA.. A -2A
IPM

U,
t

L. G. BALFOUR CO.
FRATERNITY JEWELRY
CUPS AND TROPHIES
MICHIGAN SOUVENIRS
G I FTS
SUMMER STORE HOURS - 12:30 till 5:00
Closed Saturdays -
"Home of the official MichiganRings
0

I I
Starts Thursday

44~c to o:30. iv m
Monday Thru Friday
THE
ONCE-IN-A-BLUE-MOON
MUSICAL DELIGHT!

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9w A
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FOR
SECURITY
Carry
TRAVELER'S
1< CHECKS

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TONIGHT
Oh Suzannah
(in color)
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Quick Sand

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