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July 26, 1951 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-07-26

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THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE ' THREE

mm

Yanks

Squeeze

by

Tribe,

2

1

* * *

THIS IS MUSIC?
Dodger Symr-phonyStirs Union's Ire

By WHITNEY MARTIN
NEW YORK-()-It's all right
to call the Bums bums, but when
you start calling the Brooklyn
Dodger Sym-phony musicians mu-
sicians, well, that's carrying things
a little too far.
These musical rinky-dinks are
the center of a tempest in a tuba,
created when Local 802 of the Mu-
sician's Union threatened to picket1
Ebbet's Field unless an all-union'
s.

crew was hired to replace the semi-
pros at a fee of $100 a day.
* * *
S NOW EBBETS FIELD, as you
may have heard, is the home of
the Dodgers, and strange happen-
ings. Sights and sounds never seen
nor heard anywhere else amaze
and intrigue visitors.
Not the least of these strange
sights and sounds is provided by
the Dodger Sym-phony, a group
of alleged musicians togged out

Veeck's City Series Plan
Angers Cardinals' Saigh

ST. LOUIS-(A')-Bill Veeck has
touched off the fireworks for sure
in St. Louis and the noise and
smoke may last for a long time.
Owner Fred Saigh of the Cardi-
nals feels that one of Veeck's big-
gest firecrackers was tossed in his
direction. And he doesn't like it.
, UNLIKE THE flamboyant show-
man-owner of the Browns, Saigh
is a quiet and studious man who
offers baseball without the frills.
But Saigh's calm demeanor
was ruffled last Saturdaywhen
Veeck challenged the Cardinals
Fans To See
Seven Football
Games on TV
NEW YORK-(P)-Football fans
of .the television-watching variety
were assured yesterday that they
can see games on seven of ten big
Saturdays next fall.
The National Collegiate Athletic
Association television committee,
after a two-day session, named
the Westinghouse Electric Corpor-
ation of Pittsburgh as sponsor of
a ten-weeks program of experi-
mental "live" television.
* * *
IT WILL RUN from Sept. 22
through Nov. 24 and each geogra-
phical region of the United States
will be blacked out on three of the
ten Saturdays. The "Army-Navy
game on Dec. 1 will be televised as
in the past.
The games to be televised will
be selected by the sponsor on the
basis of a tentative schedule al-
ready drawn up. Since Westing-
house will negotiate with the in-
dividual colleges for each game,
no schedule was announced. Nei-
ther was it decided which network
or stations will carry the telecasts.

to a post-season city series, with
the proceeds to go to the Com-
munity Chest.
The explosive was cached in the
third paragraph of the written
challenge.
It read: "Since it now appears
that neither St. Louis team is go-
ing to be engaged in the World
Series this fall, it would seem that
here is an opportunity for us to
take part in this most important
drive."
* * *
SAIGH DOESN'T like the way
Veeck and his last-place Browns
counted the third-place Redbirds
out of the National League race.
In a letter yesterday to the
general chairman of the Com-
munity Chest here, Saigh said
the challenge was made to em-
barass the Cardinals-"For if
it was possible to play the
games, Mr. Veeck, a newcomer
to the city, would take full cre-
dit, and if they were not played,
the Cardinals would receive the
full blame."
Added Saigh: "Therefore it is
natural to assume that the only
thing Mr. Veeck has in mind is
the amount of publicity' that
would accrue first to him person-
ally and second to the Browns."
* * *
ASSERTING THAT he feels the
Cardinals (11 games off the pace)
still have a chance for the pen-
nant, Saigh declined Veeck's in-
vitation.
He recalled that on Aug. 9, 19-
42, the Cardinals were 10 games
behind; on September 4, 1934, six
games behind, and went on to win
World Championships.
L Saigh suggested instead that
% Veeck give the Community Chest
a check for $10,000 to be matched
by a similar check from the Car-
dinals.
"From past history. $20,000 is
considerably more than would be
netted from any game or post-
season series," the letter added.

in keepink with their music.
Loud, that is.
These rabid fans for years have
been adding to the festive atmos-
phere of the park, filling the air
with sounds which are a cross be-
tween the triumphant trumpeting
of a herd of bull elephants and the
plaintive wails of a treed cat, de-
pending on the progress of the
games.
"Let the Brooklyn Baseball
Club hire and pay union men,"
a union official said, "and we
guarantee to give Ebbets Field
a band that can play lousier
than the Dodger Sym-phony, if
that's what they want."
"We regard the Dodger Sym-
phony as a group of fans merely
expressing their joy at being alive
and being Dodger rooters," Walter
O'Malley, President of the Club,
retorted. "True, we let them in
free, but we don't pay them. Their
form of expression is music-well,
anyway, a noise from musical in-
struments."
* * *
"WE DIDN'T mean nothing,"
Lou Soriano, co-founder of the
Sym-phony 13 years ago, contri-
buted in a small, injured voice.
"We didn't want to hurt any un-
ion men. All we've been doing is
pep up Brooklyn games. We don't
even get free hot dogs."
The origin of the Sym-phony
was quite as impromptu as the
noises which emerge unexpect-
edly from the various instru-
ments. A bunch of fellows went
to a picnic 13 years ago with
their instruments. And were
rained out. The weather cleared,
so they went to Ebbets Field to
a ball game and put on a show.
That made them.
The ball club isn't exactly idle
during this controversy over who
called the piccolo player a bum or
who called the bum a piccolo play-
er.
It has designated Aug. 13 as
musical appreciation night at Eb-
betts Field, with the fans invited
to bring their own musical instru-
ments and play as they please.
If developments warrant, there
later will be an audition on the
City Hall steps to determine if
there is a worse band than the
Sym-phony, a rather hopeless
quest, some of the fans argue.
Major League
Standings

JOHN MIZE
... hits in clutch
Toledo Trio
Took Bribes
To .Rig Tilts
Hogan Reveals Fixers
Traveled with Braves
NEW YORK-(P)-The explod-
ing college basketball scandal en-
gulfed its sixth school yesterday
and turned up an amazing story
of a "double cross" among gamb-
lers involving a death threat to
one of them.
District Attorney Frank S. Ho-
gan reported that three stars of
the University of Toledo's crack
team admitted taking money to
rig the points in a game with Ni-
agara at Toledo last December. *
The District Attorny said the
three Toledo players, William
Walker of Toledo, Robert Mc-
Donald of New York, and Carlo
Muzi of Akron, told the grand
jury how they kept their win-
ning margin to only three points
in beating Niagara, 73-70, in
Toledo on Dec. 14, 1950.
Hogan, in stressing the cooper-
ation of the three players, made
it clear there are no charges
against them. There had been no
law against bribing amateur ath-
letes in Ohio, but starting Aug.
22 it will be punishable by a $10,-
000 fine or a prison sentence of
one to five years, or both.
IN RELATING the fantastic
story of the "double cross" in the
Bradley-St. Joseph's game at Phil-
adelphia's Convention Hall early
in 1950, Hogan said one of the
alleged fixers travelled in the
same Pullman berth with Melchi-
orre.
According to Hogan, Kaye and
the Englisis brothers, Nicholas
(Nick the Greek) and Tony,
worked together to fix the Brad-
ley players.
Nick travelled with the Bradley
team, said Hogan, who reported
the following series of events:
The battle of wits between the
gamblers developed when Jack
West, a convicted New York book-
maker who is being sought by Ho-
gan, got together with Nick Eng-
lisis to get information on the
Bradley-St. Joseph's game.
* * *
WEST, A onetime associate of
the notorious racketeer Marty
Krompier, was to pay Nick $1,000
for information on the Bradley
score. This separate deal was un-
known to Kaye.
It turned out that Bradley won,
64-60. Thus, with a point spot of
six or seven, those who got on St.
Joseph's won their bets. ,
A few hours before the deal was
made, the gambling books were
flooded with wagers on St. -Jo-
seph's and the prosecutor said that
West evidently bet a lot of money.
Kaye told Nick Englisis, accord-
ing to Hogan, that "There must
be a double-cross and we will have
to switch our bets."
Hogan said Kaye then instruct-
ed the players to win over the
spread, and, after they agreed,
Nick again relayed this informa-
tion to West. West and his associ-
ates protested they had their bets
down and couldn't switch, said
Hogan, citing the story told by the
Englisis brothers.
Hogan said West and two asso-
ciates then grabbed Tony Englisis
and brought him to West's apart-

ment in Brooklyn.
"Tony thought he was going to
get killed," said Hogan.
Tony telephoned Convention
Hall, had his brother paged, and
told him his life was threatened,
said Hogan.

Mize Double
Wins in 9th;
Bosox Lose
Senators, Coani
Top Tigers, 7-4
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - The Cleveland
Indians came within one out of
winning their first game at the
Yankee Stadium in over a year
yesterday, but a two-out, ninth
inning double by Johnny Mize
scored two runs, wrecked the In-
dians for the 13th straaight time
here and gave the New York Yan-
kees a thrilling 2-1 triumph.
Mike Garcia, heavyweight In-
dian righthander, had surrender-
ed only four singles and was work-
ing on his second straight shutout
as the Yanks came up for the last
time. The Tribe had manufactur-
ed their lone run in the first in-
ing on two hits and two outs off
Eddie Lopat.
GIL McDOUGALD, however, op-
ened the last of the ninth with a
line single to center. Garcia quick-
ly disposed of the next two batters,
striking out Gene Woodling and
getting Joe DiMaggio on a fly to
right. It looked like the finish.
Larry Berra kept the Yankee
hopes alive with a single to cen-
ter that sent McDougald to third.
Mize, whose eighth inning ho-
mer beat Cleveland 3-2 Tuesday,
worked the count to one and
one, then sliced a hump-backed
hit over third. Berra followed
McDougald across the plate with
the winning run.
Easy throwing Ken Holcombe
turned up as the Chicago White
Sox's eagerly sought "stopper,"
and his artistic five-hit pitching
stint provided a 6-2 victory over
the Boston Red Sox.
The effective righthander faced
only 32 Bostonians while snapping
his fourth-place club's five game
losing streak.
BUT HOLCOMBE owed much
to Don Lenhardt, who belted his
second three-run homer here in
two days against Lefty Mel Par-
nell in the sixth inning.
A 14-hit attack by the Wash-
ington Senators, highlighted by
a triple and three singles by Gil
Coan, blasted four Detroit Tiger
pitchers for a 7-4 Washington
victory.
The Tigers hammered D o n
Johnsoi for three runs in the
first inning but he braced to post
his sixth victory. Freddie Hutch-
inson, smashed for two runs in
the second inning and two more
in the third, was charged with the
defeat, his sixth against eight
wins.
THE FRONT-RUNNING Brook-
lyn Dodgers pushed their latest
winning streak to five games as
Preacher Roe pitched his 14th vic-
tory and 12th complete game in
defeating the Chicago Cubs 6 to
2, before 17,889.
Roe, the National League's
winningest pitcher, g a v e up
eight hits, but walked only one
and fanned six, while his mates
made the most of four Cub er-
rors and seven hits off starter
Bob Rush and his successor,
Walt Dubiel.
Catcher Joe Garagiola's eighth
home run of the year with two
aboard in the seventh inning help-
ed the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 5
to 4 victory over the New York Gi-
ants.
George Strickland's long fly ball
in the eighth with the bases load-
ed scored Pete Reiser with the

winning run.
*. * 4'
RIGHTHANDER Ned Garver
chalked up his 13th victory in 18
decisions as the St. Louis Browns
pushed over a tally in the ninth
inning to take a 5 to 4 win over
the Philadelphia Athletics. It was
Garver's tenth consecutive win in
three years over the A's.
The winning counter resulted
from rookie shortstop Bill Jen-
nings' single, a sacrifice by Gar-
ver, a hit by Bob Young and Jim
Delsing's outfield fly.
Garver has beaten Philadelphia
three times this year.
The loser was reliever Carl
Scheib who suffered his eleventh
setback.
Del Wilber's home run, Granny
Hamner's double and Robin Rob-
erts' four-hit pitching were too
much for the St. Louis Cardinals
as the Philadelphia Phillies took
a 2 to 0 decision from the Red-
birds.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays'
11:30 A.M. for Sgnday Issue.
FOR SALE
1940 BUICK SPECIAL 2-door sedan to
highest bidder. 1004 Olivia after 3
p.m. Ph. 2-2443. )162
BARGAIN DAYS
Men's Wear
Seersucker Pants -..............$2.00
Rayon Dress Pants.............$2.00
Sandals .......................$2.00
White "Hankies" 9c ea.... doz. $1.00
Short Sleeve Sport Shirts ......$1.35
100% Wool Swim Trunks ..... $1.00
Brief Style Swim Trunks ......$1.66
Terry Cloth Sweaters,
yellow, white............... $1.77
Hanes "T" Shirts, whites, colors. .89c
3 for $2.50
Other Items On Sale Not Advertised
Open 'til 6 p.m. Sam's Store, 122 E.
Washington. )163
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS Tourist Home. Rooms by Day
or Week. Bath, Shower. Television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )1R

ROOMS FOR RENT
SHARE APARTMENT with Grad Stu-
dent. Save on meals. $8 week. Big
yard, continuous hot water. Call
31791 )80R
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD AT FRATERNITY HOUSE -
Short block from Law Quad, corner
Hillrand Oakland. Eating schedule at
your convenience. Really good food.
Ph. 2-1634. )3X
MISCELLANEOUS
I KNOW that I am I because I received
my copy of Time today which I bought
through the Student Periodical Agency
at the special price of $3 a year by
phoning 2-8242. )16M
AT LIBERTY-German 11 and 12 in-
structor does tutoring and translation.
A. R. Neumann. 2-7909. )14M
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING DONE-Call A.A. 7365 between
8:30 and 5:00. )42B
DOCTORAL CANDIDATE desires in-
tensive tutoring in French translation
during August-September. Wishes to
contact tutoress with good background
in French written language. Phone
2-4431, Room 219. n)41B
TYPING WANT9D-To do in my home.
Experienced. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
)40B
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. We spe-
cialize in doing summer dresses.

HELP WANTED
STORE CLERK for Saturdays for Men's
Furnishing and Shoe Store. Prefer ex-
perienced man. Apply Sam's Store,
122 E. Washington St. )60H
WANTED BOOKKEEPER -- Be able to
take a trial balance. Job open now.
Apply in person. WOODS MANUFAC-
TURING CO., 2175 Stadium Blvd. )59H
PERSONAL
BE SURE TO SEE the Obedience Exh-
bition at the HURAN HILLS KENNEL
CLUB'S DOG SHOW to be held all day
Sunday at Yost Field House. 400 dogs
from 11 states and Canada will be on
display. )61P
Read Daily Classifieds

"Why can't he wait until we get
to the beach?"

U _______________

STARTING TODAY
Thru Saturday

r--a

V

I

Continuous 4
Doily from 1 P.M.
.. ... ...a 6:30 PAL
STARTS TODAY:
AVALANCHING FROM THETOP OF THE ADVENTURE WORLD!
KIRK VIRGINIA JOHN WALTER
DOUG LAS AMAYO -AGAR BRENNAN
ARNER BROS. T
AlONGti GEATDIVIDE
Extra Added
CSKY WORLD
"PILGRIM SKIERS NEWS
j POPE YE" SIES1EW

AMERICAN
W
New York .... 55
Boston .... 55
Cleveland ...54
Chicago. 54
Detroit........40
Washington .. 41
Philadelphia . 36
St. Louis .... 28

LEAGUE
L Pct.
34 .618
36 .604
37 .593
40 .574
47 .460
50 .451
57 .387
62 .311

GB
1'
2
3
14
15
21
27%

TODAY'S GAMES

Cleveland at New York-Feller (14-
3) vs. Reynolds (11-5).
Chicago at Boston-Dobson (6-3) vs.
Nixon (6-2).
Detroit at Washington-Gray (3-10)
or Trucks (4-3) vs. Hudson (3-6).
St. Louis at Philadelphia-(N)-
Pillette (4-9) vs. Martin (6-1).
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 2, Cleveland 1.
Chicago 6, Boston 2.
Washington 7, Detroit 4.
St. Louis 5, Philadelphia 4.
(Only gam he ed).
A* *U
NATIONAL LEAGUE

I

"CITY OF BALL TOSSERS"
"MUSICAL MEMORIES"
GAY '90's

Brooklyn ....
New York ....
St. Louis .
Philadelphia
Cincinnati ...
Boston .......
Chicago.
Pittsburgh .

W
58
51
45
45
43
42
36
36

L
32
43
43
46
45
45
47
55

Pct.
.644
.543
.511
.495
.489
.483
.434
.396

GB
9
12
1311
14
14%
18 %z

c (Tax Incl.) NEWS -- CARTOON
"ROMANTIC RIVIERA"
TRAVEL

I.

Coming
Sunday!

STEPHAN McNALLY
"APACHE DRUMS"

o+wowswo

a

SALE CONTINUES
Thru Friday and Saturday
30% Off on Unmatched Clubs
20% Off on Matched Sets,
Accessories, Carts and Bags
20% Off on All Fishing Tackle
20% Off on all Baseball Equipment
... Bats, Shoes, and Gloves
Also On Picnic Equipment

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Brooklyn 6, Chicago 2.
Pittsburgh 5, New York 4.
Philadelphia 2, St. Louis 0.
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Chicago-Newcombe (13
-4) vs. Lown (2-5).
Boston at Cincnnati--Bickford (10-
7) vs. Blackwell (9-0).
Philadelphia at St. Louis (N)-Po-
holsky (4-8) or Staley (12-9) vs. John-
son (1-1) or Thompson(3-6).
(Only games scheduled).
I-

A Limited Number

Classical Records

Ends Tonight
SO YOUNG SO BAD
Paul Henreid
BELLE LE GRAND
Vera Ralston
John Carroll

A

Serving Quality Food

a

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