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July 26, 1951 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-07-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

PAGE TOtTR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1951

t

Dean Robertson Visits Camp McCoy

PI

W

NEWS

I

MATCHIN C MATCHSTICKS- Hobbyist G. W.
Sweetman of San Francisco uses crayon-pencil to put finishing
touches to reproduction of Texas Alamo, made of matchsticks.

F A I R W A R N I N G - Structure, publicizing the use of
aluminum in building, is one of the features of first postwar Ger-
man construction fair, "Constructs," which opened in Hannover.

ROTC SUMMER TRAINING-James H. Robertson, assistant dean o f the literary college, gets the latest word on medium tanks from
University students on a recent visit to the 'U' ROTC summer infantry regiment, training at Camp McCoy, Wis. Pictured with Robert-
son, who is at the extreme right, are (left to tight) Harold Keas, Ja mes McNally, Harry Tyson, and Murray Lyon.

I

Astronomer
Will Lecture
On Universe
Prof. Gerard P. Kuiper of the
Yerkes Observatory is conducting
a series of lectures on the stabil-
ity of the solar system and its ori-
gin at the University observatory.
The lectures are held at 2 p.m.
Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
They will continue for the next
three weeks.
h Prof. Kuiper, who has published
a theory on the origin of the-
earth and the planets, was the
first man to discover the univer-
se's super-dense "white dwarf"
stars, which have a density 100
million times that of water.
And his discovery in 1947 of
carbon dioxide in the atmosphere
of Mars established a similarity
with the Earth's atmosphere and
led to renewed speculation about
the possibility of human life on
Mars.
His work at the McDonald Ob-
servatory in Mount Locke, Texas
during 1948 led to the discovery
of a faint satellite of the planet
Uranus and of a satellite of Nep-
tune.
In 1949 Prof. Kuiper resigned as
director of the Yerkes Observatory
in order to carry out research on.
the origin of the solar system with
the help of the big 200 inch tele-
scope at Mount Palomar, Califor-
nia.
Prof. Kuiper will also lecture on
"The Planets" at 8:30 p.m. to-
morrow in 1025 Angell Hall.
LADIESI
Let us cut and style
your hair..--
to please you
- No Appointments --
The Dascola Barbers
Liberty off State

MEMORIES OF MICHIGANIA:
Relics of University's Early Detroit Days
Featured in Historical Display at Rackham

4

A local feature of Detroit's 250th
birthday celebration is the exhibit
of relics from the University's
early days in Detroit now on dis-
play in the Michigan Historical
Collections at the Rackham Bldg.
T h e exhibit includes photo-

graphs, photostats of original rec-
ords about the University, letters
and other items of interest.
* > *
ACCORDING TO these docu-
ments, the University of Michi-
gania was established by the law

Mud Raises Settled SidewalkI
In Front of Bus Ad. Building

Mud---two and one-half yards
of it-has been forced under the
concrete apron in front of the
Business Administration Bldg. to
raise the apron to its correct level.
Plant department employees us-
Student Driver
HearingSet
William G. Reeder, Grad., one
of two drivers involved in an acci-
dent in which an Ann Arbor wo-
man was seriously injured, was
released on $300 bond, which was
posted in circuit court yesterday,
pending an Aug. 6 court appear-
ance where he will answer to a
felonious driving charge.
The accident in which Mrs.
Katie R. Staebler was injured oc-
curred Saturday.
Mrs. Staebler, 75 years old, was
waiting for a bus at Crest St. and
W. Washington St. when Reeder's
car and a vehicle driven by Mal-
colm Boucher collided. One of the
cars plunged over the curb and
overturned trapping Mrs. Staeb-
ler beneath it.
She was "coming along very
well" yesterday according to a
physician at St. Joseph's Mercy
Hospital. "However, it is still too
early to tell for certain whether
amputation of her injured legs
will be necessary.

ed a newly acquired mudjack, a
steel bin and an attached pump-
ing apparatus, for the job.
They explained that settling of
concrete is a common occurence
and it can only be eliminated if
the concrete is poured below the
frost line, which is three and one-
half feet below the ground sur-
face in Ann Arbor.
The job at the Business Admin-
istration Building was small com-
pared to many similar projects,
they said. The concrete slab in
front of Hill Auditorium was rais-
ed three and one-half inches ear-
lier this year.
The plant department is now
experimenting with a silicone
treatment of building materials
which manufacturers claim will
prevent concrete and stone from
absorbing water thus reducing the
damaging action of frost.
Prince's Trial

of the governor and judges of the
Michigan Territory on Aug. 26,
1817. Judge Augustus Woodward
was the author of the law.
On April 30, 1821 another law
was adopted changing the name
of the school from Michigania
to the University of Michigan.
At the same time, control was
placed in a board of 21 trustees.
The University remained in De-
troit from 1817 until 1837 when
the Board of Trustees held their
last meeting and turned the build-
ing and other property over to
the new Board of Regents which
had been given authority over the
University in its new location, Ann
Arbor.
The records of those early
days of the University in Detroit
are on exhibit in bound volumes.
Photostats of the acts launching
the educational venture are in-
cluded.
Today the Rackham Educational
Memorial in Detroit is the only
part of the University that remains
in the city of its founding.
TU' Professors
Publish Book
A book on "Business Theory for
Secretaries," which can be used as
a classroom text or for home
study, has just been published by
six faculty members of the busi-
ness administration school.
Sections in the book include sur-
vey banking, finance, investments,
business organization and man-'
agement, law, accounting, office
procedures, statistical analysis and
presentation.
The authors are Prof. Gerald O.
Dykstra, Prof. Wilford Eiteman,
William M. Hoad, Prof. Irene
Place, Prof. Leo Schmidt and Prof.
Eugene Yehle.
'UT' Scientists Will
Visit Air Centers
Russel O'Neal, director of the
Willow Run Research Center, and
Harry Good, chief project engi-
neer at the Center, have left on a
two-week trip to England where
they will visit aircraft and missile
development centers.
Under the auspices of the U.S.
Air Force, the researchers plan to
exchange information and ideas
with leading British scientists in
the field.

N OW I T' S S A N D P L A N I N C - On home-made sled teen-agers sandplane along Southampton, N. Y., beach. New sport
is second cousin to snow-sledding and aquaplaning. Terry Maloney drives jeep pulling Mimi Conklin and Paula Hasselberger.'

4

EVENING TWEEDS
-A nubby tweed dinner jacket,
collared in black satin, was de-
signed by Austin, New Yo"k,'as
a change for at-home entertain.)
ing, cruise or resort wear.

Set for Aug.

7

OUT TO SETTLE B U R N I N G QUESTION -Autos of yesteryear, 1911 Stod-
dard-Dayton (left) and 1913 Stanley Steamer will race between Chicago and New York to settle
a burning question of grandfather's day: Is steam nower more efficient than gasoline engine?

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

The municipal court trial of
Prince Mahmoud Pahlavi, Grad.,
charged with driving with a re-
voked license, will be held on
August 7, a court clerk said yes-
terday.
This, the second postponement
granted to Pahlavi, was requested
so that Prosecuting Attorney,
Douglas K. Reading might attend
a convention of Michigan prose-
cutors on the originally scheduled
date, July 26.
Conviction calls for a mandatory
two-day jail sentence. According
to local legal authorities the prince
has no diplomatic immunity and
this leaves the prerogative of re-
questing a suspension of sentence
in the hands of the Prosecuting
Attorney.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

s1

ti

HEAR THEM AS THEY REALLY
SOUND WITH . . . w~EBSTER ELECIR
Frdm the unsure fingers of the stu- t
dent to the crashing crescendo of
the artist, Ekotape records every RECORDER-REPRODUCER

1~1

note exactly as it is played. You'll
be amazed at the fidelity of repro-
A...4:... .mae andsaved on Eo

L. G. BALFOUR CO.

Isms

4 1

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