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July 01, 1950 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-07-01

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SATURDAY, JULY 1, 1950 l

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

aaus

Philadelphia Beats Dodgers,8-

--<

* A

* * *

* . *

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.

FOR RENT
SUITES FOR COUPLES-Airy, cooking
privileges soon. 325 E. Jefferson. )5R
FOUR ROOM basement apartmentnto
rent furnished till Sept. 1st only.
927 Forest. )3_______
MODERN, QUIET unfurnished apart-
ment near Stadium. Suitable for one
or two adults. Ph. 6197 after 5:30. )2

PERSONAL
THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
did not burn down. You can still get
your special rates by calling 2-8242. )2

0. l

BUSINESS
SERVICES

cL~osETr

ROOMS
FOR RENT

LOST & FOUND
LOST--Gold trimmed Waterman pen.
L. Brooks, 515 Church, Ph. 6609. )42
* LOST - On Friday in Williams St.
Laundromat-Goldring with Chinese
* letters. Extremely anxious to have it
returned. Reward. Ph. Jose Bornn,
Music School )2
FOR SALE
FOR SALE OR RENT-Fraternity or
Sorority house. Will house 35 people.
'East ofcampus. Ph. 2-0567. A.L.
.McDonald, Broker. ) 13
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS, 2 for
$3.00; Nay "T" Shirts-45c; wash pants
-$299; wool swim trunks-$1.49. Open
'til 6 p.m. Sams Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington. )5
Cousins on State Street
Featuring Genuine LEVI'S - $3.95
Companion Plaid Levi Shirts
$2.95 and $3.95 )3
~ I WE REPAIR
Nam' ,h ALL.
r. a r~i3 . MUSICAL
I UMENT '
u 1 x
"You'll have to rush it up, joe,
if you want to have dinner at
the Allenel Dining Room with
me!"
THE ALLENEL
126 East Huron
*f

UNFURNISHED APARTMENT-2 rooms
until Sept. 1, near campus, reason-
able. Call Jim Wright, 2-9431. )18F
TWIN BED STUDY ROOM !or men.
Private bath, near campus. inside
entrance. Ph. 2-0519 after 6. )16F
ATTRACTIVE ROOM-Private lavatory
and toilet, for professional or busi-
ness man. Private home in Washte-
naw area. Ph. 2-3868. )15F
SINGLE FOR MEN - Near campus.
Shower, use of refrigerator, $4 per
week. Ph. 5750. -_)14F
ARE YOU LOOKING for a large, nicely
furnished, cool, comfortable. room
for summer? Ph. 3-1937. )17F
THREE DOUBLE ROOMS for Fail. Very
close to campus $4, $4.50, $5.50 per
week. 412 Camden Court, Phone 7673.
)12
PERSONAL
DAY NURSERY
Individual attention in private home.
Ph. 6378 )16P
IF THE GIRL to whom I pointed out1
the rear door to Angell Hall last
week, the one who was a little an-
noyed at displaying unfamiliarity with
the campus, would like to see a few
other places in and around Ann Ar-
bor, I'd like the occupation of show-
ing her. Box 223. )15P
WANTED - Men to eat in fraternity
house this summer. 1319 Cambridge
Rd. Rates very reasonable. Ph. 2-8312.
) 14
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist, at
308 S. State. Legal, Masters, Doctors
dissertations, etc. Call 2-2615 or
2-9848. )13
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161 )1P
KIDDIE KARE-Reliable baby sitters.
Ph. 3-1121. )10B
FRATERNITY "
JEWELRY 0
SOUVENIRS -GIFTS
TRADITIONAL MUGS
DIAMONDS - WATCHES O
CUPS --TROPHIES "
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
0L. 1319 S. University y
c "Home of the
Official Michigan Ring"
Summer Hours, ten till five;O
n^ closed Saturdays.
$04-.,.0..... 0 -,.4-,04-.

ALL COLORED BABY PARAKEETS and
Canaries. Bird supplies and cages.
562 Seventh, Ph. 5330. )2B
WASHING-Finish work and ironing
also. Rough dry and wet washing.
Free pick up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020.
1B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPE-109 E. Wash-
ington. Custom Clothes and Altera-
tions. )3B
THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
offers special rates to STUDENTS and
FACULTY members for TIME, LIFE
and other magazines. Phone 2-8242.
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company,
215 E. Liberty. )
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales & Service
MORRILLS-314 S. State St. )4B
ROOM and BOARD
WOMEN STUDENTS - PERSONNEL -
Meals served Mon. thru. Fri., 119 Park
Terrace on Felch Park near Rackham.
Call 2-1017 8-noon or 4-6 p.m. )3X
BOARD FOR LESS than $7.00 per week.
Rooming vacancies also available.
Apply at Robt. Owen Co-op House.
1017 Oakland. Ph. 7211.C)H e
WANTED TO RENT
HOUSE FOR MEDICAL FRATERNITY-
Full year occupancy. Preferably near
Hospital. Call Dr. Jacobson 2-9460. )1N
WANTED
RIDERS WHO LIKE GOOD HORSES-
Only good riders and those desiring
to learn need apply. -Glencoe Hills
Riding Stable. 4255 Washtenaw, Ph.
28834. ) lA
U.S. Runners
Beat Finnish
At Helsinki
HELSINKI-(P)-P a c e d b y
John Twomey of the Illinois A. C.
who scored an upset victory in
the 1,500 meter run, a U.S. track
and field team won eight out of
nine events from Finnish athletes
today in Helsinki Stadium.
Yesterday, Uncle Sam's track
and fieldsters swept all nine events
from the Finns.
* * *
RUNNING in a drizzling rain,
Twomey, the U.S. 1,500 meter
champion, beat both of Finland's
favorites, J. Taipale and D. Jo-
hansson, in 3:53.2.
The only American loser of
the day was Jack Razzetto, the
San Diego State high jumper.
He leaped 6 feet 2% inches but
was lieaten by the Finnish ace,
K. Nicklen, who scored 6 feet
4 inches.
One of the highspots of yes-
terday's sweep was a Finnish rec-
ord 13,9 performance by Dick At-
tlesey in winning the 110-meter
high hurdles. The Southern Cal-
ifornian's time was the best ever
made for the event in Finland.
Baseball's
Big Six
By The Associated Press
LEADING BATSMEN

All-Star Poll
StopsTonite
CHICAGO -(P) - The National
All-Star Poll to determine the
starting lineups selected by the
fans for the American and Nation-
al Leagues 17th annual interleague
game at Chicago's Comiskey Park
July 11 roars to a climax tonight.
Promptly at midnight the ballot
boxes will be sealed in 288 cen-
ters, representing newspapers and
radio stations in 47 states, district
of Columbia, Hawaii and Puerto
Rico. Final returns in the ballot-
ing will be announced for Monday
morning newspapers.
* * *
THE 11TH HOUR returns will
decide the issue on some hotly
contested spots in both leagues.
Phil Rizzuto, a top flight ma-
jor leaguer with the New York
Yankees since 1941, but never a
participant.in an all-star game,
probably will start at short. He
leads Vern Stephens of the Bos-
ton Red Sox by 19,251 votes,
polling 706,352 to 687,101 for
Stephens.
Larry "Yogi" Berra, Yankee
catcher, has a wider margin over
another Red Sox veteran, Birdie
Tebbetts. Berra leads Tebbetts by
51,177' votes. Phil Masi, Chicago
White Sox, is third on voting
strength mainly in the Chicago
area.
Detroit's George Kell clings to
his lead as the poll's highest indi-
vidual vote getter with 918,457.
Big Ten Golfer
Wins Way to
NCAAFinals
ALBUQUERQUE, N. M.-(P)-
Fred Wampler, Big Ten champ
from Purdue, and Bob McCall of
Colgate won their way into an all-
eastern final in the NCAA golf
tournament today.
Overcoming his opponent's early
advantage, Wampler defeated Billy
Maxwell, North Texas State sharp-
shooter, 3 and 1 - partly thanks
to sporting gestures by which the
Texan conceded two holes.
The long-driving McCall wal-
loped Wake Forest's Ray Harris
out of competition, 5 and 4.
Upset Yanks
At Wimbledon
WIMBLEDON, England-(I)-
Frank Sedgman and Ken Mc-
Gregor, two of Australia's young
Davis Cup hopefuls, pulled the
biggest upset of the All-England
Lawn Tennis Championships to-
day when they eliminated the top-
seeded American doubles team of
Gardner Mulloy and Bill Talbert,
8-6, 8-6, 8-10, 10-8.
It remained for the women to
uphold the United States' pres-
tige in today's matches. Nine
American girls gained the round
of 16, including defending cham-
pion Louise Brough of Beverly
Hills, Calif., Mrs. Margaret Os-
borne DuPont, national champion
of Wilmington, Del., Mrs. Patt
Todd of La Jolla; California, Shir-
ly Fry of Akron, O., and Doris
Hart of Jacksonville, Fla.

PHILADELPHIA - (A) - The
Philadelphia Phillies pounded out
four runs in the eigth inning last
night to defeat the Broollyn Dod-
gers 8 to 5 and take over first
place in the National League.
Willie Jones started the Phils'
rally with a single. Dick Sisler
walked and Andy Seminick singled
to score Jones. Mike Goliat bounc-
ed a single off Don Newcombe's
shins to load the bases and Jim
Bloodworth, batting for Jim Kon-
stanty, doubled to score Ralph
Caballero, who ran for Sisler, and
Seminick and Goliat.
* * *
IT WAS a close game from the
start. Goliat's double against the
left field wall and Richie Ash-
burn's short single to center gave
the Phils a run in the third.
The whiz kids raised their
lead in the fourth when Jones
walked, stole second and went
to third on Roy Campanella's
wild throw. Sisler's single to
right brought Jones home.
Brooklyn got one of the runs
back in the fifth when Gil Hodges
singled and Pee Wee Reese was
safe on Gran Hamner's error.
Newcombe walked. Billy Cox hit
into a double play and Hodges
scored.
The Phils rebounded with two
in their half of the fifth. Goliat
hit his sixth homer, Hamner dou-
bled, scoring on Eddie Waitkus'
single.
Hodges hit his ninth homer with
one out in the eighth to put the
Dodgers out in front 5-4 before
the Phillies opened their rally
which carried them to victory and
the top spot in the National Lea-
gue.
* * *
INDIANS 11, TIGERS 3
CLEVELAND-(P)-The Cleve-
land Indians scored seven times
in the second inning on five hits
and five walks off Detroit pitchers
Hal Newhouser and Paul Trout
last night and went on to win,
11-3. Luke Easter hit two home
runs and Al Rosen slugged one
four-bagger for the Tribe.
Cleveland's 14th win in 17 games
was before 50,882 and opened an
important four-game series with
the league leaders.
PITCHER Mike Garcia gave up
five hits in picking up his sixth
victory of the season and his fifth
win in a row.
Newhouser was chased in the
second after giving up three
walks and two singles. It was
his third straight loss.
Easter's 13th and 14th home
runs accounted for four Indian
runs in the first two panels. Ro-
sen's 21st homer came in the
eighth after Doby had singled.
Vic Wertz' eighth inning double
scored two Detroit runs and Don
Kolloway's double scored Aaron
Robinson with the other in the
seventh.
Larry Doby went bat-in-hand
after Trout after being sent
sprawling to the dirt in the sec-
ond by a close pitch. Players from
both clubs poured onto the field
but umpires quieted the fuss be-
fore any fists were thrown.
* * *.
BOSTON-G')-The Boston Red
Sox rebounded for new manager
Steve O'Neill by defeating the New
York Yankees 10-2 last night.
A few hours earlier they drop-
ped a day game to the World

Champions 9-6, making their first'
stumble in eight games under
O'Neill's direction.
Homers by Walt Dropo, his 17th,
Dom DiMaggio and Matt Batts
were among the Sockers' dozen
floodlight hits. Joe DiMaggio poled
his 16th four-bagger for the Yanks'
final tally against Walt Masterson
in the eighth inning.
A crowd of 16,970 turned out
to welcome Boston's new manager,
Steve O'Neill, but it was a sour
inaugural for the smiling Irish-
man from Minooka, Pa. He saw
the Red Sox's seven-game win-
ning streak, constructed under
his leadership, smashed to bits.
Cliff Mapes stroked the decid-
ing blow, a two-run single in the
eighth inning to put the New
Yorkers ahead, 7-6.
Joe DiMaggion, who had three
hits, scored Mapes with a single
to center. The Yankee Clipper
tallied on Hank Bauer's third
safety, a single to left, to wrap
up the Yanks' sixth victory against
Boston this season. They've lost
twice to the Sox.
'p * *
ATHLETICS 7-4, SENATORS, 6-2
WASHINGTON - (P) - Phila-
delphia moved out of the Ameri-
can League basement last night by
taking both games of a double-
header from Washington, 7-6 and
4-2.
Eddie Joost's eighth inning ho-
mer with Ferris Fain aboard,
broke a 2-2 tie to give Alex Kell-
ner his fifth victory in the night-
cap.
The A's twice came from behind
to win the first game for Hank
Wy e, who required relief by Lou
Brissie. They battered Connie
Marrero for four runs in the fourth
inning, then clipped him for three
runs in the sixth after Washing-
ton had hammered Wyse for tree
runs in the first inning and three
in the fifth.
Mike Guerra led Philadelhia's
11 hit attack in the opener while
Joe Astroth got three of the A's
11 hits off Sandalio Consuegra in
the second game.
BRAVES 8, GIANTS 4
NEW YORK-(P)-Pinch-hitter
Sibby Sisti belted a grand slam
home run in the ninth inning last
night to break a tie and give the
Boston Braves an 8-4 triumph
over the New York Giants.
The blow was Sisti's first homer
of the season and "vas yielded by
lefty Dave Koslo who relieved
Sheldon Jones after the right-
hander had loaded the bases with
walks.
* * 4'
EIGHTEEN walks were issued,
nine by each side.
The Braves got away to a.
three run lead in the first in-
ning sparked by arl Torgeson's
two-run homer. Three singles
gave them another run in the
fifth.
Starter Bob Hall, who had been
pitching one-hit ball, weakened in

ti "'

Indians Tame Tiger Pitchers, 11-3

the sixth as the Giants sandwiched
three hit, around three walks to
score thrice. In the seventh, two
walks and a single by Monte Ir-
vin tied the score.
Jones, coming on in the ninth,
walked Hartsfield, the first bat-
ter to face him. Sam Jethroe flied
out, but Torgeson and Bob Elliott
also walked to fill the bases. Kos-
lo replaced Jones and Sisti, bat-
ting for Johnson, then connected
for his grand-slammer.
* * 4
REDS 8, CUBS 5
CINCINNATI-( P)-The Cincin-
nati Reds scooted to a four-run
margin in the first inning and
then threw back three Chicago
Cubs' rallies to win 8-5 tonight.
Phil Cavarretta and Hank Sauer
hit successive home runs with
none on for Chicago in the fourth.
Kenny Raffensberger wilted in
the eighth and was yanked for
Herm Wehmeier, but was given
credit for his sixth win.
A double, an error and a hit
batsman filled the bases for the
Reds in the first and then terrible
Ted Kluszewski cleared the decks
with a double. Ted rod home on a
Connie Ryan single.
The two Chicago homers made
it 4-2 in the fourth. The Redlegs,
however, stretched their lead to
8-2 with two two-run upsurges in
the fifth and seventh.
A walk, a triple and a single
brought in two more runs for the
Bruins in the eighth and they add-
ed a final marker on three singlese
in the ninth.
WHITE SOX 3, BROWNS 2
CHICAGO--()-G u s Zernial
hit his no. 12 home run of the
season into the left field second
deck with two out in the thir-
teenth inning to give the Chicago
White Sox a 3-2 victory over the
St. Louis Browns before 12,190
persons here last night.
Ned Garver pitched the dis-
tance on a yield of 10 hits to wind
up with his seventh loss as Luis
Aloma, third White Sox pitcher,
gained his second triumph after
one inning of relief pitching.
CARDS 9, PIRATES 4
ST. LOUIS- ()-Opening a
home stand, the St. Louis Cardin-
als broke out of their batting
slump and mauled the Pittsbcrgh
Pirates 9-4 before 12,631 spectators
last night.
The triumph moved the Cards
into second place, a few percent-
age points behind the leading Phil-
adelphia Phils. Stan Musial slam-

Rickey Hits
'LVielyBal'
By WILL GRIMSLEY
NEW YORK-(P)-Mr. Rickey
raised his eyebrows - and if
you're on friendly terms with Mr.
Rickey's eyebrows you know that
is an engineering feat of im-
mense proportions.
"Pitching," he said in a deep,
reflectfve tone, "has become one
of the most hazardous of all pro-
fessions. Honestly, I'm afraid
somebody is going to get killed
out there."
BROOKLYN'S major domo bit
off the end of a dry cigar, jam-
med the remnants between his
teeth and insisted he wasn't ex-
aggerating.
"Why," he exclaimed, "t's
much more dangerous to be a
pitcher these days than a bat-
ter. That ball comes off the bat
like a rocket."
If you get the impression that
Branch Rickey, who must have
sneaked into line twice when they
were passing out baseball brains,
is not pleased with the resiliency
of the 1950 major league nugget,
you are only halfway there.
"SOMETHING has to be done
about it," he added. "Yes, sir.
We don't need to deaden it, mind
you - just take out a little pinh
of that dynamite. A little pinch."
Removing the lethal qualities
from the present-day baseliall is
just one of the pet current pro-
jects of this bushy-browed,
restless pioneer of the diamond
sport - father of the sprawling
farm systems and wrecker of
baseball's Jim Grow.
Other changes he'd like to see
to bring the national pastime into
what he would consider near-per
fect balance are:
1. Get rid of the high school
rule, forbidding clubs to tamper
with players still in school or
whose original class hasn't gradu-
ated.
2. Eliminate the bonus rule,
which prevents a team from
farming out without losing orti
waivers any free agent signed
for over $6,000.
3. Strictest enforcement of the
balk rule.
"The ball - you can play hand-
ball with it - is the source of
some of our other growing pains
- s u c h a s long-, drawn-out
games," he said, leaning back pre-
cariously in the brown swivel chair
of his fourth floor executive office
at 215 Montague.
"Nearly four hours we played
against Pittsburgh last Saturday
night and the curfew caught us
in the eighth inning. Do the fans
want extravaganzas like that? I
doubt it.
The Dodgers president said he
probably is alone among major
league directors in opposing the
high school rule. His reason: "The
probable impossiblitly of enforce-
ment."

COOL!

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

- Lost Times Today -
PAUL
DOUGLAS
Jean Peters
Joan Davis
Keenan Wynn P
Cesar Romero p
- Coming Sunday -
'NEff ..:
rrf
MARIE WILSION = :._...

ENDING TODAY
An unusual motion. pic-
ture as excitingly differ-
ent as its title.

7

med a three-run
eighth.

homer in the

, * *

NATIONAL
W
Philadelphia 36
St. Louis 37
Brooklyn 35
Boston 35
Chicago 31
New York 31
Cincinnati 21
Pittsburgh 23

LEAGUE
L Pet.
26 .581
27 .578
26 .574
28 .556
30 .508
31 .500
41 .339
40 .365

GB
1 1/
1/2
4%
5
15
131/

I

AB
Robinson, Dodger 233
Kell, Tigers 257
Doby, Indians 202
Musial, Cardinals 222
Evers, Tigers 222
Slaughter, Cards 247

R
52
56
45
45
43
44

H:
88
96
75
78
78
83

Pct.
.378
.374
.371
.351
.351
.336

1 I , m li

-- . c

005
/ J

i

SINGLES ON SALE TODAY
The Department of Speech
presents

r

I

7 OUTSTANDING PLAYS
THE CORN IS GREEN... ................... July 5-8
ANTIGONE AND THE TYRANT..........July 12-15
THE TIME OF YOUR LIFE ..............July 19-22
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
THE ALCHEMIST.............. July 27
KINGLEAR ....................July 28
(Not included in Season Tickets)
HANSEL' AND GRETE'............. August 2-5
In conjunction with the School of Music

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Av.
W. P. Lemon and W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Harper Maybee, Director of Music
Mary Lown, Organist
10:30 A.M.: Church School Summer Session,
Classes through Sixth Grade.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Dr. Lemon's ser-
mon topic-"The Beyond That is Within."
5:30 P.M.: Summer School Vespers in the Social
Hall with Professor Harley Bartlett speaking
on "Facing the Issue of the Atomic Age." A
cost luncheon follows at 6:30 P.M.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Student Directors-H. L. Pickerill; Jean Garee
Music-Wayne Dunlap; J. Bertram Strickland
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Dr. Parr will preach
on the subject, "All the Eggs in One Basket."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild supper. Speaker: Dr.
McKeachie on "The Psychology of Religion.'%
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Subject-God.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Services.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
.This room is open daily, except Sundays and
holidays, from 11:30 A.M. to 5 P.M.

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
National Lutheran Council
1304 Hill Street
Henry 0. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Services in Zion and Trin-
ity Churches.
5:30 P.M.: Lutheran Student Association Meet-
ing in Zion Parish Hall-Prof. Isaac Alex-
ander of Andra Christian College in India
will speak on "The Church in India."
Wednesday -
4:00 P.M.: Tea and Coffee Hour at the Center.
7:30 P.M.: The Tuesday Discussion Hour will

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL

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