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August 09, 1950 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-08-09

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E
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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIMEE

..,

PAGE THREE

F1 o
~For

Wa o o g Tigers Flub, 9-6

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The Last Time

And Only a Buck

Robinson Donates Purse
In Final welter Defense

JERSEY CITY-(/P)-Ray Rob-
t 1naon risks his welterweight title
for the last time tonight (9 p.m.
EST) in Roosevelt stadium against
Charlie Fusari in a Damon Run-
yon Canfer Fund show.
I "Win, lose or draw, this is
my last welterweight defense,"
said Sugar Ray at his Pomp-
tA Lakes, N. J., camp yester-
day.
But Robinson didn't say "po-
sitively." Later he added that he
wants to be sure of a title bout
wits middleweight champion Jake
LaMotta before he gives up the
welter title.
! was obvious that the struggle
to make the 147-pound limit is
? taing too much out of him.
No longer a natural welter, Rob-
Limited TV
For Big Ten
grid Tilts Set
CHICAGO -(P)-The Western
Conference approved yesterday an
experimental program to televise
some Big Ten football games in
2 1950.,
Kenneth L. Wilson, commission-
er of athletics for the Conference,
announced some games will be
available to simultaneous large
screen theater-television. Post-
game films of games will be shown
by regular television broadcast.
This combination program
will be conducted on' a one-
year basis.
Wilson said the new plan is
aimed at controlling the size of
; the, audience and the selection of
the location for showing. The-
aters can be chosen so as not to
endanger attendance at the game
itself, or that of a ~neighboring
institution's game.
'T'he program is experimental,
and, as a result, its scope will be
very limited for the coming sea-
son, Wilson said.
Tests are planned for Chicago
and Detroit. In Chicag games at
Illinois and Northwestern will be
theater-televised in three theat-
ers.
" lIn Detroit, Michigan games
il be shown in one, theater.
he four theaters average slight-
ly less than 4,000 seats1each.
It is planned to carry games
each Saturday through the 1950
season.
Wilson said attempts are being
made to bring Minnesota and Ohio
Stae into the program.
"Indicative of the experiment-
fI aspects of this program is the
fat that we have not yet drawn
any financial agreement," Wil-
son said.
"The athletic directors of the
Big Ten have readily confessed
theV do not know the answers to
- many complex problems posed by
'hiye' television," Wilson said.
t~ o<o;;oo-c j
FRATERNITY 6
o JEWELRY_
SOUVENIRS - GIFTS~
TRADITIONAL MUGS p
DIAMONDS - WATCHES
CUPS - TROPHIES
o L. G. BALFOUR CO*c
1319 S. University
f"Home of the-
"Official Michigan Ring" c
)Summer Hours, tenRtill five;
closed Saturdays. ;

inson weighed 155 pounds for the
Robert Villemain fight July 12 at
Philadelphia.
What Sugar Ray has in mind
is a shot at Jake LaMotta's
middle weight crown. But that
,may be a distant proposition.
No promoter has been able to
get the two to agree on terms
and the International Boxing
Club has Jake under exclusive
contract.
In the meantime, Robinson
fights a doubleheader t o d a y
against (1) the scales and (2) Fu-
sari, a blond 25-year-old puncher
from Irvington, N. J., and he's
doing it for less than taxi fare.
The lean Harlem slasher will
fight for the sum of one dol-
lar. Ray donates his 30 per cent
purse to the fund which may
realize about $50,000 if 30,000
fans pay $150,000 as expected.
The battle of the scales, sche-
duled for 10 a.m. at Roosevelt Sta-
dium promises to be tougher than
the 15-rounder with Fusari. How-
ever Ray will make the weight
with a little to spare. It remains
to see how much it has sapped
his strength.
Supporter of Fusari, a 5 to 1
underdog, count on a sub-par
Robinson to tire against an in-
spired challenger.
There will be no television of
the battle, firt major New Jersey
bout since the late Marcel Cerdan
knocked out Tony Zale for the
middleweight championship.
A FLOP?
Shirley May
Sobs, Other
Lass Swims
DOVER, Eng. -(P)- Pretty
Florence Chadwick, a "desert
mermaid" from San Diego, Calif.,
swam the English Channel today
an hour faster than any other
woman in history.
Shirley May France, a more
publicized entry from Somerset,
Mass., failed for the second time
in two years to complete the pun-
ishing grind - 19 miles as the
crow flies; 22 or more as the
swimmer breasts the tide.
Florence splashed through the
seaweed under Dover's chalk
cliffs just 13 hours and 20 mn-
-,tes after plunging into the
water at Cap Gris Nez, France.
A trim, lithe professional swim-
mer who decided to try the chan-
nel while working as a typist for
the Arabian-American Oil Com-
pany in hot, sandy Saudi Arabia,
she erased the women's record of
14 hours and 34 minutes set by
Gertrude Ederly of New York Aug.
6, 1926. She is 31.
Shirley May, a 17-year-old high
school girl, was pulled hysterical1
and weeping into her pilot boat,
still eight and a half miles from
her goal, almost at the moment
Florencerstepped ashore.
"Everyone's going to think
I'm a flop," Shirley May sobbed.
They started from the French
coast only 19 minutes apart. Flor-
ence plunged in at 2:37 a.m. (2:37
p.m. EST Monday) and Shirley
May at 2:56 a.m.f
It never developed into a race.t
Swimming like a machine, for
a while at the fantastic rate of 60
strokes a minute, Florence soon
left Shirley May far behind.

Locke Goes
After $2,500
vs. Mangrum
Tam Title at Stake
In 18-HolePlayoffs
CHICAGO-(P)-Exiled f r o m
American fairways for more than
a year under a PGA ban Bobby
Locke returned with a vengeance
yesterday to sweep into a 72-hole
tie with Lloyd Mangrum for the
Tam O'Shanter All-American golf
title.
They both closed their fourth
round with 67's for a six-under-
par tally of 282, forcing them into
an 18 hole playoff beginning at
2 p.m. (EST) today. A first prize
of $2,500 is at stake.
It was Locke's rusty blade
putter, which loooks like a
throwback from the caveman
days, which once again proved
the fatal weapon. The South
African, fresh from winning
the British Open and a batch
of other British events, birdied
four of the last five with putts
of 32, 12, 30, and 22 feet.
This closing drive, one of the
greatest in the 10 year history of
the colorful Tam O'Shanter gold
rush, gave him a five-under 31
on the back nine to couple with
his standard front side of 36.
Locke was banned by the PGA
last June when he failed to ful-
fill a contract to appear at the
Toledo Inverness Invitational. He
previously had shunned several
exhibition dates.
The boom was lifted on him
this April by the PGA and "old
Muffin Face" - now sporting
a cookie duster under his nose
- made the Tam meet his first
on his return to the U. S.
The heavy jowled pro from Jo-
hannesburg and his trusty putter
carved out many an American
dollar on the tourney circuit be-
ginning in 1947 after he had
trounced Sam Snead in African
exhibitions.
Mangrum was an early start-
er today and blazed in with a
31 - with birdie putts from 9
to 15 feet - and 36 for his 67.
Then, as rain threatened, but
eventually held off, lean Lloyd
sat back with his 282 tally and
watched the boys try to beat it.
* * *
Wehrle Pro?
No Differ'ence,
StranahianiIn
CHICAGO -()-- Defending
champion Frank Stranahan, al-
ready ahead by five strokes, won
by technical disqualification yes-
terday over troubled Wilford Weh-
rle on the 18th green of their
playoff for the All-American Am-
ateur Golf Title.
No card was turned in for
Wehrle, who picked up on the
last green when Stranahan sank
a 15-footer. Arch Matson, tour-
ney rules chairman, said the
pick-up automatically disquali-
fied Wehrle.
Wehrle had started the playoff
after a charge today by the U.S.-
G.A. in New York that he has lack-
ed amateur status for the past
two years.
Stranahan, much-traveled si-
mon-pure from Toledo, Ohio, un-
reeled a four-underpar, 68, com-
pared with a theoretical 73 for

Wehrle. The two had tied in- the
regulation 72-hole distance over
Tam O'Shanter's par 36-36-72
course at 291 strokes Monday.
The U.S.G.A. statement today
told Tam Promoter George S. May
that Wehrle is not an amateur.
But Wehrle teed off in the play-
off with the comment that he in-
tends soon to apply for reinstate-
ment as an amateur.
Star's Pride
2-1 Favorite
In NYClassic
GOSHEN, N.Y. -P)- Thirteen
smart stepping trotters, cream of

PHILS MOVING AWAY:

Roberts Takes 15th;
Giants Extend Streak

By The Associated Press
BROOKLYN - Robin Roberts
gained his 15th triumph last night
as he pitched the Philadelphia
Phils to a 6-5 victory over the
Brooklyn Dodgers.
The win increased the Phils'
first place lead to five games over
the Boston Braves who were beat-
en by the New York Giants, 2-1.
Roberts needed help in the ninth
from Jim Konstanty.
The Brooks almost pulled the
game out of the fire in the ninth,
but Konstanty retired two pinch
hitters on groundouts with the
tying run in scoring position.
Philadelphia 010 010 220-6 12 0
Brooklyn .. 000 111 011-5 13 2
Roberts, Konstanty (9) and
Seminick; Newcombe, Erskine
(8) and Campanella.
BOSTON-Wes Westrum's one-
on homer extended the New York
Giants' winning streak to eight
straight and 17 victories in the
last 18 last night when his forces
topped the Boston Braves, 2-1, at
the expense of Lefty Warren
Spahn.
Sheldon Jones turned back the
Tribesmen with four hits, includ-
ing Bob Elliott's 18th homer of
the season.
Westrum decided the brilliant
Jones-Spahn mound duel by clear-
ing the center field fence with
Monte Irvin aboard in the sixth
inning.
Spahn struck out eight and gave
up four bases on balls as Jones
fanned four and walked two.
New York .. 000 002 000-2 5 0
Boston...... 000 100' 000-1 4 2
Jones and Westrum; Spahn
and Cooper.
* * *
PITTSBURGH-Despite Ralph
Kiner's 30th home run of the year
and another by Clyde McCullough,
the Pittsburgh Pirates lost their
10th game in a row last night to
the St. Louis Cardinals, 6-4.
The loss set a losing streak re-
cord for the league this season.
McCullough's homer gave the
Bucs their first score in 33 inn-
ings.
A crowd of 18,243 saw Stan Mu-
sial win the game in the second
inning with a circuit clout that
sent Red Schoendienst across home
plate ahead of him. It was Musi-
al's 16th of the season.
Kiner's No. 30 sock put him five
days and six games ahead of his
1949 pace, when he ended the
season with 54 home runs to his
credit.
St. Louis .. 140 000 010-6 11 0
Pittsburgh .. 001 300 000-4 13 3
Pollet, Martin (4) and D.
Rice; Chambers, Pierro (3),
Lombardi (5), MacDonald (6)
and McCullough.
CINCINNATI-The Reds moved
within a half-game of the sixth
place Chicago Cubs here yesterday
by defeating the Bruins in both
games of a twilight-night double-
header.
Ken Raffensberger coasted in
Stars Elect Two
DELAFIELD, Wis. --m)- Doak
Walker, Southern Methodist half-
back, and Clayton Tonnemaker,
Minnesota center, were elected co-
captains of the College All-Star
football team yesterday.
The All-Stars will play the Phil-
atdelphia Eagles, champions of the
National Football League, in the
17th annual game in Soldier Field
Friday night. An estimated 80,000
are expected to see the game.
1, _.

the first game, 10 to 1, giving up
10 hits, and Willard Ramsdell shut
out the Cubs on five hits in the
last game to win 9 to 0.
Chicago .. 001 000 000-1 10 2
Cincinnati 400 303 00x--10 11 2
Rush, Leonard (4)andOwen;
Raffensberger and Landrith.

Chicago .... 000 000 000-0 51
Cincinnati .. 051 002 Olx-9 14 0
Klippstein, Lade (2), Vander
Meer (8) and Sawatski; Rams-
dell and Howell.

I
0

MAJOR LEAGUE
STANDINGS

Yanks Lose
To Red Sox
Indians Idle
By The Associated Press
CHICAGO-The Chicago White
Sox bounced back from a 5-0 defi-
cit to defeat Detoit's first place
Tigers, 9-6, befre 21,065 persons
last night.
After Chicago pulled a 6-6 tie,
Eddie Robinson's No. 12 homer
opened a three-run eighth inning
rally to giverthe White Sox the
series opener.
Detroit .... 401 000 100-6 8-3
Chicago .... 000 004 23x-9 12 2
White, Borowy (6), Calvert
(7), Stuart (8) and Swift;
Wight, Judson (7), Gumpert
(7), Aloma (8) and Masi.
NEW YORK-(AP)-A1 Zarilla
batted intwo runs with a home
run and two singles to lead the
Boston Red Sox to a 7-4 triumph
over the New York Yankees last
night.
Mel Parnell went all the way
for his ninth victory before a turn-
out of 58,771 fans. The loss drop-
ped the Yankees into a second
place tie with the idle Cleveland
Indians.
Parnell held the Yanks to eight
hits, one of them a homer by Yogi
Berra.
Boston 200 030 020-7 13 1
New York 011 001 010-4 8 2
Parnell and Tebbetts; Rey-
nolds, Sanford (2), Ford (6),
Page (8) and Berra
PHILADELPHIA - Lefty Lou
Brissie pitched a two hit shut-
out last night as the Philadelphia
Athletics won 5 to 0 over Washing-
ton before the smallest major lea-
gue crowd of the year in Phila-
delphia, only 1,102.
It was Brissie's sixth victory
against 13 defeats, and the sec-
ond shutout victory of his base-
ball career. Washington also was
the victim, 6 to 0, on July 8.
Washington 000 000 000-0 2 0
Philadalphia 000 001 04x-5 8 0
Hudson and Evans; Brissie
and Astreth.
YOUR SUMMER HAIRCUT
is styled for comfort and
coolness-plenty of barbers.
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

FINAL CLEARANCE
All Wool
SPORT COATS
Tweed, Herringbones,Diagonals
MEN'S TOGGERY
607 EAST LIBERTY-Next to Michigan Theatre
Beat Rising Costs!

NATIONAL
W
Philadelphia 64
Boston 57
Brooklyn 54
St. Louis 57
New York 53
Chicago 43
Cincinnati 43
Pittsburgh 34
* *

LEAGUE
L Pct.
42 .604
45 .559
43 .557
46 .553
47 .530
57 .430
58 .426
67 .337
*

GB
5
5 '
5%
8
18
18 l2
27%

I ~jitllI4t
[i

Navy
'T' SHIRTS
45c
Combed white cotton, crew
neck. Sizes 32-44. Perfect
quality.
White Navy
SHORTS
49c
Sanf. shrunk cotton.
Sizes 28 to 42.
Broadcloth
SHORTS
59c
Sanf. shrunk stripes. Choice
of boxer or regular style.
Sizes 28 to 42.
MEN'S BRIEFS
39c
Combed cotton, elasticized
waist. Sized small, med.,
large.

TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Brooklyn
New York at Boston
St. Louis at Pittsburgh
Chicago at Cincinnati
* * *
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Detroit
New York
Cleveland
Boston
Washington
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia

W
64
62
62
60
45

L
36
40
40
44
54

Pct.
.640
.608
.608
.577
.455

GB
3
3
6
181)

42 64 .396 25
36 64 .360 28
37 66 .359 28%
* * -

TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Chicago
Boston at New York
Cleveland at St. Lohis
Washington at Philadelphia

OPEN 'TIL 6 P.M.
SAWES STOIE
122 East Washington

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B

He're's Your Chance to Read It for Yourself!.
, 1
These are some of the people I
who have signed thus far: WORLD PEACE APPEAL
I I
Frank Lloyd Wright I I
Architect I I
rev. J. Burt Boumann 1 I
Secy. Mich. Council of Churches 1 Y E DEMAND the unconditional prohibition of
George Bernard Shaw j the atomic weapon as an instrument of aggression and I
I I
Crockett Johnson mass extermination of human beings.I
Creator of "Barnaby"bens
I I
-ormer Premier Edward Herriot WE call for the institution of strict international con-
Thomas Mann I trol to enforce this.
Author I I
:red Stover C WE will regard as guilty of war crimes against hu-
Pres. Iowa Farmers' Union-
Prinanity that government which first uses the atomic I
Dr. Harry F. Ward I I
Prof. Em. Christian Ethics weapon against any country.
Union Theological Seminary
Dr. W. E. B. DuBois I WE call upon all people of good will all over the I
Sen. Glen H. IT world to sign this Appeal.
Tn.aylor
Madame Sun-Yat-Sen 1
I I
grime Minister Kekkonen of Finland Name City
-enri Matisse I__
Pablo PicassoI-
Maurice ChevalierI1
:atholic Bishops of Trieste,
Crvosseto, Pescia, Acyui
)r. Anton J. Carlson
Head of Physics Dept. It can serve only the cause of Humanity
University of Chicago
ustice James Wolfe It can serve only the ideology of Humanitarianism
of Utah Supr. Ct.
oy Scouts of France Sign this and get your friends to sign.
rench Federation of Girl Scouts Clip out and mail to -

I

I..

.,

1

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

I

(continued from Page 4)
Coming Events
Deutsches Haus, 1101 Church
Street, will hold its last "Open
House" of the summer Thursday,
August 10, from 7:30 to 10 p.m.
At 8:00 Prof. Henry W. Nordmey-
er, professor of German and chair-
man of the German Department,
will be the speaker. All German-

4

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