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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 09, 1950 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-08-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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RadioGroup
T5oPresent
Day On Air
The regular routine of a radio
station will be open to the public
view tomorrow in the Angell Hall
studios of the radio-speech de-
partment.
"Operation 4006," will encom-
pass a full day's radio programs
in four and a half hours of steady
broadcasting. The simulated clos-
ed-circuit broadcasting will be
held from 3 to 5:30 p.m. and from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. and will be open
to the public.
THE "OPERATION" is designed
to acquaint students with what a
regular broadcasting day is like
on a commercial radio station, and
the shows to be used are pro-
grams which are heard over com-
mercial stations. Such daytime
shows as "Portia Faces Life," and
children's delights like the "Lone
Ranger" will be featured.
The actual program 'time will
be cut drastically in order to
allow all the programs to be
aired. The "Lone Ranger," nor-
rnally a half-hour show will be
condensed to seven and a half
minutes - just about enough
time for a few good "Hi-yos."
Station breaks and advertise-
ments have all been written by
students, and the commercials
promise to be different. They will
be on regular products which do
advertise over the air, but the
students promise a few new twists.
A LISTENING room will be set
up for visitors, and the staff em-
phasized that all were welcome to
attend either session.
Broadcasting will be done in
the two Angell Hall studios, one
of which, numbered 4006, do-
nated its name to the project.
This is the second of the radio-
speech continuity broadcasts, and
plans are already being laid for
a third next Fall when WMDS
(Michigan Department pf Speech)
will broadcast commercially for
WHRV.
"There will probably be mis-
takes made, but that does not mat-
ter a great deal," according to
Prof. Garnet R. Garrison who is
in charge of the affair. It is the
educational value and experience
the students will get from this
experiment that is important.

Sabbatical Sail

1 aily-New Orieans Photo news
PROF. BROWN TOURS-Prof. Everett S. Brown of the politicial science department, and his wife
fit in their luxury-liner cabin preparatory to a 47-day South A rnerican cruise. They will visit Mon-
tevideo, Uruguay; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Santos, San Paulo ani d Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The former
head of the political science department spent several days touring New Orleans before boarding the
vessel. He is on sabbatical leave.

Grad Helping In
Atlantic Pact Move
John F. Schmidt, a University
graduate, is one of three men who
have just collaborated to produce
a new set of "Federalist Papers,"
which are designed to spearhead
the movement for a federation of
Atlantic Pact nations.
Patterned after the original
"Federalist Papers," the new ones
were also authoried by Owen J.
Roberts, former associate justice
of the U. S. Supreme Court and
Clarence K. Streit, a former New
York Times correspondent.
All are members of the Atlantic
Union Committee, a political ac-
tion group.
The AUC's resolution asking a
constitutional convention of At-
lahtic Pact nations, in order to
discuss federation, was passed by
the Canadian Senate June 29, and
hearings have been held in the
U. S. Senate.

IC Sponsors New Broadcast
Entitled 'Radio Round Table'

Foreign students may air their
views every Monday this summer
and all next year on a new 15-
minute radio program entitled,
"The Radio Round Table," beard
over WUOM at 2:15 p.m., sponsor-
ed by the International Center.
* *
"THE VOICE of America" pro-
gram, by the State Department,
transcribes and sends discussions
of the Round Table to overseas na-
tions, aiming especially at those
behind the Iron Curtain.
In the panel's latest discussion,
''My Impressions of America," Ger-
hard Zarn of Germany expected to
be able to see democracy at work.
"Instead, I find the American
democratic way of life much

more subtle than I thought," he
declared.
The individualism of the Ameri-
can way of life surprised Andrzej
Romer of Poland.
THAT EVERY respected Ameri-
can is expected to wear a hat and
white shirt doesn't necessarily
mean that such standardization
leaves Americans with less indi-
viduality and personality. There is
a broader ring of social life-around
them and they have to standardize
something," Romer commented.
Mrs. Prakash Singh of India
feels that solving the problems of
equality, freedom, and economic
independence of women has put
them on the same footing as
men.

Relics From
Michigan's
Past Showi
By NANCY BYLAN
Ann Arbor might never have
been in Michigan if Thomas Jef-
ferson's plan for dividing up the
Northwest Territory had gone
through.
A sketch of what Jefferson had
in mind can be seen in the Cle-
ments Library's current exhibit
on Michigan Rarities.
* * *
THE MAP shows modern Mich-
igan roughly divided into three
different areas. The upper penin-
sula is part of a long rectangular
state called "one." It includes part
of Wisconsin and Minnesota.
The southern part of the low-
er peninsula is joined to frag-
ments of present day Indiana
and Ohio to form state "five"
while the rest of the state is
labeled "three."
The exhibit, which will run un-
til the end of September, traces
the chronological history of Mich-
igan from a record of the first
white men to visit the territory
in 1622 to the final withdrawal
of the British from Detroit in
1794.
INCLUDED IN the exhibit are
yellowed narratives of 17th century
voyages up the Great Lakes and
cartographic masterpieces of the
area between ' these lakes, with
noticeably distorted "thumbs."
Treaties and letters and official
papers can also be found in the
display.
Census takers as well as voy-
agers, explorers and military
men played a part in the early
history of Michigan. One of the
features of the exhibit is an
early census of the inhabitants
of the country near Detroit,
made in French for the British
authorities.
Among the names listed are
many still prominentsin Detroit-
Rivard, Tremble, Campau, Beau-
bien and Livernois.
* * *
ANOTHER ITEM in the ex-
hibit is a book citing an anecdotal
account of an early passage
through the Straits of Mackniac
by an explorer who thought, upon
landing, that he had found China.
Many of the letters in the ex-
hibit concern the activities of
the Indian chief Pontiac and
his seige of Detroit. The In-
dians are described as "merci-
less villains" in a letter from
the commander-in-chief of the
British forces in America.
Program On
Near East Set
The Near Eastern Institute, the
International Center and the Arab
Club will present a movie and dis-
cussion program on the economic,
sociological and political implica-
tions of the Near East in world af-
fairs at 8 p.m. tonight in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
Prof. George Cameron of the
Near Eastern Institute will give a
few introductory remarks. Prof.
Brymer Williams of the chemical
and metallurgical engineering de-
partment.,wil speak on the tech-
,f.al'dvanlee f the Near East.

DR. IALIN DOSS, of the Egyp-
tian' Consul's offite in San Fran-
cisco, will speak on the cultural
aspect. Colored films from the
Egyptian Consul's office and an
Arabian oil company will illustrate
his lecture. Kamal Shair, presi-
dent of the Arab Club, will speak
on the sociological aspect of the
Near East.
After each lecture, a question
and answer period will be held
with the exchanging of opinions
encouraged.
Refreshments will be served in
the Western Conference Room fol-
lowing the discussion. The pro-
gram is open to the public.

The Law School will publish its
first newspaper this fall, accord-
ing to Chet Byrns, '51, chairman
of the executive council of the
Law Student Association.
Law students are already work-
ing on the copy for the first edi-
tion of the monthly publication
which will hit the stands Sept.
25, bearing the name "Res Gestae.
* * *
JAMES L. ROGERS, '51L, has
been appointed managing editor
by the executive council for the
L.S.A.; Prof. Allan F. Smith of
the Law School is the temporary
faculty adviser; Byrns is the stu-
dent adviser and Stanley Silver-
man '51L is business manager for
the new publication.
"Res Gestae" is sponsored and
financed by the L.S.A., the or-
ganization of all law students.
It will be distributed to all mem-
bers who have paid their an-
nual dues and to alumni who
subscribe to the publication.
The subscription rate has not
yet been determined, but the
first edition will be financed by
a special gift from the law
school faculty.
Devoting itself to the report-
ing of news of the law school, the
paper will report the news from
other law schools and from the
legal profession all over the coun-
try as well. The paper will keep
students informed of the plans
and actions of both the law school
administration and the executive
council of the LSA.
"Res Gestae" will avoid any po-
litical discussions or crusades, ac-
cording to the executive council,
Make Phoenix
Study Grants
Research grants totaling $19,-
200 have been made by the Pre-
liminary Planning Committee of
the Michigan-Memorial Phoenix
Project, according to Dean Ralph
A. Sawyer, chairman of the com-
mittee.
Dr. Fred J. Hodges, of the medi-
cal school received a $7,500 award
to support an isotope laboratory
for handling radioactive material.
* * *
PROF. H. R. CRANE of the phy-
sics department will be given $4,-
700 to continue construction and
operation of a highly specialized
Geiger counter to date relics over
5,000 years old.
A $2,600 award went to Prof.
H. H. Bartlett of the botany de-
partment for research on the
direction of human migration
through the Aleution Islands.
Prof. John W. Lederle of the
political science department will
study the activities of Congress in
maintaining legislative direction
and control over the development
of the nation's atomic energy pro-
gram with a $1,800 grant.
Donald A. Glaser of the physics
department received $750 to study
high-energy cosmic rays, and Prof.
Robert W. Parry of the chemistry
department will study ion ex-
change resins on a $650 grant.
Cosng for Sumvner
FINE ORIENTAL
RUGS

35% to 45% disc.-
on all choice pieces
N. L. MANGOUNI
334 So. 4th. Ph.6878
. , l'-.

and its primary purpose will be to
promote the professional interests
of the law student body and to
record their activities.
By publishing its own newspa-
per, Michigan is joining the ranks
of many other law schools who

1204 South University
serving
BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS and DINNERS
SANDWICHES and SALADS
from_________
7:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. and 5:00 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Closed Sundays
For a few cents and a very few minutes
START THE WEEKEND WITH A
WARDROBE OF CLEAN CLOTHES
THE LAUNDROMAT IS COMPLETELY
EQUIPPED TO HANDLE YOUR WASH DAY
PROBLEMS-
to' 25e per washer load
i.'Attendants always ready td aid you.
HOURS-8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
HALF-HOUR LAUNDRY

'RES GESTAE' TO BE NAME:

i

I I

Law School To Have Student Paper

y

are publishing weekly and monthly
papers. "Res Gestae" will have an
active exchange department tp
trade news and ideas with these
other law schools, most of whom
already send copies of their pub-
licAtions to Ann Arbor.

510 E. Williams

Phone 5540

"wr r

University of Michigan Oratorical Association
19110-51 LECTURE COURSE

COOL!

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

CLA*NEISS1 .

Hill Auditorium

Evenings at 8:30

Last -Times Today
r
JOH DEREK- DIANA LYN
Starts Thursday

I1

JACKIE
ROBINSON
"The Pride of Broollyn"
as HIMSELF
::. in

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
o BUSINESS
SERVICES
Bargain Week Bargain Week Bargain
78 weeks of Life-$7.80
78 weeks of Time-$6.87.
To new subscribers only. Good for
graduation gifts, Birthdays. Student
Periodical Agency, 2-8242.)
BABY PARAKEETS and Canaries. New
and used bird cages. Reasonable
prices. 562 S. Seventh, Ph. 5330. )2B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPE-109E. Wash-,
ington. Custom Clothes and Altera-
tions. )3B
WASHING-Finish work and ironing
also. Rough dry and wet washing.
Free pick up and delivery. Ph. 2-900.
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist, at
308 S. State. Legal, Masters, Doctors
dissertations, etc. Call 2-2615 or
2-9848. )13
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company,
215 E. Liberty. )
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales & Service
MORRILLS-314 S. State St. )4B
FOR RENT
SUBLET for Fall term only-4 room
furnished apatrment, $80 mo. Con-
venient location. Call evenings 3-4402.
)8R

PERSONAL

I

FORTUNE is not a Fortune at Student
PeriodicalAgency, 2-8242.)2
KIDDIE KARE-Reliable baby sitters.
Ph. 3-1121.

I.

LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161 )1P
TRANSPORTATION

BEAT THE RISING COSTS! Navy "T"
shirts-45c; white Navy Broadcloth
Shirts-49c; Briefs-39c; Undershirts
-39c; All Wool AthleticHose-49c.
Open 'til 6 P.M. Sam's Store, 122 E.
_Washington St. )
ROYAL PORTABLE-Recently overhaul-
ed, excellent condition. $40. Call
7009. )41
1949 CUSHMAN Motor Scooter. Call
3-4986, leave name, ph. number. )42
2-WHEEL TRAILERS-Will BUY or sgll.
Antique chest. Twin-beds and chests.
716 S. Forest. Ph. 2-2800. )40
ANTIQUE CHERRY CHEST - Walnut
and maple single or bunk bed, match-
ing chest, mirrors, chairs, pillows,
pads._716 S. Forest after 4 p.m. )40
1930 CHEVROLET COUPE-Good condi-
tion, radio and heater. Call Don Edge
_9400 after 5. )39

FOR SALE

1 .. -,

WANTED-Ride to Grand Rapids on
Friday. Call 8301 and ask for Eloise.
)9T
DOCTOR DRIVING TO CALIF-Leave
Aug. 18 or 19. Want riders. Share costs
and driving. Ph. 3-8214 after 6 p.m.
8T
WANTED TO RENT
GRADS-WANT TRIPLE SUITE with pri
vate bath for fall. Near campus. Call
.2-1465 after 7. )3N
STUDENT-Experienced house painter.
Wants room and work near campus.
Bob Shore, 2-0113. ) 4N
WANTED TO BUY
WIRE RECORDER-Ph. 8426, leave mes-
sage. )4W
HOUSE FOR MEDICAL FRATERNITY-
Full year occupancy. Preferably near
Hospital. Call Dr. Jacobson 2-9460. )1lN
LOST & FOUND
LOST-Black zipper notebook, name F.
Faulkner on cover. Phone University
_extension 2588. Reward. ___)21 L
LOST-Mon. 7 Aug. K&E slide rule, be-
tween Arb entrance on Geddes & E.
Eng. Finder please call W. Conrad,
2-6674. )22L

aukTOIN

HELP
WANTED

MINOR
WATSON
as"Banchickey'
RICHARD LANE . RUBY DEE
AN EAGLE-LON RELEASE

MAN WANTED-Full: >r ptt . Car
necessary. No canvassing. Arrange
own hours for good, assurred income.
Call 3-1168 evenings. )6H
YOUNG MEN-20-30 yrs., < wishing to
improve their spare time at good pay,
learning heating business. Excellent
preparation for meeting people and
gaining experience. Here is an oppor-
tunity to make money while waiting
for fall termto begin or a permanent
connection if you so desire. Apply in
person. Holland Furnace Co., 311 S.
Ashley. )5H
Buy and Sell Through
Daily Classifieds

Charles Langhton Nov. I
SCHEDULE OF ATTRACTIONS
Oct. 18 DAVID E. LILIENTHAL
"Atomic Energy for Peace"
Nov. 1 CHARLES LAUGHTON
"An Evening With Charles Laughton"
Nov. 7 LOWELL THOMAS, JR.
"Out of This World; A Journey to Lhasa"
Color Motion Pictures-

Nov. 29

WILLIAM LAURENCE

"The Truth About the Hydrogen Bomb"
Jan.16 BENNETT CERF
"Changing Styles in American Humor"
Mar. 7 JOHN MASON BROWN
"Seeing More Things"
Mar.15 JULIEN BRYAN
"England in a Changing World"
Color Motion Pictures
Season Ticket Prices (7 Lectures)

11

N"'W"MM -M'l AW .0 -ml I

11

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