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August 06, 1950 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1950-08-06

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StNV AY, AUGUST .S61950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREt

Phils Beat Cards, 2-1; Increase NL Lead to

4 Game

5

- ,

Formal Battle for Lions'
Berths Starts This W eek

* * * *
Major League Standings

* * *
AMERICAN LEAGUE

e

* * *
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Keiser, Douglas Share
Early Lead in Tam Golf

11

/_.

YPSILANTI-('P)-The coming
week is shakedown week in the
Detroit Lions pro football camp
with Bo McMillin opening up his
"full scrimmage" schedule.
During the past six days, the
Lions' chief has confined his twice-.
daily practices chiefly to condi-
tioning and the stress of funda-
mentals. Only one scrimmage was
held, and that on a brief look-see
basis for the coaches.
* * *
BUT THE BARS will be let
down when some 50 players open
battle for the 32 team places. A
single practice today will be de-
voted chiefly to scrimmage.
From now until the opening
game Sept. 17, McMillian plans
to carry a squad of some 40
players. The Lions face a rugged
six-game exhibition schedule
starting Aug. 15 and Bo doesn't
want to penalize his team by
overwork.
"We can well afford to carry a
reasonably large squad for our
exhibition schedule,"McMillin said.
"What's more, the longer we hold
our boys theb etter chance they'll
have to prove their value."
RIGHT NOW, a nifty battle
looms for then end positions. On
deck from last year's squad are
only three veterans, one of whom
played both end and tackle.
Co-Capt. John Greene, the
Lions' greatest all-time pass re-
ceiver, is starting his seventh
season. Although an offensive
fixture, Greene might see work
at defense this fall.
Dick Rifenburg, former Michigan
All-American, has impressed his
coaches in catching passes. How-
ever, the former Saginaw prep
star is taking a bit longer to round
into shpae due to his absence
from football last fall because of
a knee injury.

THE GREAT experiment in the
Lions' camp involves the shift of
veteran halfback Cloyce Box to an
offensive end position. Box is a
six-foot, four inch 220-pounder
whose speed and ability to catch
'passes prompted McMillin into the
change.
Jim Cain, obtained from the
Cardinals, and Bill O'Connor,
purchased from Cleveland, both
are defensive specialists.
Then, there's giant Leon Hart,
everybody's All-America last fall
from Notre Dame. Hart is with
the Chicago All-Stars and is not
due to join the Lions until Aug.
12.
* * *
MEANWHILE, the Detroit Foot-
ball Company was completing
plans for a "Meet the Lions" ban-
quet Aug. 14 in Detroit's Hotel
Statler.
Former players will be special
guests as will all present Lions
in training here at Michigan
State Normal College.
Speakers will include E a r 1
(Dutch) Clark, who led Detroit
to its only league title in 1935, Ed-
win J. Anderson, the club presi-
dent; Baseball Commissioner A.
B. Chandler, who is a friend of Mc-
Millin, and ABC Sports Director
Harry Wismer.
Engineer Wins IM
Badminton Crown
Kuldip Singh Maini, civil en-
gineering senior from Punjab, In-
dia, won the summer intramural
badminton championship yester-
day.
Maini defeated Rudolii A. Breed,
from Toledo, 0., in the final play-
offs out of an original field of 20.
entries.

Detroit
Cleveland
New York
Boston
Washington
Chicago
Philadelphia
St. Louis

W
63
62
61
57
45
41
36
34

L
35
39
39
44
52
62
64
64

Pct.
.643
.614
.610
.564
.464
.398
.360
.347

GB
2 %
3
7%/
17
24
28
29

Philadelphia
Boston
Brooklyn
St. Louis
New York
Chicago
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh

w
62
56
54
54
49
42
40
34

L
40
42
41
45
47
54
58
64

Pct.
.608
.571
.568
.545
.510
.438
.408
.347

GB
4
41.,
6%
10
17-
20
26

* * *
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Cleveland - Byrne
(11-6) vs. Lemon (17-4).
Washington at Detroit - Bear-
den (1-3) vs. Trout (7-2).
Philadelphia at St. Louis -
Shantz (6-10) vs. Garver (8-10).
Boston at Chicago - (2) Kiner
(10-11) and Dobson (11-8) vs.
Pierce (8-10) and Judson (2-1).

TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Philadelphia - (2)
- Lanier (9-4) and Boyer (4-2)
vs. Miller (10-2) and Church (5-
1).
Pittsburgh at New York - (2)
-- Werle (6-8) and Dickson (5-
12) vs. Jansen (12-7) and Maglie
(8-3).
Chicago at Boston - (2) -
Schmitz (9-9) and Hiller (5-2) vs.
Sain (15-7) and Antonelli (1-1).
Cincinnati at Brooklyn - Black-
well (10-11) vs. Branca (5-5).

GIL HODGES
. . . two-run homer
Shirley May to
Try Channel'
DOVER, Eng.-(AP)-Shirley May
France is all set for her second
attempt to swim the English Chan-
nel.
The 17-year-old Massachusetts
Blonde hopes to conquer the
treacherous 19-mile strip between
France and England before her
next birthday, on Friday. If she
does she will be the youngest girl
ever to have swum the channel.
SHIRLEY is apt to have plenty
of company. Waiting to go on the
French side are a Turkish student,
Murlat Guler, and a San Diego,
Calif., stenographer, Florence
Chadwick.
In the Dover line, besides Shir-
ley, are Philip Mickman, 18-year
old English boy who swam the
Channel a year ago, and Alfonso
Cruz of Guatemala.
All are hoping for a try this
coming week, when the Old Mar-

Tigers Stagger to 9-8 Winl
As Indians Scalp Yanks, 4-2Z

.I

iner's calendar shows the tides will
be favorable for swimming.

I

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
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Figure 5 average words to a ine.
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Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11.30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
BUSINESS
SERVICES

BUSINESS SERVICES

I
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Read Daily Classifieds

NEW YORK -(A)- Home runs
played a vital part in the teeming
National League pennant race yes-
terday.
Mike Goliat blasted a two-run
homer to give the league-leading
Philadelphia Phils a 2-1 decision
over the fourth place St. Louis
Cardinals.
HOME RUNS by Carm Mauro
and Andy Pafko in the 13th inning
gave the Chicago Cubs a 4-2 vic-
tory over the second place Boston
Braves and dropped the Braves
four games behind the Phils.
Fifth inning home runs by
Bobby Adams and Danny Lit-
whiler were theadeciding factors
in the Cincinnati Reds' 4-3 con-
quest of the third place Brook-
lyn Dodgers. The Dodgers now
trail the Phils by four-and-one-
half games.
In the other National League
game big Jim Hearn pitched the
New York Giants to a one-hit, 5-0
victory over the Pittsburgh Pir-
ates. Bob Dillinger collected the
Pirate hit, a leadoff single to left
in the first inning.
GOLIAT'S BLAST broke up a
pitching duel between the Cards'
Gerry Staley and Russ Meyer. The
Cards scored their lone run in the
seventh on singles by Eddie Miller,
Glen Nelson and Del Rice. The
Cards knocked Meyer out in the
ninth, putting two on with one out.
Jim Konstanty came on for his
47th appearance of the year and
retired the side.
Big Paul Minner went all the
way for the Cubs against the
Braves, scattering 12 hits. Form-
er Cub Bob Chipman started, for
Boston and left for a pinch-.
hitter in the ninth. Bob Hogue
served up the home run balls.
Pafko's clout was his 25th.
Herm Wehmeier scattered seven
Dodger hits in posting his ninth
win and fourth over Brooklyn for
Cincinnati. Adams and Litwhiler
connected off Preacher Roe who
went down to his seventh loss. Gil
Hodges socked a two-run homer
for the Dodgers.
HEARN, BOUGHT for $10,000
from the Cards a few weeks ago,
was never in trouble against the
Pirates. He walked five and fanned
six. The Giants scored two runs
in the first to clinch the game.
The victory was Hearn's third
World Swim
Mark Broken
TOKYO, Sunday, Aug. 6-()-
Japan's Hironoshin Furuhashi beat
the world's record for the 400-
meter freestyle swim last night.
But the U.S. virtually clinched the
dual meet by piling up a point-
score lead of 31-11.
The three-day competition winds
up with four events tonight: the
800-meter freestyle, the 100-meter
freestyle, the 200-meter backstroke
and the 800-meter relay.

for the Giants. His other tri-
umphs were a four-hitter against
the Reds and a two-hit shutout
over Chicago.
Meanwhile, the Detroit Tigers
staggered to a 9-8 victory over
the Washington Senators to stay
2% games out in front in the
American League race.
THE TIGERS piled up an 8-1
lead bu Fred Hutchinson couldn't
hold it and was knocked out in a
four run Senator seventh. Hal
Newhouser doused that flame but
was rocked in the ninth as the
Senators scored three runs. New-
houser fanned Mickey Vernon on a
bitterly - contested called third
strike with the tying run on third
to end the game.
Detroit slugged three Wash-
ington pitchers for 14 hits. Vic
Wertz banged his 23rd homer
and drove in his 100th run. Ion
Kolloway drove in three runs
while collecting a triple' and two
singles.
The Cleveland Indians recaptur-
ed second place from New York by
beating the Yanks, 4-2, on a eighth
inning homer by Larry Doby, his
second of the game and 16th of the
year.
DOBY HIT his first homer in
the fourth inning and Joe Gordon
banged one in the fifth to give the
Indians a 2-0 lead. The yanks tied
it up with two in the seventh but
Doby then socked his second of the
game with Al Rosen on base and
two out in the eighth to break up
the game.
Early Wynn stopped the Yanks
on four hits to post his 12th vie-
tory.4 Relief pitcher Allie Rey-
nolds was the loser.
The Boston Red Sox trounced
the Chicago White Sox, 12-7. The
Red Sox blended 12 hits along with
12 walks to win. The men of
O'Neill sewed up the game with a
seven run rally in the seventh inn-
ing. Chico Carrasquel of the White
Sox collected one of his team's 14
hits to extend his consecutive game
hitting streak to 23.

TED WILLIAMS
. ..in a bath
The Boston Red Sox star is
still recuperating from the arm
injury incurred in the All-Star
Game. He is shown here taking
whirlpool treatment for his ail-
ment.
Eagles Picked
ByTwo TD's 0
In All-Star Go
CHICAGO-(P)-T h e mighty
Philadelphia Eagles are favored
by two touchdowns, but the College
All-Stars have the brawn and
skill to uncork an upset in next
Friday night's football season
opener at Soldier Field.
One of the heaviest All-Star
squads in the classic's 17-year
history, boasting such backfield
greats as Charley Justice, Doak
Walker, and. Emil Sitko could de-
feather the. proud champion Ea-
gles of the National Football Lea-
gue.
LAST YEAR, the Eagles humil-
iated Mud Wilkinson's All-Stars
38-0, for the 11th professional tri-
umph in the series. The last All-
Star win was a 16-0, decision over
the Chicago Bears in 1947.
This season, the All-Star
Coaches, headed by Eddie An-
derson of Holy Cross, recom-
mended that the All-Star squad,
previously numbersing an un-
wieldy total of more than 70, be
trimmed to 50. The training site
also was switched fro Evans-
ton, Ill., to Delafield, Wis., many
miles farther from distracting
Chicago entertainment.
As a result, quarterbacking
which in the past has been quite
an All-Star problem has been
smooth in workouts. Anderson has
three top-notch passers and ball-
handlers in Travis Tidwell of Au-
burn, Adrian Burk of Baylor and
Eddie Le Baron, College of Pacific.
A's Beaten, 4-0
ST. LOUIS-P)-Alex Kellner
gave up but one hit in the first
six innings last nightb ut then he
crumbled in the seventh as the
St. Louis Browns beat Philadel-
phia 4-0. The winning pitcher was
Stubby Overmire, who registeredj
his first shutout of the year.

CHICAGO-({P)-Herman Kei-
ser of Lima, Ohio, and Dave Dou-
glas of Wilmington, Dela.. yester-
day posted formidable two-under-'
par 70's to share the early lead
in the $15,000 All-American pro
golf tourney.
Tam O'Shanter's trickily placed
pins over the par 36-36 - 72
course caused considerable trou-
ble for the field of about 90 pros
who started the 72-hole chase or'
top swag of $2,500.
* * *
KEISER, 36, 1946 winner of the
Masters' tourney and slim, blonde
Douglas, 32, a golf pro's son, fired
identical cards of 36-34.
Co-favored Lloyd Mangrum
of the host club, and British
Open Champion Bobby Locke,
making his first American ap-
pearance in more than a year,
were tied at even par 72 with
Ed Furgol, Royal Oak, Mich.
Among those bracketed at 73
were Jimmy Demaret, Pete Coo-
per, Jack Burke, Jr., Ed Oliver,
Skip Alexander and Skee Riegel.
BUNCHED AT 74 were such
shooters as national PGA Cham-
pion Chandler Harper,' Johnny
Bulla, Jimmy Clark, the qualify-
ing leader with 66; Jimmy Hines,
Dick Mayer and Claude Harmon.
It was a day of surprising
blow-ups. Among these were
Furgol's soaring from an open-
ing 32, four under par, to a
back nine 40, four over par, and
Jimmy Turnesa's sky-rocketing
from a 34 to 41 for 75.
Keiser, a navy veteran of three
years, bagged four birdies but had
two one-over-pars.
* * *
DOUGLAS, 17th among the na-
tion's money winners with an av-
erage of 72.15 for 74 tourney
rounds, sailed easily to his 70. His
first of three birdies came on the
par five second where he dropped
a edge shot six feet from the pin
and sank the putt. His only bogey
was on the 445-yard fourth where
he needed a five.
In the concurrent All-Ameri-
can amateur tourney, British
Amateur, Champion Frank 'Stra-
nahan ofT oledo, fashioned a

second round 73 for a half-
way total of even par '144.
The third round of the All-
American women's tourney found
Babe Z a h a r i a s sky-rocketing
ahead with a 54-hole total of 220,
nine strokes ahead of runner-up
Louise Suggs, the defending cham-
pion from Carrollton.
STRANAIAN, striving for his
third straight All-American crown,
led a simon-pure field of 30 by a
single stroke. Four were tied in
the runner-up spot at 145.
Mrs. Zaharias dropped a 40-
footer on the 18th hole yester-
day for a third-round 74, two-
under women's par. Babe broke
her own course record with a
70 in Thursday's first round and
Friday had a 70.
Miss Suggs took the no. 2 spot
also with a 74 for her 229. Knot-
ted at 233 were Patty Berg with
a third round 76 and the top ama-
teur Beverly Hanson of Pasadena,
Calif., who needed at 79.
Mathias Shows
Stuiff to Swiss
BERN, Switzerland-(IP)-B o b
Mathias of Tulare, Calif., demon-
strated his all-around track abil-
ity again yesterday to take a long
halfway lead in the Swiss decath-
lon championships.
Performing on a track heavy
from recent rains, the young Oly-
mpic champion won the 400 meter
run, the shot putt and high jump.
He finished second in theĀ°100 me-
ter dash and third in the broad
jump.
He amassed a total of 3,822
points to gain a lead over Swit-
zerland's Armin Scheurer, who
had 3,391. Third was Otto Rebula
of Yugoslavia with 3,374.

c
0
0

CONTINUOUS FROM 1

P.M.

. ti.. ...:Fi. }

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Negotiate for
La~ilotta Bout

I

WIRE RECORDER-Ph. 8426, leave mes-I
sage. )4W'

I

NEW YORK-(AP)-The Inter-
national Boxing Club said yester-
day that Middleweight Champion
Jake La Motta might meet Lau-
rent Dauthville of France in a ti-
tle bout at Detroit in September.
The IBC hasn't given up hope
of signing La Motta and Sugar
Ray Robinson for a middleweight
championship bout in New York
next month, a spokesman said.
* * *
NEGOTIATIONS STILL are un-
der way for the Robinson bout,
he said, but financial terms sought
by both sides are blocking pro-
gress.
Dauthuille defeated La Motta in
Montreal, knocked out Steve Bel-
loise, and kayoed Tuzo Portuguez
twice.

STARTS TODAY
7HE SON OF ROBIN HOOD,
}{ leads his Merry Men
to new loves and glory: R k
through arrows, ambush, ;Z
swords and treachery!
et
PICTURES
presents
'*
/LO
SkY" ::r: .~

TYPEWRITERS
RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
REPAIRED
STUDENT SUPPLIES
G.i. Requisitions
Accepted on Supplies Only
MORRILL'S
314 S. State St. Ph. 7177
fountain pens repaired

f
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Dpartment of Speech
presents

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5
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" The Great Adventure
n...ma bydNnlIt RFNNT I

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____ ... .... 1

11

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