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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 06, 1950 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-08-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICrGAN DAILY

'OLLEGE ROUND-UP:
SJimCrow, YP Provide Campus Topics

By PAUL MARX
Jim Crow laws are still effective
Louisiana State University.
Twelve Negroes were denied ad-
ission to LSU last week when the
iiversity's board of supervisors
topted a resolution ,ruling that
ursuant to the laws .of Louisi-
la and the policies of this board
e administrative officers are
reby directed to deny admission".

to the twelve applicants. 'It is ex-
pected that this ruling will be
fought in the courts.
The University of Texas, which
recently admitted Negroes to its
graduate schools but maintains
that if courses are offered any-
where in the state on a segregated
basis, Negroes applying to the uni-
versity for study in those fields
must attend the Negro schools, had

a courageous editorial on the issue
in the campus paper.
"The LSU case involves stu-
dents the majority of whom are

veterans who fought in the last
war. They are as good Ameri-
cans as any of the rest of us.
They are entitled to equal edu-
cation. The device of prolonged
court action only brands seg-
ments of the South as unwilling
to yield to what is--to enlighten-
ed and fairminded people--just
and fair for all Americans," it
said.

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PANTIE GIRDLE

The University of Minnesota
Daily is up in arms about the ac-
tivities of the Young Progressives
on their campus. The YP's, who
have a total membership of six
students this summer, have cre-
ated such an uproar in circulating
the "Stockholm Peace Appeal"
that the Daily has labeled their
activities "a- crime against the
school."
* * * -
The University of Colorado is a
bit peeved over the reporting of
campus happenings by the press
in the Rocky Mountain area. The
Rocky Mountain News was attack-
ed for presenting Colorado as "a
playground for drunken, carefree,
children of rich men, who, ambi-
guously enough are interested in
furthering the cause of Soviet
Russia."
In a so-called attempt to develop
a well-integrated student before he
embarks on a specialized program,
the University of Washington has
devised a two-year, "general edu-
cation" program. Under the new
curriculum freshmen will be al-
lowed to study exclusively in one
of three distinct fields, humani-
ties, social sciences, or physical or
biological sciences for two years
before specializing in a particular
subject.

with
WENDY OWEN
Sister Kenny gave a young polio
patient the thrill of her life when
they were formally introduced
d u r i n g the performance of
"Chance of a Lifetime" last week,
Jvhen she was formally introduced
to the great woman whose paraly-
sis cure has worked marvels.
And Sister Kenny used the
time to tell American audiences
of the acceptance of her meth-
ods by nations abroad. She re-
vealed that "Lancet," the offi-
cial publication of the British
Medical Association and neuro-
logists in Belgium had both re-
ported favorably on her tech-
nique.
Also, she noted that 18 Kenny
clinics are in operation behind the
Iron Curtain.
* * *
F I F T E E N YEAR-OLD films
have brought new fame and for-
tune to Bill "Hopalong Cassidy"
Boyd, when a television revival of
his old films brought him into the
hearts of young America.
Although various Indian tribe
leaders have been raising a
ruckus in Washington because
these old films show the braves
in the now out-dated blood-
curdling light, the cowboy and
Indian film has enjoyed a tre-
mendous renaissance.
Bill Boyd, who started in film-
dom as an extra for C. B. DeMille,
has been riding the crest of the
wave; and small children no long-
er feel well dressed without one
"Hoppy" T-shirt in their posses-
sion.
* * *
A SERIES of eight operas,
starting with Carmen, will be tele-
cast this fall and winter over NBC-
TV. Also to be shown are Ann Ar-
bor favorites "Gianni Schicchi"
and "Hansel and Gretel." Peter
Adler, who will be music and ar-
tistic director, promises that sing-
ers will be chosen for their ability
to portray the roles before the in-
timate eye of the camera.

Bread Box Scrounger

SUNDAY, AUGUST 6, 1950
DEXTER PLAYS ETLER:
'U' Pianist To Perform
With Stanley Quartet

Pianist Benning Dexter, of the
music school, will make a guest
appearance with the S t a n l e y
Quartet to introduce a new com-
position by Alvin Etler, at 8:30
p.m. Tuesday in the Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
Prof. Dexter has been at the
University since 1946. Previously
he was at San Jose State College.
and was connected with both the
Julliard School of Music and the
Philadelphia Conservatory.
While in the Army he conducted
his own program over Radio Tok-
yo.
ETLER, WHOSE "Quintet for
piano and string quartet," will be
premiered Tuesday has studied un-
der such modern masters as Paul
Hindemuth and Arthur Shepherd.
At present a professor of mu-
sic at Smith College, he has re-
ceived two Guggenheim Fellow-
ships, and taught at Yale and,,
Cornell Universities.
The balance of Tuesday's per-

m

formance will include Mozart's
"Quartet in D minor. K. 421," and
Beethoven's "Quartet in C major,
Op. 59, No. 3" and will be played
by Emil Raab, Gilbert Ross, 'Paul
Doktor and Oliver Edel of the mu-
sic school.
The performance will be open
to the public.
FRATERNITY
u JEWELR(Y
SOUVENIRS - GIFTS
TRADITIONAL. MUGS
DIAMONDS - WATCHES
CUPS --TROPHIES
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University
- "Home of the
Official Michigan Ring"
Summer Hours, ten till five;
^ closed Saturdays.
Read Daily Classifiedst

LAST WEEK OF

h YEARLY

CLEARANSCE
MONDAY SPECIAL

r{

/e VAN BUREN Sh/
8 Nickels Arcade

Haven Hall Recalls Memories

c aim

4

's l
A
.141'

(Continued from Page 1)
most bitterly attacked and hotly
defended traditions of Michigan.
Many a coed has been virtual-
ly thrown out of the front door
trying to get in, but last summer
one woman, a lawyer and gleeful
debunker of "sacred" traditions,
walked right in and gut of the
front door and wasn't even rep-
rimanded.
A simple walk around the cam-
pus will strike the stroller with
many memory-filled monument,
dedication or plaque.
STARTING from the northwest
corner, near Haven Hall, the first
thing to meet the beholder is a
big rock, without a word on it. It
happens to be the honorary so-
ciety Druids' "sculling" stone,
which Druid initiates are required
to wash-with tooth brushes.
Under the flagpole, whose rope
it's become a tradition to steal,
Natators Face
ColdestSwim
ST. IGNACE, Mich.-(JP)-Mi-
chigan's coldest swim, the annual
Straits of Mackinac ,marathon,
will test the endurance of a dele-
gation of mid-west enthusiasts
next Saturday.
Charles McCaffree, Jr., Michi-
gan State College swimming coach
who directs the Straits contest,
said he expects a large but still
undetermined number of entries.
DURING THE first two years
of the affair, 1948 and 1949, only
a half dozen out of 68 starters
were able to finish the 4'/ mile
grind.
The 1949 winner, Californian
]Walter Stewart, holds a mark of
two hours and ten minutes.
The swim will highlight a two-
day Straits of Mackinac celebra-
tion presided over by Queen Deane
Taylor, an 18-year-old brunette
from St. Ignace.
Miss Taylor is visiting Detroit
and Lansing over the weekend to
publicize the celebration.

lies the Scabbard and Blade rock,
where initiates to the ROTC
society are given the once-over.
The Engine Arch, cutting right
through the West Engineering
Building, isn't even an arch but
"The Denison Archway," in mem-
ory of Prof. Charles S. Denison,
who suggested it. Other memory
plaques adorn the inside walls of
the arch.
* * *
HIDDEN BEHIND a group of
trees just east of the General Li-
brary is a monument of a broken
column, signifying its dedication
to four University professors who
died in the middle of their careers:
On the other side of the Library
is a group of 48 trees, which are
planted, believe it or not, in sev-
eral circles, surrounding the Tap-
pan Oak, which was planted and
dedicated by the class of 1858 in
honor of Henry P. Tappan, presi-
dent at that time.
But the biggest and most-to-be-
remembered tradition is the Mich-
igan Memorial Phoenix Project, a
plan for peace time use of atomic
energy, which is rapidly spreading
throughout the country and to
many more people than the thou-
sands of Michigan students, facul-
ty, alumni and friends.
Engineers to Meet
There will be a meeting of the
Ann Arbor Engineer's Club at 8:30
p.m., Tuesday in the Michigan Un-
ion.
Chief Ben J. Bahn of the Ann
Arbor Fire Department will speak
on "The Problem of Fires and
Equipment." The meeting will be
open to all engineers and their as-
sociates.
Guard Still Open
LANSING-(AP)-Men eligible for
immediate draft or reserve call
still can join the Michigan Nation-
al Guard, Col. Howard E. Derby,
Guard Chief of Staff, said yester-
day.
Men joining the Guard would
serve with men from their own
communities.

--AP News Pnoto
SMART RODENT GETS VITTLES-Whoever said squirrels were
dumb didn't know the one above, who proved otherwise when he
got curious at a bread box left outside one day (top picture), used
his woodland shrewdness, plus his hands and head to get the lid
up '(middle picture) and sat triumphantly munching his dinner
(bottom picture).
VISITING PASTORS:
Korean Discussions, Picnics
Top Week's Church Activities

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Picnic - meetings, supper - pro-
grams and discussions of the vari-
ous aspect sof the Korean situa-
tion are on the agenda for the
churches this week.
The First Baptist Church will
hold a picnic-meeting at 6 p.m.
today in the backyard of the
church. In the absence of Rev. C.
H. Loucks, guest preacher Rev.
Ralph Williams, pastor of the Uni-
ted Church of Canada in Espan-
ola, Ontario, will speak on "Faith
in the Future" on today, which
will be broadcast over radio station
WHRV from 11:30 to 12 noon.
THE CONGREGATIONAL, Dis-
ciples, Evangelical and Reformed
Guild will hold a supper-meeting
at 6 p.m. today in the Congrega-
tional Church. Roger Heyns of the
psychology department will speak
on "Christianity and Human Re-
lations."
The Episcopal Student Foun-
dation will hold a picnic at Par-
ish Field with cars leaving at
4:30 p.m. today from the Can-
terbury House at 218 N. Division
St.
A small but unique religious
community within itself, Parish
Field is located near Brighton and
religious retreats and conferences
are held weekly.
THE LUTHERAN Student Asso-
ciation will hold an outdoor meet-
ing at 4 p.m. today at Prof. R.
Hammett's cottage at Strawberry
Lake with cars leaving from the
Center.
A supper-program of Gamma
Delta, the Lutheran Student

Club, will consist of a discussion
of "Christianity Behind the Iron
Curtain" whicr will be led by
Leona Eisele at 5:30 p.m. today.
* The First Presbyterian Church
will have Rev. James Van Pernis
as their guest preacher today. His
topic will be "Moments of Reali-
zation"' at 10:45 a.m.
THE ANN ARBOR Council of
Churches will hold a meeting at
7:45 p.m. Tuesday at Lane Hall.
Prof. Kenneth Boulding of the
depratment of economics will
speak on "Why Do People Differ
About War and Peace?"
Sponsored by a newly formed
group concerned over the estab-
lishment of better relationships
between nations, the Ann Arbor
Council of Churches guards
against becoming limited in its
outlook by encouraging participa-
tion of all who have opinions to
share or those who seek con-
structive alternatives to the end-
less series of conflicts in recent
years, according to a Council
spokesman.

50 DRESSES
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