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June 29, 1950 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-06-29

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71m j eTHE MICHIGAN DAILY

.__. _ _ w ... ~

Tigers Win With Houtteman, 6-2

King Arthur Posts 10th;
YanksStop Senators

f ##Brooks Trip Giants, 5-3
:}! Cubs Whip Cards, 15-3

D 'ETROIT-(IP)-A r t Houtte-1
man, the Detroit Tigers' classy1
righthander, became the first 10-1
game winner in the major leagues
this season as he turned back the,
Chicago White Sox, 6-2.
The victory protected Detroit's
four and a half game lead in the1
American League race as second-
place New York also won
* *.*
IT WAS the fourth triumph in;
a row for the 22-year-old Houtte-
man who has lost five games.
Powerful batting support from
Hoot Evers and Don Kolloway
broke up Houtteman's pitching
duel with Ken Holcombe and
sent the Tigers on their way to
their third straight win over
the Chicagoans.
Evers' 14th homer, a 420-foot
inside-the-park wallop, drove 'two
runs across in the fifth inning to
break a 1-1 deadlock. Don Kol-
loway added two more in the
sixth on his third homes into the
left field stands.
HOUTTEMAN, coasting along
on a 6-1 lead, yielded a run and
two singles in the ninth, but bore
dwn then to protect his victory.
American L e a g u e batting1
champion George Kell had a
double and two singles in four
times at bat to boost his league-
leading average.
Chicago jumped off to a one
run lead in the first inning on dou-'
bles by Billy Fox and Gus Zernial.
DETROIT equalized that score
1. the third as Johnny Lipon
doubled and moved to third on
GCrry Priddy's infield hit. Lipon
E " ored on Kell's long fly to ,right.
The Tigers broke the game
wide open in the three run fifth.
Here is how they did it:
With one out, Priddy singled.
Kell singled to right sending Prid-
dy to third. When shortstop Alex
Carrasquel tried to pick Kell off
at first after Kell turned towards
second, he threw wildly with Prid-
dy scoring and Kell taking second
on the error.
WERTZ FLIED out but Evers
t ien tagged one that bounced off
the fence at the 420 foot mark for
his second inside-the-park homer'
In a week. That scored Kell and
mde it a 4-1 game.
j * *"
YANKEES 5, SENATORS 1
NEW YORK -(P)- Allie Rey-
nolds, veteran New York right-
Rizzuto Gains
Over Stephens
In All-Star Poll
CHICAGO-(P)-Phil Rizzuto of
the New York Yankees yesterday
gained a wide lead over Boston's
S Vern Stephens in the stretch run
for the starting American League
shortstop position in the 17th All-
Stare ame here July 11.
Heavy balloting in New York en-
abled Rizzuto to pull away from
The diminutive Yankee infielder's
Entries are now being taken,
for intramural softball playing.
Fraternity, independent a n d
dormitory teams are welcome to
enter. Contact Don Robinson at
the Intramural Sports Building.
Phone 8109.
total soared to 608,323 as compar-
the Red Sox star by 64,875 votes.
ed to 543,448 for Stephens.
The total vote in the national
poll, which ends at midnight Sat-
urday, rose to 2,161,497.
The New York returns also
boosted Roy Campanella, Brook-

lyn's catcher, to the top spot in the
National League, with 561,327
Larry "Yogi" Berra, Yankee
catcher, holds an advantage of
60,977 votes over Birdie Tebbetts
of the Red Sox, due principally to
New York's heavy support. Phil.
Masi, Chicago White Sox, third
with 281,357, is gaining steadily.

hander, pitched a three-hitter yes-
terday as the Yankees defeated
the Washington Senators, 5-1, to
even their series at one victory
apiece.
But for the wildness in the fifth
inning, Reynolds would have
pitched a shutout. A single and
three straight walks forced in the
only Senator run. Washington had
a good chance to break the game
wide open but Sam Mele popped
out with the bases loaded to end
the threat.
Allie was involved in a tight
pitching duel with Al Sima, left-
handed rookie fresh from Chatta-
nooga of the Southern Associa-
tion, for seven innings. The Yanks
held a 2-1 lead that far, with the
aid of an un-earned run.
But Sima lost his touch in the
eighth and gave up three more
runs. Two crossed as Jerry Cole-
man slammed his fifth homer into
the left field stands.
PHILADELPHIA - (A') Steve
O'Neill's Boston Red Sox swept to
their sixth straight victory ,last
night, defeating the Philadelphia
Athletics 6 to 2. Home runs by
Ted Williams (no. 23), Vern Ste-
phens (no. 17) and DomDimag-
gio (no. 3) helped send Lou Bris-
sie down to his 12th defeat of the
season.
Ellis Kinder survived an 11-hit
Philadelphia attack to recgrd his
sixth victory against seven- de-
feats for the Sox.
All but one of the Bostofi runs
scored on homers. Dimaggio -con-
nected in the third with one on
to put the Red Sox out in front
but the A's deadlocked the game
at 2-2 before Williams' two-run
homer in the eighth sewed up the
game.
Stephlens honmered for insu)r-
ance and the Sox added another
tally in the ninth on a walk, a
sacrifice and a single by Dimag-
gio.
* * *
INDIANS 18, BROWNS 2
ST. LOUIS - (P) - A four-run
rally on a homer, two doubles and
a single in the first inning was just
the beginning as the Cleveland In-
dians mauled the St. Louis Browns
18 to 2 last night. The big inning
was the seventh when 15 Indians
paraded to the plate and knocked
in 11 runs. It was Bog Lemon's
10th triumph.
MAJOR LEAGUE
STANDINGS
AMERICAN LEAGUE

ALLIE REYNOLDS
. . . three-hitter
'M' Sailors
Call .fo'r New
Tars Tonigoht
By NORM MANGOUNI
University of Michigan sailors,
back in Ann Arbor after their fifth
place finish in the national regatta
on the West Coast last week, to-
day issued a call for new mem-
bers.
An open meeting at 7:30 p.m.
today in Rm. 311, West Engineer-
ing Building, will scrve as an in-
troduction to interested students.
* * *
THE WOLVERINE tars,. mid-
western collegiate champions, tal-
lied 319/2 points in the three-day
meet at the Newport Yacht Club,
Newport, Calif., but were never in
Co-recreation will be held at
the Intramural Sports Building
tomorrow night from 7:30 to
9:30 p.m.
a challenging position and placed
fifth behind Yale, California,
George Washington, and M. L. T.
The Yale Elis scored a total of
403 points to repeat as team
champions and retain the Morss
.Bowl, emblematic of college din-
ghy racing supremacy. Califor-
nia's host Bears finished one
point off the pace with 402,
George Washington was third
with 381, and M. I. T. wound up
fourth with 360.
Michigan, Ohio State, and Den-
ison were the midwest's represen-
tatives in the 12-team title race.
Denison's Big Reds placed eighth
while the Ohio State Buckeyes
were ninth.
Jim Johns skippered Michigan's
'A' division entries and was rated
ninth among the regatta's 22 pilots
at thenmeet's close. Gene O'Con-
nor and Bob Allen guided the
Wolverine crafts in' the 'B' races.
Read Daily Classifieds

BROOKLYN -(p)- Gene Her-
manski's first home run of the
year broke a deadlock between
Preacher Roe and Sheldon Jones
in the seventh inning and gave
Brooklyn a 5-3 victory over New
York yesterday.
Brooklyn outfielder Carl Furillo
was beaned by Jones in the eighth
inning and was carried off the
field on a stretcher. Pending the
development of x-rays at Swedish
Hospital, the Dodger right fielder
is not believed to be seriously in-
jured. However, he has a bump
behind the right ear.
Furillo has been hitting .500
since the Brooks returned home
and in his two previous trips to the
plate he banged out a two-run
homer and a single. Jackie Robin-
son accounted for the first Brook-
lyn run by scoring on a short fly
ball to Tookie Gilbert behind first
base.
The score was tied at 3-3 when
Hermanski hit his four bagger
with a mate on base.
CHICAGO-(IP) The Chicago
Cubs rolled up their biggest scor-
ing total of the season yesterday
as they massacred the St. Louis
Cardinals, 15 to 3, before a ladies
day crowd of 25,062 that included
12,109 paid.
While Doyle Lade went the
route, scattering nine hits, the
Cubs walloped George Munger,
Cloyd Boyer and Jim Hearn for
15 hits. They included three ho-
mers, a triple and four doubles for
a total of 30 bases.
ROY SMALLEY topped the as-
sault with his 12th homer, a tri-
ple, double and single in five times
up. The other homers were no. 7
for Phil Cavarretta and no. 10
for Andy Pafko. The first eight
Cub runs were powered across on
home runs.
Smalley hit a two-run homer
in the second and Cavarretta
belted his with two on in tha
third to rout Munger for his
fifth loss against three wins. Bo-
yer stopped the Cubs momen-
tarily and then Hearn was
whacked for a three-run homer
by Pafko in the fifth.
That was only the beginning for
Hearn. Manager Eddie Dyer left
him in there while he was lather-
ed for 10 runs on as many hits in
the final four Cub innings.

blasted in the fourth, Fox seemed
on his way to his second win
against six defeats.
Frank Smith, who relieved Fox,
was greeted with a triple by Buc
second baseman Danny Murtaugh.
After Jack Phillips had lined out
pinchhitter Johnny Hopp tripled
to score Murtaugh and make it
5-5. Relief pitcher Murry Dickson,
who received credit for the win,
was allowed to bat for himself and
grounded out. Then Rojek's
screaming double scored the win-
ning run.
Pittsburgh's srtaetr Bill Werle
was relieved by Dickson who gave
up only two hits in the last 52/3
innings.
BRAVES 3, PHILLIES 1
BOSTON-(AP)-Johnny Sain be-
came the first National Leaguer to
pitch ten victories last night as
the Boston Braves whipped Phila-
delphia, 3-1, and knocked the Phil-
lies back into second place behind
Brooklyn who whipped New York,
5-3, in an afternoon game.
The Phils outhit the Tribesmen
8-5 but the locals bunched two of
theirs with a pair of walks and an
error for all their runs in the third
inning.
The Quakers scored their only
run in the second on three singles,
one of them tainted.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Summer Session, Room 3510 Admin-
the day preceding publication (11:00
istration Building, by 3:00 p.m. on
a.m. Saturdays).
THURSDAY, JUNE 29, 1950
VOL. LX, No. 104
Notices
Standards of Conduct:
All Students, Graduate and Un-
dergraduate, are notified of the
following Standards of Conduct:
Enrollment in the University
carries with it obligations in re-
gard to conduct not only inside but
outside the classrooms and stu-
dents are expected to conduct
themselves in such a manner as
to be a credit to themselves and
to the University. They are amen-
able to the laws governing the
community as well as to the rules
and orders of the University of-
ficials, and they are expected to
observe the standards of conduct
approved by the University.
Whenever a student, group of
students, society, fraternity, or
other student organization fails to
observe either the general stand-
ards of conduct as above outlined
or any specific rules which may
be adopted by the proper Univer-
sity authorities, or conducts him-
self or itself in such a manner as
to make it apparent that he or it
is not a desirable member or part
of the University, he or it shall be

Exchange and Guest Dinners
may be held in organized student
residences between 5:30 p.m. and
8 p.m. for weekday dinners and be.
tween 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. for Sun-
day dinners. While guest chaper-
ons are not required groups with-
out resident house directors must
announce these events to the Of-
fice of Student Affairs at least
one day in advance of the schedul-
ed date.
Calling Hours for Women in
Men's Residences. In Men's Resi-
dence Halls - daily between 3
p.m. and 10:30 p.m. In Nelson In-
ternational House - Friday, 8
p.m.-12 p.m.; Saturday, 2:30 p.m.-
5:30 p.m. and from 8 p.m.-12 p.m.;
Sunday, 1 p.m..1:30 p.m.
Social Events sponsored by stu-
dent organizations at which both
men and women are to be present
must be approved by the Dean of
Students. Application forms and
a copy of regulations governing
these events may be secured in the
Office of Student Affairs, Room
1020, Administration Building. Re-
quests for approval must be sub-
mitted to that office no later than
noon of the Monday before the
event is scheduled. A list of ap-
proved social events will be pub-
lished in The Daily Official Bul-
letin on Wednesday of each week.
Student organizations are noti-
fied that activities should be

liable to disciplinary action by the1
proper University authorities. Spe-
cific rules of conduct which must
be observed are:
Women Guests in Men's Resi-
dences. The presence of women
guests in men's residences, except
for exchange and guest dinners or
for social events or during calling
hours approved by the Office of
Student Affairs, is not permitted.
This regulation does not apply to
mothers of residents.(Committee
on Student Conduct, January 28,
1947.)

{ ,, ..

scheduled so as not to fall within
the ten days before the close o
the Summer Session on Auguit 18
Approvals will not be granted dur
ing this period.
The U.S. Civil Service Commis
sion announces the following ex,
aminations :
Library Assistant, grades GS-2
GS-3 and GS-4, closing date, Aug
2.
Deputy United States Marsha
GS-5, closing date July 12.
Oceanographer, Grades OS-
through GS-15, no closing date
Kern County, California announ
ces a position available for Drafts
man, Grade II (Planning Commis
sion). Applicants must have ha
at least four years of recent ful
time experience in an engineering
assessor's office or a similar of
fice where the duties involved ma
drafting, etc.
For additional information o
the above announcements, pleas
call at the Bureau of Appoint
ments, 3528 Administration Bldg
Art Reprint Collection: All stu
dents registered for the Summe
Session, '50, at the University ar
eligible to rent framed print
from the Student Art Reprin
Library. The library has 72
framed prints in its collection
(Continued on Page 4)
WANT TO
FLY?0
U. of M. Flying Club can teach
you to fly at reduced summer
rates.
Plane rentals at half the normal
cost . . . Demonstration flights.
Phone HAROLD AVEN
2-2202 or 3-8212
for information TODAYI

I

h

al
_ _..

i

3 £4uare lIteal4 pder14av

$

.50

Detroit
New York
Cleveland
laoston
Washington
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia

w
43
40
37
38
29
27
21
22

L
19
25
27
30
35
37
41
43

Pct.
.694
.615
.578
.559
.453
.422
.339
.338

GB
4i%
7
8
15
17
22
221/

PIRATES 6, REDS 5
PITTSBURGH-()-The Pitts-
burgh Pirates rallied for two runs
in the eighth last night to edge
the Cincinnati Reds 6-5 before a
sparse crowd of 12,040. The payoff
blow was Stan Rojek's run-scor-
ing double with two men out.
Howie Fox, Cincinnati starting
pitcher, was taken out at the start
of the eighth because of a tiring
shoulder. Until that time, mostly
because of the three-run homer he
CAMPUS
OPTICIANS
Conveniently Located
222 Nickels Arcade
Phone 2-9116

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TODAY'S PITCHERS
Washington at New York -
Hudson (7-5) vs. Ostrowski (2-
Boston at- Philadelphia -
Stobbs (5-2) vs. Hooper (7-4).
Chicago at Detroit - Cain
(3-5) or Gumpert (z-4") vs.
Hutchinson (8-4-).
Cleveland at St. Louis (N) -
Wynn (6-4) or Gromek (3-2)
vs. Pil*ette (0-1).

5 days a week
LUNCH, DINNER
5 days a week

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SAMPLE DAY'S MENU

NATIONAL
w
Brooklyn 35
Philadelphia 35
St. Louis 36
Boston 33
Chicago 30
New York 30
Pittsburgh 23
Cincinnati 20

LEAGUE
L Pct. GB
24 .593 ...
25 .583 1/2
26 .5- /
28 .541 3
29 .508 5
30 .500 51/
39 .371 13%/
41 .328 16

STUDENT
BUNDLE!

Breakfast:

Lunch:

TODAY'S PITCHERS
New York at Brooklyn -
Koslo (7-5) vs. Hatten (1-2).
St. Louis at Chicago - Braz-
le (5-2) or Martin (2-1) vs.
Rush (8-6).
Philadelphia at Boston (N)
- Heintzelman (1-5) or Roberts
(9-3) vs. Bickford (6-6).

Choice of juice or fruit in season; cereal or egg; sweet roll or unlimited
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milk.
Cream of tomato soup, grapefruit juice, or tomato juice; meat loaf with
tomato sauce, breaded pork chop, stuffed veal bird, baked Virginia ham, or
cold plate; whipped potatoes or mashed sweet potatoes; fresh frozen broc-
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tomatoes, cottage cheese-peach salad, or tossed salad; unlimited bread;
butter; ice cream, sliced peaches, fruit jello, fruit in season; coffee tea, or
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SPAGHETTI (real Italian meat sauce)
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