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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 29, 1950 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-06-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THLTJSDAT, 3UN= 99; 1950b

* ___________________________________________________________________________ I __________________
I --.

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MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.

FOR SALE
13 LEFT-HANDED GOLF CLUBS and
bag. $15. Also bird cages. 562 S. Sev-
enth, Ph. 5330._________)11
FOR RENT
FURNISHED LIVING QUARTERS for
couple, 10 minutes from campus.
Complete use of house, laundry, kit-
chen. Immediate occupancy. Only
845 monthly. 1221 Prospect, Phone
2-3810. ) 4R
FOUR ROOM basement apartment to
rent furnished till Sept. 1st only.
927 Forest. )
MODERN, QUIET unfurnished apart-
ment near Stadium. Suitable for one
or two adults. Ph. 6197after_5:30. )2
2-ROOM SUITES-Living and sleeping
separate. Spacious, cross-ventilation,
linen, cleaning included. Newly re-
decorated. $5 weekly if two men, $8
s Enaly. One block from Rackham,
1034 East Huron, Ph. 2-8754. )

ROOM and BOARD
BOARD FOR LESS than $7.00 per week.
Rooming vacancies also available.
Apply at Robt. Owen Co-op House.
1017 Oakland. Ph. 7211. )1_____

PERSONAL

V-.". I

LOST & FOUND

LOST-Tuesday Evening-Diamond ring
setting in Hill Aud. or between Aud.
and Dental Bldg. Reward. Ph. 2-1032.
LOST - On Friday in Williams St.
Laundromat-Gold ring with Chinese
letters. Extremely anxious to have it
returned. Reward. Ph. Jose Bornn,
MusicSchool. _)___________
LOST-Argus G-3 in brown leather case.
About June 12 within the Arboretumi.
Reward. Box 222. )1
FOR SALE
FOR SALE OR RENT-Fraternity or
Sorority house. Will house 35 people.
East of campus. Ph. 2-0567. A. L.
McDonald, Broker. )13
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS, 2 for
$3.00; Nay "T" Shirts-45c; wash pants
-$2.99; wool swim trunks-$1.49. Open
'til 6 p.m. Sams Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington. ___)5____
Cousins on State Street
Featuring Genuine LEVI'S - $3.95
Companion Plaid Levi Shirts
$2.95 and $3.95 )3

WANTED - Men to eat in fraternity
house this summer. 1319 Cambridge
Rd. Rates very reasonable. Ph. 2-8312.
____)14
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist, at
308 S. State. Legal,' Masters, Doctors
dissertations, etc. Call 2-2615 or
_2-9848. )13
PSYCH OR SOC. MAJOR WANTED as
reader. 85c per hr. Call 7463. )12
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161 )1P
THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
did not burn down. You can still get
your special rates by calling 2-8242. )2
KIDDIE KARE-Reliable baby sitters.
Ph. 3-1121. )10B
TRANSPORTATION
CO-ED DESIRES DAILY RIDE from
Northwest Detroit, near Plymouth
Road, Webster 3-7043. )1
ROOM and BOARD
WOMEN STUDENTS - PERSONNEL -
Meals served Mort. thru. Fri., 119 Park
Terrace on Felch Park near Rackham.
Call 2-1017,8-noon or 4-6 p.m. )3X
ROOM WITH BOARD-Also board with-
out room. 2 meals per day, home
cooking. 1319 Hill. )2

d
o. r
.

BUSINESS
SERVICES

4 oTO

G LO T

HELP
WANTED

STUDENT TO WORK part tme for
meals. Ph. 3-8420.

ROOMS
FOR RENT

TWIN BED STUDY ROOM for men.
Private bath, near campus, inside
entrance._Ph. 2-0519 after 6. )16F
ATTRACTIVE ROOM-Private lavatory
and toilet, for professional or busi-
ness man. Private home in Washte-
_nawarea. Ph. 2-3868. )15F
SINGLE FOR MEN - Near campus.
Shower, use of refrigerator, $4 per
_week. Ph. 5750. ___)14F
ARE YOU LOOKING for a large, nicely
furnished, cool, comfortable room
for summer? Ph. 3-1937. )17F
SPACIOUS COOL ROOMS for Summer
session, four blocks from campus.
Semi-private baths with showers.
Cooking, laundry privileges, inner-
springs. 415 Lawrence. )13
THREE DOUBLE ROOMS for Fall. Very
close to campus $4, $4.50, $5.50 per
week. 412 Camden Court, Phone 7673.
) 12
TWO VERY LARGE ROOMS-Double
beds in each, private bath and en-
trance. Phone 6803. )11

WANT SINGING LESSONS?-Conserva-
tory trained singer recently of U. of
M. staff available for private instruc-
tion. Leslie Eitzen, Ypsi 792W. )13
WASHING-Finish work and ironing
also. Rough dry and wet washing.
Free pick up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020.
)1B
HILDEGARDEtSHOPPE-109 E. Wash-
ington. Custom Clothes and Altera-
tions. )3B
THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
offers special rates to STUDENTS and
FACULTY members for TIME, LIFE
and other magazines. Phone 2-8242.
_ )2
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company,
215 E. Liberty. p)4_
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales & Service
MORRILLS-314 S. State St. )4B
Read Daily Classifieds

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,lit /a41t!
STUDENT OWNED
AND MANAGED-...

COOL!

An unusual Motion
Picture as excitingly
different as its
title --

_ ..

Arts Course
Registration
Stays Open
Registration for the University's
three-week course in Contempor-t
ary Arts and Society will be open
throughout this week.
Sponsored jointly by the School<
of Architecture and Design, the
music school, the fine arts de-
partment and the English De-
partment, the course is designed
to give students an over-all sur-
vey and interpretation of the arts,
rather than the usual type of in-
struction, and will be held from
July 3 through July 21.
* * *
IT WILL BE OPEN to all in-
terested persons whether or not
they are enrolled for the summer
session and those wishing to re-
gister may contact Emil Weddige,
327 Arch.; James Wallace, 101
School of Music; Adelaide Adams,
206 Tappan Hall; or Richard C.
Boys, 2216 Angell Hall.
One hour of credit will be
given upon completion of the
course in any one of the four
departments provided the stu-
dent writes a paper on "The
Critical Evaluation of Con-
temporary Arts and Society,"
which will be due by July 28.
The course will consist of four
weekly lectures, held at 4:30 p.m.
in the architecture auditorium,
one weekly panel discussion at the
same time in the Rackham Lec-
ture Hall, and various related ac-
tivities.
THE FIRST Stanley Quartet
concert, July 11, will be part of
the program, as will the two mo-
vies "The Louisiana Story" and
"The Titan," a lecture on "Recent
Developments in American Jazz,"
and exhibitions in the Rackham
Galleries, the Museum of Art, the
Clements Library and the General
Library.
Three outstanding authorities
in art fields will participate in the
course. They are Prof. Ross Lee
Finney of the music school, Ed-
ward W. Rannells, head of the
art department at the University
of Kentucky; and John Ciardi,
contemporary poet.
Director Calls
For Choristers
The University Summer Choir,
meeting from four to five Monday
through Thursday in the Music
room of the Ann Arbor High
School needs more members, ac-
cording to director Henry Veld.
The greatest need is in the ten-
or and alto sections, Veld contin-
ued, but no one who cannot attend
all the weekly sessions should ap-
ply. One hour credit will be given
for membership in the choir.
* * *
THE GROUP is preparing a re-
petoire for a program to be given
the last Sunday of the summer
session. It will include modern
works by Samuel Barber, and Eric
De Lamarter, and classics like
Bach.
Veld, who is here as guest
conductor during the summer
session is head of the voice de-
partment at Augustana College
and director of the Augustana
Choir, which last Spring toured

the East coast, with concerts at
Symphony Hall in Boston, New
York's Carnegie Hall and Con.
stitution Hall in Philadelphia.
Veld is also one of the 33 mem-
bers of the American Academy of
Teachers of Singing, and Secre-
tary of the National Singing
Teachers Association. He took his
vocal and organ training in Chi-
-cago.

Topping the list of hot contro-
versies today is the question of
the bold look vs. cool comfort.
College men, faced by the heat
of summer are rebelling valiantly
against attempts to make wearing
of coats and ties to class compul-
sory. Members of the faculty re-
cently questioned on the merits of

"We don't claim good food, low prices,
instantaneous service-WE POVE IT!"

(C-

HOURS-7:00 A.M. to 1:00 A.M.
1/te I n nei' 8e11

HOT WEATHER MENACE:
Controversy Rages Over
Coat-and-tied Students

808 South State - Near Hill

WAC Chief

1

3

r4

JANET A. OSGOOD
... at Korean Embassy
* * *
'U' Grad Stays
At Seoul Post
Janet A. Osgood, '48, has decided
to remain at her post in the Amer-
ican embassy in Seoul, South Kor-
ea, despite the threat to the capi-
tal of invasion by the North
Korean Communist army.
Miss Osgood, an employe in the
embassy's communications divis.
ion, went to Korea in February,
1949. She holds a degree in politi-
cal science from the University.
Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Char-
les Osgood of Saline, learned yes-
terday of their daughter's decision
to remain in Seoul.
A telegram from her read: "Am
well and safe. Working hard and
enjoying it. Don't worry please.
Letter coming but am staying."
Pellets, Soap
End Problems
Using a handful of tiny copper
pellets and a batch of special soap
solution, a University professor
has developed two rapid, simple
and inexpensive techniques for
answering certain previously un-
solved engineering problems.
Known as the Soap-Film and
Sandbed-Mapper techniques, they
make it possible for the first time
to produce a complete "map" of
stress forces occurring inside non-
circular metal shafts, according to
Prof. A. D. Moore, of'the electrical
engineering department, who dr;-
veloped the methods.
THE TECHNIQUES can also be
employed to produce "maps" of
the streamline characteristics of
the flow of heat, electricity, and
fluids, Prof. Moore said.
Determination of the stress
forces and streamline flow pat-
terns is accomplished by photo-
graphically measuring the uni-
quely produced diagrams, Moore
explained.
Previous measuring methods in-
volved a time-consuming point-
by-point process requiring exten-
sive mathematical calculations, he
indicated, and were not applicable
to a direct study of internal stress
and flow activities.
Archeologists Will
Study Indian Sites

such an action all had definite
opinions, though these were far
from unanimous.
The junior-sized ruckus was
started by little Bryant College in
Providence, Rhode Island, which
has decreed that all its male stu-
dents must wear coats and ties to
their classes.
* * * -
"THUS," an announcement of
the college ran, "the students will
become used to acting like the
young business men they soon
hope to be."
The college permits only one
thing to rescind the rule: "ex-
ceedingly warm weather. At
such a time, the students may
wear only shirts and ties. Pro-
vided," the announcement went
on; "that the shirt is clean and
that the student is not wearing
suspenders."
But the question of the appro-
priate degree that the thermome-
ter had to reach before the wea-
ther was considered exceedingly
warm has not been decided.
Here on campus, Prof. L. Clay-
ton Hill of the business adminis-
tration school, didn't agree with
the Bryant ruling.
"It's important for a student to
cultivate good manners and good
taste. But," he emphasized, "a fel-
low "can be dressed comfortably
and -stibe a gentleman if he acts
like a, gentleman."
MILDRED VEBBER assistant
to the director of the Bureau of
Appointments and Occupational
Information, took the opposite
view. She thought it was a good
idea, "It's just like starting to
wear shoes again," she explained.
"You have to get used to them
slowly."'
"Besides," she said, "it can't do
any harm."
In fact, the rule is already un-,
officially in force in one of the
University's schools. A spokes-
man for the Law School ex-
plained in appropriate lawyer-
like language, "We don't re-
quire them, but it's expected."
"They're going to be profession-
al men," the spokesman went on,
warming to the subject, "and it is
incumbent upon them to maintain
the dignity becoming to profes-
sional men."
Grant Will Aid 'U'
Polio Research
A March of Dimes grant of $81,-
500 will permit University scien-
tists in the public health school
to continue their search for a
chemical means of controlling po-
lio.
The grant will be in addition
to $23,750 which is the second year
budget of a five-year $124,100 al-
lotment to the School of Public
Health from the National Foun-
dation for Infantile Paralysis.

Sees Draft
For Women
Says War Means
TotalMobilzin'
DETROIT-()-If war should
come again, women as well as
men will be drafted for service,
Mrs. Oveta Culp Hobby predicted
yesterday.
"War will mean total mobiliza-
tion," the director of the Woman's
Army Corps in World War II told
the American Red Cross conven-
tion.
"Every American of a reasonable
age will have an assigned job
which he or she must do."
* * *
MRS. HOBBY said she was sure
that in the event of war "Ameri-
can women will be found equal to
the severe demands."
These demands, she added,
would come both in civilian de-
fense work and in the armed
forces. The speaker pointed out
that when the WAC was first
formed, women volunteers were
used mainly for clerical work.
"But by the end of the war, the
WAC was doing 489 different jobs
-and I think the list could be
expanded," Mrs. Hobby said.
TURNING TO THE WORK of
the Red Cross, Mrs. Hobby said
the organization should humanize
its public appeal and "tell how
the Red Cross has aided an 1pdi-
vidual."
Fund appeals in general terms
mean a loss of public interest, she
warned.
Gen. George C. Marshall, Red
Cross President, told Junior Red
Cross delegates their members
have accomplished something still
beyond most adults - penetrated
the Iron Curtain through ex-
change of school art, music and
correspondence.
New Device Found
For Heart Count
Development of a method for
recording heart vibrations that
cannot be heard by the human ear
has been reported by Dr. Frank-
lin D. Johnston, heart specialist
and University professor of inter-
nal medicine.
Using special equipment, Dr.
Johnston has found inaudible low-
frequency vibrations to be the do-
minant vibrations produced by the
heart's mechanical activity.
The equipment used by Dr.
Johnston forms a record of all
heart vibrations, audible and in-
audible, simultaneously with aii
electro-cardiogram. This is the
first time that both types of re-
cords have been studied and dis-
tinguished clearly from each other,
Dr. Johnston said.

f

4

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*1

ipt Gintena efue
and
Student Religious Association

Cartoon
I Oddity .. . News

present

r .

OWN"me

the Last Days of Pompel

COOL!

Continuous from 1 P.M.
44c to 5 P.M.

Fri. and Sat., June 30, and July 1

7:30 and 9:30 P.M.

HENRY H.
STEVENS, Inc.
.STANCE
.MOvING & GTEVEN

--A A&MAA.-- A
qm__ 6d

ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
Advance Sale: Wed.-Sat., 1-6 P.M. - Union
Wed.-Fri., 1-4:30 P.M. -Administration Bldg.

General Admission .

.. 50c

i7Broadway
Flint, Michigan
Phone Flint
Collect 4-1686
For Lower Interstate Rates. We own, operate and schedule
-'our own fleet of vans for direct service without transfer.

La

11

IA NUMCEAEN

Piecing together the story of the
American Indians who lived along
the Mississippi River for perhaps
7,000 years will be undertaken this
summer by University archeolo-
gists.
Leaders of the group expect that
it will take at least five years to
find and excavate sites and col-
lect materials for the project being
supported by the Viking Fund,
Inc., of New York.
THE MICHIGAN group will
study counties in Missouri and Illi-
nois along the Mississippi from the
mouth of the Illinois River south
to the mouth of the Ohio River to
locate places where Indian villages
once stood.

MEALWTICKETS
ARE ALWAYS VALID

CLUB 211

The Board of Directors of the Michigan Union ex-
tends to the members of the Michigan League the privileges
of the Union Cafeteria during the 1950 Summer Session.
League members are requested to use the North Entrance
to the building and the North Stairway of the Cafeteria.
This change in policy has been made for the 1950
' y mIE I Wni nWnr m to ot P m WE nW P - pmYk r

Buy a ticket at any time!!!
A MEAL TICKET HOLDER DOES
NOT HAVE TO EAT CONSECU-
TIVE MEALS TO ECONOMIZE

-F. }

CONVENIENTLY AT

i"I

.11111 l ACIR RIF" 1 ll!! IFAUA.l

f1

I

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