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July 16, 1949 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-16

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'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tinum

TfIE TCHTAN TATTV AGK HRF1

.. #t./f Yi1 Z 1alYL LI

i

igers Rally in inh ning

To Shade Red Sox, 8-7

Snead Leads in Dapper*
Dan Open Golf Tourney
Slamming Sammy Shoots Second Straight
Sixty-Seven; Leads Metz by Three Strokes

.#PITTSBURGH - {A}) - Sammy
Snead shrugged off a storm and
a bad hole yesterday to shoot his
second straight 67 and take the
lead in the $16,500 Dapper Dan
Open Golf Tournament.
Snead's total of 134 for 36 holes
put him three strokes ahead of
Dick )Metz, of Virginia Beach,
Va., who also had a 67 today.
THAT 67 is five under par for
the 6,850-yard Alcoma Golf Club
course, where par is 36-36--"72.
Delayed by a driving rain-
storm, Snead needed five strokes
on the par three, 250-yard sec-
ond hole, but from there on he
played virtually perfect golf.
Playing on a course made to
order for his long-hitting game,
the White Sulphur Springs, W.
Va., clouter bounced back after
that one bad hole to reach the
-- _____ -__
kParker Makes

turn in 34, two under-par. Snead
was keeping his drives straight
on the hilly course and approach-
ing with deadly accuracy. Al-
though he missed a five-footer for
a birdie on the 17th after being
heckled by a noisy spectator,
Sammy was putting as if he never
had heard that he was supposed
to be erratic on the greens.
COMING HOME IN 33, Snead
birdied the 510-yard tenth and
the 370-yard 12th. On the home
hole he fired an iron shot within
a foot of the cup and dropped
the putt for a third birdie.
The weather didn't trouble the
leaders. Bobby Cruickshank, little
Pittsburgh veteran, had a hole in
one on the same hole where Snead
had his only trouble. Metz covered
the short back nine in 31 for his
67 after a first-round 71.
Gene Webb, of Clayton, Mo.,
also had a 67 today to enter a
three-way tie for third place at
138. Deadlocked with him were
Dapper Lloyd Mangrum of Chi-
cago, who finished in the rain for
a 71, and Otto Greiner of Balti-
more, who came in with 70.
Fred Haas, Jr., of New Orleans,
who had a 66 yesterday and Henry
Ransom of St. Andrews, Ill., who
had the same score for today's
best round, tied at 139.

Clay Courts
Tennis Finals

Whiting Out
In Front in
Golf Tourney
PORT HURON - (T) - Blond
Dick Whiting from Dearborn by
way of Notre Dame, got by two
major hurdles today in his bid
for the State Amateur-Golf Cham-
pionship.
The 26-year-old Dearborn golf-
er, medalist yesterday with a 69,
had a comparatively easy time in
his first round match as he took
John Babis of Detroit, 6 and 5.
THEN WHITING outlasted Ted
Kuzma of Jackson, 3 and 1, in his
IHerbie Flam and Fred Kov-
aleski, Hamtramck, Michigan,
defeated Tony Trabert, of Cin-
cinnati, and Andy Paton,. of
Ann. Arbor, Michigan, in the
Clay Court men's doubles quar-
ter finals 1-6, 6-8, 6-2, 8-6, 6-2.
second round match over the
Black River Country Club course
this afternoon.
Whiting was four up at the
14th hole but Kuzma came back
to win the 15th and 16th and
cut Whiting's margin to two up.
The Dearborn golfer got a par
on the 17th to wind up the
match.
Ed Ervasti, 1947 state champ,
fell by the wayside in one of the
big upsets of the day. Bob Mc-
Cormick of Plymouth was the sur-
prise winner in the first round
match.
* * *
THE TWO DUELED on fairly
even terms until the 15th when
McCormick fired an eagle three to
go one up. He followed it with a
par on the 16th to stay a hole
ahead.
Ervasti squared the match on
the 18th, but on the first over-
time hole, McCormick had a par
four which gave him his victory.
Harold Brink of Grand Rapids
took Ben Smith of DetroiV, a
former University of Michigan
golf champion, 3 and 1, in one
of the best matches of the morn-
ing round.
Brink then got by Jim Briegel of
Plymouth one up in this after-
noon's second round match.
The 37-year-old Grand Rapids
golfer who has played every stateI
amateur tournament since 1937
ranked tonight as one of the fa-
vorites in the tournament. In pre-
vious play, he went to the semi-
finals two years and to the finals+
match in two other years.+

DETROIT - (P)-Detroit's hit-
hungry Tigers burst out in a rash
of 17 safe blows yesterday to whip
Boston 8 to 7 and snap the Red
Sox' eight-game winning streak.
The Tigers had to come from
far behind to win. They got four
runs in the ninth inning to give
Paul (Dizzy) Trout his second
victory of the year against six
losses and hang a fifth straight
defeat on Boston's Jack Kramer,
who has yet to win a game.
*. * *
BOTH PITCHERS were the
third to be used by their clubs in
the free-hitting game.

.

(.

T1T If"1TT Y-t

Robinson, Campanella, Brown H omer
To Give Dodgers11-5 Win Over Reds

ANCHORS AWEIGH:
Record Field Competes
In Mackinac Race Today

IN THE SEVENTH, Detroit be- in Kramer. His hit scored Kell.
hI de-

gan to click. Three straight singles
by Paul Campbell, George Kell,
and Pat Mullin accounted for one
run in and sent Boston starter
Ellis Kinder to the showers.
Earl Johnson got the side out
with one more score and re-
tired Detroit without difficulty
in the eighth.
But in the ninth, with Detroit
trailing by three runs, he wasn't
so effective. Campbell led off with
a double. Kell singled him to third,
and he scored when Mullin
grounded out.
Vic Wertz banged out a single
that finished Johnson and broughtj

/

CHICAGO -(AP)- The expected
Pancho Gonzales-Frankie Parker
showdown for the National Clay
-Courts tennis title today was half
in the making as Parker bounced
into the finals with his hardest-
earned victory of the tournament.
Parker, five times winner of this
meet and second seeded, had to
get down to real business for a
6-3, 7-5, 6-3 semi-final round tri-
umph over Herbert Flam, former
National Junior Champion from
Beverly Hills, Calif.
THE OTHER semi-final match
-between top-seeded and defend-
ing champion Gonzales and third-
seeded Vic Seixas of Philadelphia
-will be played tomorrow. The
championship tangle will be Sun-
day.
One feminine finalist also was
determined today as top-ranked
Beverly Baker of Santa Monica,
Calif., rallied for a 6-8, 6-1, 6-2
semi-final decision over Mexi-
can Champion Mela Ramirez of
Mexico City.
Miss Baker meets the winner of
tomorrow's semi-final tussle be-
tween defending champion Magda
Rurac of Los Angeles and Rose-
mary Buck of Dallas, Tex.
Parker's experience and accur-
ate depth shots turned the tide
against the hard-battling Flam,
who won the National Junior ti-
tles in 1945 and 1946.
OTHER RESULTS:
Men's doubles-quarterfinals:
Sam Match, San p~rancisco, and
Seixas beat Don Lowenbein, San
Francisco, and Clarke Taylor,
Chapel Hill, N.C., 6-3, 6-4, 6-3.

Johnny Groth greeted Kramer
with a resounding double to left.
Aaron Robinson was given a free
pass and Johnny Lipon's fourth
straight single scored the two runs
that ended the game.
M * *
BROOKLYN-(P) - Home runs
by Tommy Brown, Roy Cam-
panella and Jackie Robinson plus
some sloppy fielding enabled the
Brooklyn Dodgers to trounce the
Cincinnati Reds, 11-5, yesterday.
The triumph was the Dodgers'
eighth straight over the Reds at
Ebbets Field this season.
* * *
BROWN POLED his first homer
of the season with Gil Hodges and
Luis Olmo on base in the second
inning to begin the rout.
The Dod1gers nicked balding
Ken Raffensberger for two more
runs in the fourth with the aid
of an error by Ted Kluszewski.
The Dodgers polished off Raf-
fensberger in the fifth, scoring
five runs although they got only
one hit-Campanella's 12th homer.
Robinson completed the Dodgers
scoring in the sixth when he lined
his ninth homer into the left field
stands.
CHICAGO-(P)-The Washing-
ton Senators blended six hits with
a walk and Luke Appling's throw-
ing error to score six runs in the
eighth inning and trim the Chi-
cago White Sox, 9-4, before 3,619
persons yesterday.
All told, the Senators collected
18 hits-their season high.
* * *
OUTFIELDER SAM MELE led
the potent Senator smacking with
four singles in driving in a third
of Washington's run total.
Bill Wight held a 4-2 lead going
into the eighth in search of his
tenth victory. Before the Senators
were finally stopped both Alex
Carrasquel and Max Surkont
rushed to Wight's rescue.
Probable Pitchers
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Pittsburgh at New York (2) -
Bonham (5-2) and Chambers
(4-1) vs. Hartung (7-8) and
Jones (6-7) or Behrman (3-2).
St. Louis at Philadelphia -
Brazle (8-4) vs. Vorowy (7-6).
Cincinnati at Brooklyn -
Wehmeier (1-5) vs. Roe (8-2).
Chicago at Boston - Rush
(7-10) vs. Sain (6-9).
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Washington at Chicago -
Scarborough (7-5) vs. Gum-
pert (7-7).
Philadelphia at Cleveland-
Brissie (9-4) vs. Wynn (6-1) or
Gromek (4-4).
New York at St. Louis--Byrne
(6-4) vs. Fannin (2-5).
Boston at Detroit -- Parnell
(11-5) vs. Kretlow (2-2) or
Trucks (10-5).

CHICAGO - (P) - A cannon
booming off Chicago's skyline will
signal the startof the world's
longest fresh water yacht race, the
42nd Chicago-to-Mackinac Island
sailing competition.
Entered in the three-day chase
the 331-mile length of Lake Mich-
igan are 64 boats sailing in five
cla;!ssees. Barring expected
scratches, this will top last year's
record entry of 61.
* * *
DEFENDING CHAMPION in the
Czech Tennis
Players Defy
Red Orders
GSTAAD, Switzerland - (A') -
Jaroslav Drobny and Vladimir
Cernik, two of the world's best
known tennis players, turned their
backs on their native Czechoslo-
vakia yesterday and prepared to
seek admission to the United
States as political refugees.
Here for the Swiss National
Championships, the two defied an
order by the Communist-domin-
ated government to return to
Prague immediately because of the
presence of two Germans and a
Spaniard in the tournament.
They said they would continue
to play here, then enlist the aid
of the U.S. Lawn Tennis Associa-
tion and friends abroad in gaining
a haven as exiles in the United
States.
(In Washington, D.C., State De-
partment officials said any request
by Drobny and Cernik to enter
the United States would be receiv-
ed "sympathetically." They point-
ed out that other foreign athletes
had been permitted to come here
after renouncing their govern-
ments.

cruising division is Taltonah, a
newly-rigged cutter, owned by Ed-
gar B. Tolman of Chicago.
In the Universal division, Chi-
cago's L. L. (Ole) Karas will try
to pilot his yawl, Cara Mia, to a
third straight victory and his
10th Mackinac win as an owner.
The first gun at noon (CST)
will sen'd the Class D cruising en-
tries sailing north, followed by the
four remaining classes every 15
minutes.
* * *
THE ENTIRE RACE, which av-
erages 55 hours, but which may
come closer to 65 hours, will be
patrolled by a full-strength Coast
Guard complement, including the
390-foot ice-breaker, Mackinaw; a
Coast Guard helicopter aboard the
big boat; the 'eutter, Frederick Lee;
and a PBY aircraft.
The Atlantic seaboard has
one of its rare entries in the
race, the Tiny Teal, a 39-footer
out of Larchiont, N.Y., yacht
club, owned by Palmer H. Lang-
don and sailing in the cruising
division.
Strong contenders in the cruis-
ing division also include three big
yawls from out-of-town ports; in-
cluding the 70-foot "Scratch" boat,
Kittyhawk, owned by W. Robert
Temken of Cleveland; Royono, the
1947 champion, owned by J. B.
Ford, Jr., Detroit; and the 72-
foot Escapade, owned by Wendell
Anderson of Detroit.
* * *
THE MASSIVE SLOOP, Sabre,
an 87-footer, owned by Roman
Brotz of Sheboygan, Wis., is the
largest racer in the fleet and was
rated scratch in the Universal di-
vision.
Last year, a 53-mile-an-hour
gale hit the fleet 24 hours out of
Chicago forcing four craft out of
competition. The Mackinaw had
to tow one rudderless racer into
port in a stormy, midnight rescue.
The weatherman promised a
more placid race this time.

Night Games

I

CLEVELAND-()-The Phila-
delphia Athletics knocked Bob
Feller out of the box last night'
and defeated the Cleveland In-
dians, 8-0, for their first victory
in seven starts.
Pitcher Dick Fowler again made
the World Champs look bad with
his so-called nothing ball. He al-
lowed seven hits and beat them
for the third time this season.
.* * *
PHILADELPHIA -(P) - ,Howie
Pollet pitched and batted the St.
Louis Cardinals to a 1-0 victory
over the Philadelphia Phillies last
night. He held the Phils to six
hits and drove in the winning run
with a single in the seventh.
BOSTON - (P) - Lefty Warren
Spahn clinched his 10th victory
with a one-on homer in the second
inning last night as the Boston
Braves defeated the Chicago Cubs,
6-1. Jeff Heath made his first out-
fielding start since fracturing his
ankle last September.
* * *
ST. LOUIS-(P)-Yankee catch-
er Yogi Berra, who in three years
as a major leaguer has never been
able to hit a home run in his
home town of St. Louis, realized
a lifetime ambition by belting two
of them in Sportsman's Park last
night and led New York to a 6-0
victory over the St. Louis Browns.

WHITE SOX
announced the
Los Angeles of
He was hitting
star team. (AP

SIGN MALONE-The Chicago White Sox have
purchase of Catcher Eddie Malone (above) from
the Pacific Coast League for an undisclosed sum.
.351 and was a unanimous choice on the loop all-
Wirephoto).

1 NNW

Major League Standings

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.
Brooklyn ........49 31 .613
St. Louis ........48 33 .593
Boston ..........44 37 .543
Philadelphia.....42 39 .519
New York ........39 38 .506
Pittsburgh .......35 43 .449
Cincinnati .......31 47 .397
Chicago .........31 51 .378

AMERICAN LEAGUE

GB
1/2
52
72
812
13
17
19

W.
New York.......52
Cleveland.......45
Philadelphia.....45
Boston..........43
Detroit.........42
Washington......34
Chicago.........34
St. Louis........24

L.
27
33
36
37
40
43
48
55

Pet.
.658
.577
.556
.538
.512
.442
.415
.304

G.B.
61,/
8
9
112
17
19 2
28

at 1:30 - 4:15 - 7:10 & 10:00
tRandolph SCOTT
Ella RAINES
IC.-
__"""""""""""

Doors Open 1:15 P.M.
TODAY ONLY!

at 3:05 - 5:50 & 8:50 P.M.

Matinee 25c

Nights 35c

IFIIS/-

Starts
SUNDAY!

LORETTA YOUNG VAN JOHNSON
"MOTHER IS A FRESHMAN"

r l
l

LOST
and
FOUND

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

COOL

- Last Times Today --
WALLACE MARJORIE
BEEtRY MAIN
-- Starts Sunday -

ART CINEMA LEAGUE
PRESENTS
JANET
FREDRIC
MA RCH
"A STAR
IS BORN"
with
ADOLPHE MENJOU
TECHNICOLO
produced by
DAVID O. SELZNICK

LOST-Brown collapsible umbrella. On
campus. Call New Dorm (2-6581).
room 6569. ) 84

WANTED
WORK-Full time, any kind. Contact
Cal Leedy at 8257. )92
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED TO CHICAGO-Week-
end of 22nd or 29th. Share driving and
expense. Box 196, Mich. Daily. )89

FOR
SALT

CUSHMAN MOTOR SCOOTER - with
automatic clutch. Darwin Rhoads,
Phone 2-8312. )90
MOTOR SCOOTER-$70-Good running
condition. 2-6500, ask for Don. )93
CANARIES, Parrakeets, Lovebirds, talk-
ing, whistling Cocketiels. Bird sup-
plies and cages. 562 S. Seventh, at
W. Madison. Phone25330. t)88
SUMMER SPECIALS. Army type foot-
lockers, $10.99 (all taxes included).
U.S. Navy T-Shirts, $.49. Suntan
pants, $2.99. Sleeping Bags, $2.95 up.
Short-sleeve Sport Shirts, $1.69. Open
'til 6:30. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington, )82

BUSINESS
SERVICES

4

WHEN YOU are in need of prompt,
expert typing call
2-3537 )91
THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
is run by students, deals almost ex-
clusively with students, and offers
student rates on TIME, LIFE, FOR-
TUNE. NEWSWEEK. COLLIER'S and
SATURDAY EVENING POST. To or-
der subscriptions, simply phone 6007,
9 to 5:30 (9 to 3 Saturday). )85
TYPEWRITING SERVICE
Student reports, theses, dissertations.
Phone 6197. )28
WE BIND THESES, term papers and
dissertations in a variety of styles and
colors. OLSEN'S BINDERY
325 E. Hoover Phone 2-7976 )1
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )

ROOMS
FOR RENT
FOREIGN STUDENTS - Rooms with
complete cooking facilities. Linens
furnished. Block from Union. Phone
2-0482'. )87
HELP WANTED
SALES TRAINEES--Engineering trained
men, about 25 years old, will be placed
on 16-month program to learn pro-
ducts. Prefer C. E., Arch. E., M.E., or
I.E. Training in Chicago and reloca-
tion to district office upon comple-
tion. Straight salary. Selling to ar-
chitects, contractors, dealers. High
selection standards. Give full details.
photo. Write, Personnel Deparmtent:;
Ceco Steel Products Corporation, 5701
W. 26th Street, Chicago 50, Illinois.
)86
- N
"A STAR IS BORN"

Come to the
ICE CREAM-CAKE -LEMONADE -BALLOONS
SQUARE DANCING - MICKEY MOUSE MOVIE
WHEN: Tonight from 7 to 12 P.M.
Drop in anytime - after the movies . . . after "The Glass
Menagerie."
WHERE: Across from Angell Hall on Betsy Barbour's lawn
-South State and Williams Streets.
WHY: A benefit carnival to help a Displaced Person from

Ending Saturday

Comae
CANOE ING
Tonight
on the Huron River
_ _ --~A_

p &
I'::

I

I

\i ~

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