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July 06, 1949 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1949-07-06

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AIIIIE, MICHIGAN 'DAILY

PAGE rIIIILE

~THE MICHIGAN ~DAILY PAGE TilhttE

IMORNING REPORT
by Merle Levin, Sports Editor
CLLGE BASEBALL COACHES are moaning "raid" in agonized
tnsonce again as word comes from Ohio State University that
the Buck's star shortstop, Bob Weygandt has signed a contract to
play with the Pittsburgh Pirates' Waterloo farm club this summer.
Ohio Coach Floyd Stahl who had a great deal of grief last
season in leading his favored Buckeyes to a first division berth
in the Western Conference race is the guy who got stung this
time and he isn't taking the matter lying down.
Stahl, ignoring the too obvious fact that Ohio's baseball title
hopes for next season slipped several pegs with Weygandt's departure,
nas cried out piously that big league signing of college players will
ruin interest in college baseball.
Maybe the Buckeye mentor has a point there but I'm inclined
to believe that he's about twenty years too late in attempting to
save the popularity of college baseball.
The college game today just hasn't got the brand of appeal
necessary to keep the average fan away from the radio account of
the doings of his favorite major league team, and it is a truly rare
college ball player who can draw an extra-large audience to a game
in which he is appearing.
LOOKING AT THE SITUATION from the ball player's viewpoint
Weygandt is 26 and seeking a career in a sport which has "youth"
as its prime requisite to success.
The average Western Conference baseball team is approxi-
mately of Class B professional caliber. A majority of college teams
are no better than a Class C or D pro outfit although there are a
few who could probably make things rough for a Class A team.
But whether a college club is of A or D professional caliber is
less important than the fact that the caliber of a +-,am's competition
rarely improves.
Thus a good college player cannot improve himself by playing
against gradually improving competition each year. He must rely
on his coach's advice for improvement and while there are some
fine college coaches around the country nobody has invented a
good substitute for actual experience yet.
If a good college player seeking a baseball career succumbs to
the lure of the majors' gold after a couple of years of playing against
a bunch of guys who are out for some good clean exercise before
settling down to an engineering job in Panama, can you blame him?
I can't but Stahl whose own job depends on keeping a firm grip
on all the good ball players he can coral does. It's all in the point
of view, I guess.
* * * *
SHORT STUFF: Northwestern claims to have the miler most likely
to press little Don Gehrmann in the mile next year . . . he's Dean
Pieper who did a sensational 4:21.6 mile in high school . . . Pieper
was ineligible last season . . . Walter Roettger, head baseball coach
at Illinois since 1935 has been appointed assistant director of athletics
at Champaign . . . 69 men have been invited to attend Illini fall
football drills including 14 seniors and 25 juniors . . . Michigan first
baseman Jack McDonald's four home runs topped the Western Con-
ference in that department . . . The Wolverines led the league in
fielding with a very good .969 percentage . . . Bill Baker led the
outfielders in fielding while Tubby Raymond did same in the catching
department to help boost the Wolverine average.
Read and Use Daily Classified Ads

ardinals

Win, Gain Game on Dodgers

I-M Softball
WEDNESDAY
Phi Kappa Tau vs. Gamma
Delta.
Theta Chi vs. Alpha Chi Sigma.
Strauss vs. Theta Delta Chi.
Theta Xi vs. Omega Chi Alpha.
Sigma Chi vs. Phi Gamma
Delta.
Hayden vs. Green.
THURSDAY
Chemistry vs. Eon.
Young Progressives vs. Ro-
mance Language.
Fletcher vs. Lawyers.
Dodgers vs. Michigan Co-op.
Veterans vs. Hard-rocks.
Derelihts vs. Sportsmen.
Prescott vs. Tyler.
Hinsdale vs. Cooley.
Charles Plans'
Title Defense
For August
NEW YORK - (A') - Ezzard
Charles, newly crowned NBA
heavyweight champion, yesterday
signed to defend his title against
Gus Lesnevich, former world light
heavyweight champion, in a 15-
round match at Yankee Stadium,
Nednesday, Aug.,10. Harry Mark-
son of Madison Square Garden
announced the match for the In-
ternational Boxing Club.
Charles won the NBA crown less
than two weeks ago when he out-
pointed Jersey Joe Walcott in a
15-round bout in Chicago, June 22.
* * . *
THE NEW YORK State Athletic
Commission did not recognize
Charles as champion. Eddie Eagan,
chairman of the commission, is on
record as saying he preferred a
"tournament" to decide the suc-
cessor to the retired Joe Louis.
Fagen was not at the commis-
sion office or his law offices today
and could not be reached imme-
diately for comment as to whether
he would recognize the Charles-
Lesnevich tilt as a championship
fight.
. The summer I-M Golf tour-
ney-qualifying rounds to be
played by July 10. Entries are
now being aucepted at the golf
course. Qualifying scores should
be turned in at the club house.
-Burt Katzenmyer.

AL Batting Leaders Slump;
Kell Keeps Edge Over Field

Tribe Drops Tigers To Sweep Series
Dom DiMlaggioLeads Boston to Win

CHICAGO-(IP)-Third baseman
George Kell of the Detroit Tigers
yesterday led the American League
batting race by 18 percentage
points with a .348 mark.
Kell, who returned to action last
weekend after an injury-caused
layoff, slipped five points from his
previous week's listing, but run-
ner-up Dom DiMaggio of the Bos-
ton Red Sox slumped nine points
to .330.
IN THIRD SPOT with an un-
changed .319 was Boston's Ted
Williams. He was followed by De-
troit's Vic Wertz with .311, a drop
of six points, and Bob Dillingera
of St. Louis, who also got off the
crippled list last weekend, with
.310.
Other leaders, according to
official figures compiled through
Fourth of July gAmes, included:
Cleveland's Dale Mitchell, .309;
Gerry Priddy of St. Louis, .306;
Eddy Joost of Philadelphia, .304;
Hank Majeski, Philadelphia,
.302; and Vern Stephens, Bos-
ton, .301.
Jackie Robinson of Brooklyn,
with a 24-point lead near the
halfway mark, is going to be tough
to beat for the National League
batting crown.
* * *
WITH STAN MUSIAL, St. Louis'
defending champion, not even
listed in the top 10 hitters, Rob-
inson's .362 average overshadows
the rest of the field.
Runnerup in averages includ-
ing Sunday's games is Red
Schoendienst of St. Louis at
.338, followed closely by Pitts-
burgh's Ralph Kiner at .336.
Despite Robinson's wide lead,
the big man of the week was Wil-
lard Marshall of New York who
advanced from tenth to fourth
with 12 hits in 21 trips. This .571
Yesterdays I-M
Softball Scores,
Lawyers 8, Romance Language
2.
Fletcher 14, Econ. bept. 2.
Greene 6, Hinsdale 5.
Chem. 12, Young Progressives 1.
Derelicts 5, Dodgers 2.
FORFEITS
Hardrocks 1, Sportsmen 0.
Cooley 1, Tyler 0.
No Namere 1, Mich. Co-op 0.

clip for a week boosted his aver-
age from .305 to .330.
Bobby Thomson of New York is
fifth at .321. Then come Gil Hod-
ges of Brooklyn, .318, Enos Slaugh-
ter of St. Louis, .313, Pee Wee
Reese of Brooklyn, .321, Wally
Westlake of Pittsburgh, .310 and
Sid Gordon of New York, .309.
Westlake is the only newcomer in
the top 10, replacing Eddie Kazak
of St. Louis.

CHICAGO-(A')-The St. Louis
Cardinals captured the rubber tilt
of their three-game series with
the Chicago Cubs here yesterday
when they won a 10-inning bat-
tle, 2 to 1, before a ladies day
crowd of 26,802.
Al Schoendienst singled with
one out in the tenth, took third
on another single by Marty Mar-
ion, and tallied;while Stan Musial
forced Marion. But Musial still

had to make a great play to pre-
serve the victory. Roy Smalley
singled in the Cub half, Mickey
Owen sacrificed and Bob Ramaz-
zotti lined a pinch single to right
that sent Smalley galloping home.
However, Musial's perfect throw
nailed him on a close play.
* * * '
ST. LOUIS -(A'P) - A single by
Paul Lehner in the seventh inning
with the bases loaded resulted in
four runs when catcher Joe Tip-
ton missed the throw from the
outfield and then threw wild-and
the St. Louis Browns went on to
take a 9Wto5 victory from the
Chicago White Sox last night.
DETROIT-(AP)-The onrushing
Cleveland Indians mauled three
Detroit Tiger pitchers for 14 hits
and an 8 to 1 decision last night
to sweep their three-game series.
Left hander Frank Papish scat-
tered seven Detroit hits for his
first victory of the season.
THE THIRD PLACE Indians
picked up a full game on the New
York Yankees whose American
League lead was cut to four games
as they lost to Boston tonight.
Second-place Philadelphia was
idle.
It was Papish's second start of
the season and the Indians got
him off to a flying start as they
climbed all over Tiger starting
pitcher Mary Grissom for three
runs and four hits in the open-
ing inhing.
They drove Grissom to the
showers in the second stanza as
they pushed over another run on a
walk and two singles before Mar-

lin Stuart came in and got the
side out.
* * *
NEW YORK-W)-Dom Dimag-
gio stole a page from his older
brother Joe's book last night,
slamming a home run and triple,
and making a spectacular catch of
Phil Rizzuto's extra-base bid, to
lead the Boston Red Sox to a 4-2
victory over the New York Yan-
kees. A crowd of 60,252 saw 20-
year-old Maurice McDermott hold
the Yankees to four hits as the
Sox broke an eight-game losing
streak.
The Yankee lead over the idle
second place Philadelphia Ath-
letics was cut to four games.
Tommy O'Brien's firsthhome
run broke a 2-2 tie in the sev-
enth, while Dom DiMaggio's ho-
mer clinched it in the eighth.
The Sox pounded Ed Lopat
and Frank Shea for 14 hits and
left 14 men stranded on the
bases.
BROOKLYN -(A-- The Phila-
delphia Phils rushed Lefty Joe
Hatten to the showers with a six-
run barrage in the first inning last
night and went on to defeat the
Brooklyn Dodgers, 7-2, to take un-
disputed possession of third place
in the National League. Lefty Ken
Heintzelman spaced seven hits to
register his 10th victory of the
season, his fourth against the
Brooks.
The loss cut Brooklyn's lead
over the St. Louis Cardinals to
one game.

SUSTERKA LAKE
SWIMMING - FREE DANCING
Picnic Grounds --- Refreshments
Parties Accommodated
CALL DON BASTEDO - YPSI 1038-W2

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+ Classified Advertising

+

LANIER MAKES FIRST PITCHING START AFTER BAN IS
LIFTED--Max Lanier, St. Louis Cardinals pitcher who jumped to
the Mexican League in 1946, strides from the dugout at Wrigley
Field, Chicago, to pitch his first game in the National League since
his return when the ban was lifted. Lanier's first appearance
was- not very effective as the Chicago Cubs routed him in the third
inning.
Major League Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB W. L. Pct. G.B.
Brooklyn ......44 29 .603 ... New York .......48 26 .649 .
St. Louis ......43 30 .589 1 Philadelphia .....44 30 .595 4
Philadelphia .. .41 35 .539 412 Cleveland .......41 31 .569 6
Boston ........40 35 .533 5 Detroit.........39 36 .520 9'2
New York ......36 36 .500 712 Boston ..........36 36 .500 11
Pittsburgh .....31 40 .437 12 Washington ......32 39 .451 14%/
Cincinnati .....29 41 .414 1312 Chicago .........30 45 .400 182
Chicago .......28 46 .378 162 St. Louis .........23 50 .315 241/2
[DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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NEW HORSES
Instructions Available
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Golfside Stables
GENE BLAND, Mgr.
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OPEN TO THE PUBLIC-
TEMPLE CAFETERIA

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ROOM AND BOARD.
TASTY HOME-COOKED MEALS-Sani-
tary approved AA Health Dept. Mrs.
Peachers, 1009 E. Catherine St. Call
2-3782. 2 meals daily 12:15 p.m., 6:15
p.m. Sunday 1:00 p.m. )37
HELP WANTED
MALE or FEMALE-College Grad or
some college training. Retail sales
and office work. Guaranteed salary
plus commissions. Permanent posi-
tion wit hfuture. 1319 So. Univ., Ph.
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FOR
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MOTOR SCOOTER--$75-Custom built.
good running condition. Phone 2-
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GIRL'S blue Schwinn built thin tired
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1941 FORD SEDAN-New motor, radio,
heater. Highest bidder. Evenings 1683
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BIOLOGY TEACHERS! The micro-
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mech. stage. New. Lowest price. 2-
4271..) 47
BINOCULAR MICROSCOPE -German,
new, modern design. Full optical
equipment. Call 2-2521, Ext. 415 'til
5 p.m. After 6 2-8551. )38

JJANQ
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ROOMS FOR RENT
STUDENT in public health has large
room to share-cooking, laundry and
entertaining privileges. Ph. 2-2826.
)52

Now Under
NE W MANAGEMENT
Serving
SUNDAY DINNERS
11:30 A.M. to 3:30 P.M. (Reg. Weekday Prices)
WEEKDAYS (MON. thru FRI.)
11 to 2, 5 to 7:30 P.M. Closed Sat. All Day

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We have just the SINGLE ROOM for
You-Cool, 1 block south campus,
economical too! Phone 2-7133, or
1021 Hill St. )54
DOUBLE & SINGLE ROOMS-Married
couple or working man, close to cam-
pus and Union, reasonable rent,
shower, continuous hot water. Call
509 S. Division St., near Jefferson. )45
BUSINESS
SERVICES
WE BIND THESES, term papers and
dissertations in a variety of styles and
colors.
OLSEN'S BINDERY
325 E. Hoover Phone 2-7976 )1
TYPEWRITING SERVICE-Student re-
ports, theses, dissertations. Phone
6197. ) 28
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2
RESTRICTED TO ENROLLED students:
a special Student Rate on TIME-
only $5.00 yr. instead of $6.50. Only
9.6c a copy instead of 20c. Subscribe
now through TIME's student repre-
sentative. DonrAnderson, 50Grad.
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golfing..
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NOW 10.95
These are all our regular top grades
and include scattering sizes in Men's
"Tl ~s -F 1 T/ ITrT f h s Tr~ F9T h T T TT 1 U' yr

(Continued from Page 2)
of the Bureau of Psychological
Services. 3:00 p.m., Auditorium,
University High School.
Luncheon Conference. "Turkey"
in New Mexican Spanish. Law-
rence B. Kiddle, Associate Profes-
sor of Spanish. Luncheon, 12:10
p.m., Anderson Room, Michigan
Union; lecture, 1:00 p.m., Rm. 3D.
Speech Assembly: "The New
Look in Radio and Television."
Giraud Chester, Naitional Broad-
casting Company. 3:00 p.m. Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for
Kuang-ya Chu, Physics; thesis: "A
Study on the Decay Schemes of
AU198 and HF 181 by means of
a Beta-Ray Spectrometer and Co-
incidence Measurements," Wed-
nesday, July 6, East Alcove, As-
sembly Hall, Rackham Bldg., at
3:00 p.m. Chairman, M. L. Weid-
enbeck.

July 7 in the Rackham Assembly
Hall, in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the Master of
Music degree. His program will in-
clude compositions by Galliard,
(Continued on Page 4)
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TO DINE

OVER 200 MEMBERS
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WHY SLAVE
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Wash, rinse and damp-dry
clothes automatically in Wes-
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Dryers available
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Student Recital: Albert Buswell,
graduate student of tuba with
HaroldFerguson, will present a
program at 8 p.m., Wednesday,
"KEEP A-HEAD
OF YOUR HAIR"!!
Plenty of Barbers-Fan Cooled
Tonsorial Queries invited!
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State

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