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June 26, 1949 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-06-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY 'E S

)odgers Outslug Pirates, 17-10;

Tigers Stop

Yanks

.,

4,

* * * *

AP Flashes
ST. LOUIS-The Boston Braves
cut loose with an 18-hit attack
tonight to cool off the redhot St.
Louis Cardinals, 10 to 6. Johnny
Sain posted his first victory in
over a month but had to have re-
lief from Nelson Potter in the
ninth. The defeat knocked the
Cards out of first place which they
took over only last night.
AUSTIN, Tex.-Jack Tuero ok
Tulane won the National Colle-
giate Singles Tennis championship
yesterday. He beat Sam Match of
San Francisco in the finals, 2-6,
0-6, 6-4, 9-7, 6-0.
POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y.-The
smooth-stroking University of
California crew won the varsity
event in the Poughkeepsie Re-
gatta yesterday after coming
from behind in the last mile.
* * *
LONDON - Richard (Pancho)
Gonzales, 21-year-old U.S. singles
titleholder, was spilled out of the
Wimbledon tennis championships
today in a sensational upset by the
two-handed shots of Australia's
Geoff Brown.
All other seeded stars gained the
men's singles quarter-finals with
straight-set triumphs, including
top-seeded Ted Schroeder of La
Crescenta, Calif., defending cham-
pion Bob Falkenberg of Beverly
-allil ''gn .zauzoi pug "J11,60 's11H
holder Frank Parker of Los An-
geles.

Hermanski Collects Five
Hits for Burs;_Phils Win

Prince Hal Has 6-Hitter;
Bosox Still on Hit Spree

PITTSBURGH - The Brooklyn
Dodgers smashed the Pittsburgh
Pirates 17-10 yesterday, with Gil
Hodges spearheading the assault
by clouting two homers, a triple,
double and single.
Hodges drove home four runs
and scored four in the slugging
duel that was featured by four
Brooklyn home runs and five
Pittsburgh four-baggers.
Jackie Robinson and Carl Fu-
rillo smacked the other Brooklyn
homers while Ralph Kiner belted
two and Dino Restelli, Wally
Westlake and Ed Stevens one each
for the Pirates. Kiner's blows were
his 17th and 18th of the season.
The nine homers fell one short
of tying the major league rec-
ord for most home runs in a
game ~by both clubs. The mark
was set Aug. 16, 1947 when the
Pirates banged seven and the St.
Louis Cardinals three at Forbes
Field.
Bob Chesnes started for Pitts-
burgh and walked home two runs
in the first inning. The Pirates
bounced back with five in their
half, three on Wally Westlake's
12th homer of the season.
Ralph Branca, making his first
start in ten days, went all the
way for Brooklyn to post his ninth

triumph against one loss. Branca
was belted for 12 hits.
* * *
CINCINNATI - Young Robin
Roberts saved the day for veteran
Ken Heintzelman yesterday as he
choked off a ninth inning Cin-
cinnati rally to give the Phila-
delphia Phillies a 6-5 victory over
the Redlegs.
Heintzelman, notching his
eighth victory as against three
defeats, handcuffed the Reds on
five hits until the ninth. After
one out, he served up two-
baggers to Red Stallcup and
Jimmy Bloodworth and then
Danny Litwhiler clubbed a long
homer to bring the Reds within
one run of tying the score.
Roberts took over. He made Ted
Kluszewski ground out and then
fanned pinch batter Johnny Wy-
rostek.
The Phillies, winning their
ninth of 12 games on -the current
road trip, knocked starter Howard
Fox from the mound with a three-
run outburst in the sixth.
.* * *
CHICAGO-The tail-end Chi-
cago Cubs handed the once high
4nd mighty New York Giants their
13th loss in their last 17 games
yesterday as Bob Rush pitched a
neat 4-1, six hit triumph.
Frankie Baumholtz' wild
throw in the second inning on
Buddy Kerr's single allowed Sid
Gordon to score with New York's
lone run.
Catcher Ralph Novotney drove
home three of Chicago's runs with
a fly ball and single.-
Hank Sauer opened the Chi-
cago scoring in the second in-
ning with his ninth home run
of the season.
Giant Manager Leo Durocher
was ejected from the game for the
.econd time in five days in the
fourth for arguing too strenuously
with umpire Lee Ballanf ant over
the decision at second.

YER OUT BUB-Buddy Kerr, New York Giants' shortstop seems
to be giving Hal Jeffcoat of Chicago the out sign as he whips the
ball to first base to complete a double play in Friday night's
contest at Wrigley Field. The twin-killing wasn't enough to stop
the Cubs however. They whipped the Giants, 6-2.
Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!
TEMPLEC AI

New York .... .
Philadelphia ..
Detroit .......
Boston .......
Cleveland .....
Washington ..
Chicago......
St. Louis ... .

w
40
36
35
34
32
30
26
18

L
23
28
28
28
28
32
39
45

Pet.
.635
.563
.556
.548
.533
.484
.400
.286

GB
4V2
5
51/
61
91/2
15
22

W.
Brooklyn ......38
St. Louis ......37
Philadelphia .. .37
Boston ........36
New York .....30
Cincinnati .....25
Pittsburgh .....25
Chicago .......24

L. Pct.
25 .603
25 .597
28 .569
29 .554
32 .484
36 .410
38..397
39 .381

G.B.
2
3
7 /
12
13
14

MASONIC TEMPLE

1 327 S. Fourth Ave.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 9, New York 3
Washington 3, Cleveland 2
Boston 13, St. Louis 2
Philadelphia 7, Chicago 6
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at New York (2)
Cleveland at Washington
Chicago at Philadelphia (2)
St. Louis at Boston -

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Brooklyn 17, Pittsburgh 10
Philadelphia 6, Cincinnati 5
Chicago 4, New York 1
Boston 10, St. Louis 6.
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Pittsburgh (2)
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (2)
New York at Chicago
Boston at St. Louis

By The Associated Press
.NEW YORK-Hal Newhouse r
had little trouble in pitching the
Detroit Tigers to a 9-3, six-hit
triumph over the American
League's front-running New York
Yankees yesterday.
The classy Tiger lefthander
gave up eight walks, three each
in the fourth and ninth innings
which the Yanks turned into
runs.
Hank Bauer singled behind three
bases on balls in the second to
drive in two runs. Gerry Coleman
drove home the Yanks' final run
in the ninth when he bounced into
a force out after Newhouser had
walked three batters.
The Tigers gave their crack
lefty an early working margin,
plastering Fred Sanford for four
runs in the first inning.
Eddie Lake walked to start the
game and raced to third on Vic
Wertz' single. Hoot Evers singled
Lake across. Sanford then passed
Aaron Robinson to load the bases.
Johnny Groth grounded out,
Wertz scoring on the play, and
Don Kolloway followed with a two
run single.
Sanford walked Lake to start
the second inning. The stocky
infielder moved to second on a
ground out and scored on a
single by Vic Wertz. Frank Shea
relieved Sanford after Wertz'
hit and blanked the Tigers until
he was removed for a pinch-
hitter in the fourth.
Clarence Marshall took over and
yielded a run in the sixth when
Paul Campbell singled with the
bases loaded. Marshall was clipped
for three more runs in the eighth
with Evers knocking home two
with a double.
PHILADELPHIA-The Philadel-
phia Athletics fought an uphill
battle yesterday to defeat the Chi-
cago, White Sox, 7-6. The win left
the A's four and a half games be-
hind the front-running New York
Yankees who lost to Detroit.
Two hits, three walks, a sacri-
fice and two errors got the Sox
off to a five-run start against
Dick Fowler in the first inning.
But after that the big Canadian
turned on the heat while his
teammates pecked away at
Howie Judson, chasing him in
the sixth inning. It was Fowler's
sixth straight victory.
The Athletics put together three
hits for their first run in the first
inning, scoring two more in the
third on an error, a walk and
single by Sam Chapman, and tied
the score at five-all in the sixth
on two hits, a walk and a pair of
Chicago boots.
The Sox grabbed the lead in
the eighth on two hits and. a
walk. Then the A's retaliated.
Hank Majeski started the
winning rally with a double. He
scored on Elmer Valo's two-bagger
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and after Philadelphia filled the
bases Eddie Joost lifted an out-
field fly that permitted Valo to
trot home with the winning run.
* * *
BOSTON - With the Red Sox
teammates blasting 17 hits, Mel
Parnell, the southpaw ace, coasted
to his 10th win of the season with
a 13-2 decision yesterday over the
hapless St. Louis Browns who suf-
fered their third consecutive Fen-
way Park setback.
The Red Sox chased starter
lefty Bill Kennedy, their former
farm hand, by pounding him for
seven runs in the third inning.
That uprising resulted in seven
hits, including doubles by Bobby
Doerr and Al Zarilla, five singles,
a walk, an error and a struck
batter.
Zarilla drove his sixth homer
into the right field bull pen with
Billy Goodman on base in the
sixth inning.
WASHINGTON-Gil Coan hit a
home run with two out and one on
in the ninth inning yesterday to
give the Washington Senators a
4-2 victory over the Cleveland In-
dians before a ,crowd of 9,695.
Coan's third homer of the
year, it was only inches inside
the foul line.
It presented Ray Scarborough,
who pitched only one inning, his
seventh victory. Bob Lemon, who
had replaced Frank Papish in the
eighth, was Coan's victim and was
charged with his third defeat.
The Senators punched over the
tying run in the eighth on Clyde
Vollmer's single and Eddie Rob-
inson's triple just before a down-
pour interrupted the game 40 min-
utes.

oil all

[i

Gordon Falls,
Michaels U
In Honor Poll
CHICAGO.-(AP)-Cass Michaels
of the Chicago White Sox forged
ahead yesterday in the All-Star
baseball, poll to take the lead as
the American League's top second
baseman. ,
Thousands of votes from Chi-
cago fansnand those of 6ther re-
gions enabled Michaels to regain
the lead for second base from
Cleveland's Joe Gordon. Michael's
vote yesterday totaled 528,943 to
521,802 for Gordon.
The poll opened on June 10 and
will close at midnight next Wed-
nesday. Thus far more than 2,000-
000 ballots have been cast.
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS:
National League: lb - Mize,
New York; 2b-J. Robinson,
Brooklyn; 3b-Kazak, SA Louis;
ss-Reese, Brooklyn; c--Semi-
nick, Philadelphia; of -Kiner,
Pittsburgh; Musial, St. Louis;
Marshall, New York.
American League: lb-E. Rob-
inson, Washington; 2b-Michaels,
Chicago; 3b--Kell, Detroit; ss-
Joost, Philadelphia; c-Tebbetts,
Boston; of-Williams, Boston, Di-
Maggio, Boston; Henrich, New
York.

K '
t

Now Under
NEW MANAGEMENT
Serving
SUNDAY DINNERS

BOOK

DAILY

11 :30 A.M. to 3:30 P.M.

(Reg. Weekday Prices)

OFFICIAL
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WE EKDAYS (MON. thru FRI.)
11 to 2, 5 to 7:30 P.M. Closed Sat. All Day

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Hll

Student

Directory

(Continued from Page 2)
of all members, both graduate and
undergraduate, of the Omega Psi
Phi Fraternity on Tuesday, June
28, 1949, at 7:00 p.m. at the Mich-
igan Union for the purpose of or-
ganization during the summer
session.
Museum of Art: Michigan Water
Color Society, 3rd Annual; Isla-
mic Pottery; Alumni Memorial
Hall, daily 9-5, Sundays 2-5. The
public is invited.
Graduate students may not elect
courses after this week. Courses
may be dropped with record after
this week, but will be recorded
with the grade of E if dropped
after the fourth week of classes.
Natural Resource Lecture: Stu-
dents enrolled in Forestry 194f and
City Planning 200s are required
to attend this lecture. Other stu-
dents and the general public are
invited.
The Inter - American Schools
Service of Washington, D.C., an-
nounces vacancies on the elemen-
tary and secondary levels, in vari-
ous schools in South America. A
degree is necessary, also a mini-
mum of one year of teaching ex-
perience. For further information,
call at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments.
The Board of National Missions
of the Presbyterian Church in the
U.S.A. announces vacancies in its
missionary schools for teachers of
,i

the following subjects: Arts and
Crafts; Coach; Elementary grades;
English; Industrial subjects;
Mathematics; Music. There are
also positions open for dietitians;
agriculturalists; m a i!n t e n an c e
workers; secretaries; and house-
mothers. For further information
call at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments.
Music School Students expect-
ing to present a recital during the
summer session must appear be-
fore a special full-faculty jury be-
ginning at 4 p.m., Monday, June
27, in Room 305 S.M., if they have
not previously been approved.
Lectures
Monday, June 27
Lecture. "General Education at
the Secondary Level." Raleigh
Schorling, Professor of Education,
Director of Instruction in the Uni-
versity High School, and Super-
visor of Directed Teaching. 3:00
p.m., Auditorium, University High
School.
Lecture. "The Enzymatic Oxi-
dation of Fatty Acids. Lecture I."
Dr. Albert L. Lehninger, Assistant
Professor of Biochemistry and
Surgery, University of Chicago.
4:15 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
Summer Session Lecture Series.
Natural Resources in World Af-
fairs. "Under All, the Land." Wil-
liam A. Rosecrans, Vice-President
of the Chamber of Commerce of,
the United States. 8:00 p.m., Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.

Vocational Education." Walter H.
Cooper, Vocational Staff, United
States Office of Education. 3:00
p.m., Auditorium, University High
School.
Lecture. "The Enzymatic Oxi-
dation of Fatty Acids. Lecture II."
Dr. Albert L. Lehninger, University
of Chicago. 4:15 p.m., Rackham
Amphitheater.
Lecture. "The Fall of the Ro-
man Empire: a Reconsideration of
its Causes." A. E. R. Boak, Rich-
ard Hudson Professor of Ancient
History. 4:15 p.m. Kellogg Audi-
torium.
Lecture. "Analogy." Professor
W. Freeman Twaddell, Brown Uni-
versity. 7:30 p.m., Rackham Am-
phitheater.
India Colloquiem. "Tatanagar
and Batanagar in the Social Econ-
omy of India." Proftssor Benoy
Sarkar, University of Calcutta.
4:15 p.m., West Conference Room,
Rackham Building.
Concerts
Student Recital: Patricia Hough,
graduate student of piano with
Joseph Brinkman, will present a
program at 8:00 p.m., Monday,
June 27, in the Rackham Assem-
bly Hall, in partial fulfillment of
the requirements for the Master
of Music degree. Her program will
include compositions by Bach,
Franck, Debussy, and Hindemith,
and will be open to the general
public.
Chamber Music Recital, auspi-
ces of the School of Music. Stan-
(Continued on Page 4)

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Lecture. "New Developments

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