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June 26, 1949 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIHE MICHIGAN fDAILY

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YOUNG MUSICIANS MEET:
Interlochen Music Camp
Begins Operations Today

Campus
Calendar

By JOHN NUEFELD
Today the 1949 Season of the
National Music Camp gets its of-
flcial start.
Founded in 1928, the Interloch-
en camp has been internationally
famous for its musical activities
which give young students a
chance to hear and perform great
compositions while enjoying the
healthy outdoor life of Northern
UWF To Ask
State Support
On Union Plan
United World Federalists in
Michigan, augmented by a group
of war veterans, have launched a
camp3aign which they hope will
bring about a government-sup-
ported constitution for a world
Uniop.
The first step in their attack
will be to call the plan to the
attention of the Legislature
through referendum petitions'.
AFTER THE Legislature had
acted on the petitions, UWF hopes
veterans in other states take up
the cause and attempt to influence
their respective legislatures in
supporting a proposal for world
government.
Then, the states would be
asked to submit the plan to
Congress; asking Washington to
call an international convention
for the purpose of formulating a
world constitution.
If enough states approve of this
world constitution, it would be-
come, after due process, an amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution.
(World Federalists are those
who believe that a permanent
peace can only be achieved by a
world government exercising pow-
er over men and states and ren-
dering justice through world
courts.)

Michigan. (Interlochen is 12 miles
from Traverse City).
* * *
HIGH SCHOOL and college
musicians come from all over the
world to spend a couple of weeks
or more of well-rounded work in-
volving orchestras, bands, choral
groups, operatic groups and all
types of smaller ensembles.
Last year there were 202
Michigan students, many more
from almost every state of the
Union, Puerto Rico, and citi-
zens of China, Ecuador and Nor-
way.
The NMC was originally estab-
lished as the summer home of the
National High School Orchestra,
but has since added the University
Division and the Intermediate and
Junior Divisions.
THE CAMP HAS also added
dance, speech and art depart-
inents to the original music de-
partment.
Dancing instruction covers
such varied fields as modern
dance, figure skating, ballet
training and acrobatic dancing.
Speech and graphic art also of-
fer varied programs. Campers
often find time to engage in the
many recreational activities.
In the University Department,
summer session credit is offered
in the music school, the speech
department, the physical educa-
tion department and the archi-
tecture college. Courses will last
until Aug. 22.
The National Music Camp is
affiliated with the University. The
Ca mp's president, Joseph E. Mad-
dy, is music professor at the Uni-
versity.
Pi Tau i Sigma
Pi Tau Pi Sigma, national hon-
orary fraternity of the Signal
Corps, has elected its officers for
next year.
They are: Rudolf Rust, '51,
president; Ed Green, '51E, vice-
president; Arthur Knapp, '50E,
secretary; and Ira Bissey, '51E,
treasurer.

SURVIVORS WATCH SHIP SINK -Passengers and crewmen who were just rescued from the
Princess Astrid watch as she settles into the sea off the French Coast. The ship struck a wartime
mine that had been floating in the English Channel. The accident occured while the ship was
making one of its regular channel runs from Ostend to Dover June 22.
'U'Students To Give K

EVENTS TODAY
Carillion Recital - Professor'
Perceval Price,N University Caril-
lonneur. 2:15 to 3 p.m.
MONDAY
Lecture-"General Education at
the Secondary Level." Raleigh
Schorling, Professor of Education.
3 p.m., University High School
Auditorium.
Lecture--"The Enzymatic Oxi-
dation of Fatty Acids. Lecture 1."
Dr. Albert L. Lehninger of Uni-
versity of Chicago. 4:15 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheater.
Summer Session Lecture Series
-Natural Resources in World Af-
fairs. "Under All, the Land." Wil-
liam A. Rosecrans, vice-president
U.S. Chamber of Commerce. 8
p.m., Rackham Lecture Hall.
School of Music-Student Re-
cital. Patricia Hough, pianist. 8
p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
TUESDAY
Education Lecture - "New De-
velopments in Vocational Educa-
tion. Walter H. Cooper, U.S. Of-
fice of Education. 3 p.m., Univer-
sity High School Auditorium.
Lecture-"The Enzymatic Oxi-
dation of Fatty Acids. Lecture 2."
Dr. Albert L. Lehninger, Univer-
sit yof Chicago. 4:15 p.m., Rack-
ham Amphitheater.
Lecture-"The Fall of the Ro-
man Empire: a Reconstruction of
its Causes." A. E. R. Boak, Rich-
ard Hudson Professor of Ancient
History. 4:15 p.m., Kellogg Audi-
torium.
Lecture - "Analogy." Prof. W.
Freeman Twaddell, Brown Uni-
versity. 7:30 p.m. Rackham Ampi-
theater.
School of Music-Chamber Mu-
sic Recital. Stanley Quartet. 8 p.
m., Rackham Lecture Hall.
India Colloquium - "Tatanagar
and Batanagar in the Social Econ-
omy of India." Prof. Benoy Sar-
kar, University of Calcutta. 4:15
p.m., West Conference Room,
Rackham Building.

New Stanley Strin Quartet
Will Make Debut Tuesday
Q____Th newly-established Stanley in G major, Op. 76, No. 1: Ross
Quartet. stiing quartet - in- resi- Lee Finney's Qiurtet in E minor,
denc at the University will pe- No. 5; and Faure's Quartet in C
sent its first program at 8 p.m.mno,nFp.Q15.
Tuesday. Rackham Lecture Hall. mior, Op. 15.
The .program will consist of
three quartets: Haydn's Quartet chamber musiT efORt an eay
French composer written in 1879,
Loc>lite To Teach calls for a piano instead of the
*.secondviolin which is part of the
isso s Coirse string quartet ensemble.
IIelen Titus, professor in the
Maxine J. Westphal, women's music school, will play the piano
counselor of the Episcopal Student part. The regular members of
Foundation, will leave today for the quartet, all of them on the
Cranbrook School, where she will music school faculty, are Gilbert
conduct a course for the Summer Ross and Emil Raab, violins,
Youth Conference of the Episco- Paul Doktor, viola, and Oliver
pal Diocese of Michigan. Edel, 'cello.
Her course is entitled, "Know Ross Lee Finney wrote his new
Your Missions." The only person quartet in Nov. 1948. He is pro-
invited from Ann Arbor to lec- fessor of composition at the Uni-
ture at the conference, Miss West- versity.
phal was formerly the headmis- Altogether, three chamber mu-
tress of a mission school in the sic evenings and two recitals by
Philippines. Willard MacGregor, pianist, will
The conference begins today and be presented in the summer ses-
will last until July 1. During this sion series of faculty concerts.
time, the entire Cranbrook School All concerts are open to the
is put at its disposal. public without charge.

4

I

/ \

The department of speech will
present a children's narration over
station WPAG-FM at 6:45 this
afternoon, starring Lucille Wal-
dorf and Don Hall.
Directed by Richard Jennings,
the script, "Why Animals Can't
Talk, was written by Lee Wilson.

e
i 1 _.

Garnet R. Garrison is in charge "The Little Tailor," and will be
of production. broadcast at 5:3Q over WUOM.
* * * Announcer on the show will be
JENNINGS WILL also diret the Leo Johnson. Lucille Waldorf will
Tuesday Drama in the regular handle sound and Don Hall the
children's feature program series, music. The cast includes Stanley
"Tales from the Four Winds." Kinney, Pres Holmes, Ed Gleich,
This week's story is a radio Virginia Doherty, Donna DeHarde,
adaptation by Ray Hamby of Ruth Mohr and Nancy Cupples.

[DAILY OFICIAL BULLETIN,

All notices for the Daily Official
Bulletin are to be sent to the Office
of the Summer Session in typewritten,
form by 3:30 p.m. of the day preced-
ing its publication, except on Satur-
day when the notices should be sub-
mitted by 11:30 a.m., Room 3510 Ad-
ministration Building.
SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 1949
VOL. LIX, No. 5S
Student drivers are reminded
that their driving tags or "M" I
stickers secured in the Office- of
Student Affairs are NOT PARK-
ING PERMITS and do not give
them permission to park in the
restricted campus parking lots.
These restricted areas, so desig-
nated by means of signs at the
entrance to the lots, are reserved
for faculty and staff personnel

Come
CANOEING
Tonight
on the Huron River

:

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of the rank of instructor or above
and disabled students, who have
received parking permits from
the office of the Secretary of the
University. Persons parking in
these lots illegally or improperly
are notified by means of a card
which is placed on the windshield.
Beginning June 29, fines will be
imposed for using these restricted
areas without proper permission.
First offenses will bring a fine of
$1.00, second offenses $2.00 and
third offenses $3.00 along with
possible loss of driving privileges.
Students may park in the fol-
lowing areas at any time as long
as their cars are parked properly
and do not block any entrance or
the path of another parked car.
1. East of Univ. Hospital.
2. Catherine St. north of Vaughn
Residence Hall.
3. West Quad. area at Thomp-
son and Jefferson Sts.
4. Michigan Union Area.
5. College St. between East Med.
and East Hall.
6. Lot behind Univ. Museum ad-
jacent to Forest Ave.
7. Any street which is not clos-
ed by police order.
Improper parking in these areas
which are unrestricted will re-
sult in the same penalties as those
listed above.
All students must secure driving
permits before any driving is done
otherwise they are subject to se-
vere disciplinary action. Permits
may be secured in Rm. 1020 of
the Administration Building.
DRIVING REGULATIONS FOR
SUMMER SESSION 1949
There are certain individuals to
whom these rules do not rapply.
These persons include: students
who are over 26 years of age, those
who in the previous year have en-
gaged in professional pursuits
such as lawyers, doctors, dentists,
teachers, nurses, those holding
faculty rank of teaching fellow or
above and married students.
All other student drivers must
report to Mr. Gwin or Mrs. Saw-
yer in the Office of Student Af-
fairs where they may obtain spe-
cial permits which will enable
them to use their cars for purposes
which are deemed necessary. Any
student may secure a summer per-

mit for recreational use in order
to participate in such outdoor ac-
tivities as golf, tennis, swimming,
boating, etc.
It is to be remembered that
DRIVING PERMITS are NOT
PARKING PERMITS and conse-
quently do not give students the
privilege of parking in restricted
parking areas.
Tickets for "On Borrowed Time"
and all individual plays offered
this summer by the Department
of Speech will be placed on sale
tomorrow morning at 10 a.m. at
the box office, Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater. Season tickets, still avail-
able, are also on sale during the
week. The complete schedule for
the summer drama series is as
follows: June 29-July 2, "On Bor-
rowed Time"; July 6-9 "Life With
Father" July 13-16 "The Glass
Menagerie"; July-20 - 23 "The
White Steed"; August 3, 4, 5, 6,
and 8 "LaBoheme."
Notices
Sale of discarded texts. From
the Text Book Loan collection will
be held in Room 1025 Angell Hall
on Wednesday, June 29, from
12:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Orientation Seminar in Mathe-
matics: Tuesday, June 28, 3 p.m.
Room 3001. Mr. Muffett will speak
on "Rigor Through The Ages."
Tea at 4 p.m.
Sports for Women: All physical
education classes begin on Mon-
day or Tuesday of this week as
scheduled. Tennis and gilf, Wom-
en's Athletic Bldg. All dance clas-
ses, Barbour Gym. Posture, figure
and carriage, and elementary
swimming, Barbour Gymnasium.
Intermediate swimming and life
saving, men's Union pool. Riding,
Golfside Stables. New class in
beginning swimming, has been ar-
ranged for Monday and Wednes-
day at 2:30. Registration Mon-
day, June 27 in Barbour Gymna-
sium. More registrations available
in riding class Tuesday and Thurs-
day, 4:30.
Pi Lambda Theta will hold the
first meeting of the summer Mon-
day, June 27, at 7:30 p.m., in the
West Conference Room of the
Rackham Building.
There will be a short meeting
(Continued on Page 3)

ERROL vIvECA
FLYNN" LINDFORS
in// H
0101U

i

Plus!
Coming
TU ESDA

at 1:45 - 4:55 & 8:15
"BUNGALOW 13" with TOM

Y !

"WHISPERING SMITH"
"AN ACT OF MURDER"

I

- -'~+-~vA-- -'-- .- ________

S

WEEKDAYS
35c to 5 P.M.
TA RTS
TODAY - .

4

CONTI N UOUS
DAILY FROM 1 P.M.

- ---------

AD- AL- -- -- A Amb.AL A A - A A

A-gL
" m -* - ---- - ---- ---------------------------------------- -
EVERYBODY'S FAVORITE STAR.*.
EVERYBODY'S FAVORITE STORY...
Fi
ALL IN TECHNICOLOR!
L -- -- -------.-------------------- -------- - - - - --- - -- --
.Really, Folks,
jitterbugging
was never like I
thisk
-e

TODAY & MONDAY!
Doors Open 1:15 P.M.
at 2:50 - 6:05 & 9:20

CONWAY

_ _
_ _ -- _

=---- .,

Old Town Canoes for Rent
Open Daily- 10 A.M .'til Midnight
CANOE LIVER-Y
Huron River at Longshore Drive - Phone 5004

Special classes in typwriting,
for personal or office use. Hours
arranged at your convenience.
Day and Evening Classes. Phone
7831 or call at our office for
details. No obligation.
HAMILTON
Business College
William at State Phone 7831

-1

,1

+ Classified Advertising

+

11

Broadwa's No. 1 Dramatic StageHit-Now on the screen.

ROOMS
FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM for Male. 3@ blocks
from campus. Large hollywood bed,
tile shower, cool. $4.50 per week.
5750. 906 Greenwood. )14
BUSINESS
SERVICES r
THE STUDENT RATES on TIME and
LIFE apply only to subscriptions or-
dered in the name of a college stu-
dent. But if he leaves school while
the subscription is in force-or even
before it starts, if it is a deferred
order-the rate still applies and the
subscription continues. Moral: order
now while you are enrolled. Student
Periodical Agency. 2-8242. )27
TYPEWRITING SERVICE-Student re-
ports, theses, dissertations. Phone
6197. )28
PIANO INSTRUCTION - Beginners.
Popular and classical. Mrs. Hazel W.
Bross. Ph. 2-6227. )20

ROOM AND BOARD

SUMMER BOARD: Full board for the
remainder of the 8-week summer ses-
sion available at Theta Xi House,
1345 Washtenaw. Phone Bill Dean,
2-5644. )30
BOARD for summer, excellent food,
men only. Call Hs. Mgr. 5806, 1617
Washtenaw. )21
FOR
SALE
LIGHT SUMMER SUIT - Never been
worn. Size 44. E. S. Danner, 322 N.
State, Ph. 2-4254.
1939 PLYMOUTH gray 4-door sedan,
good condition, recent overhaul, $375.
Man's English Bicycle, $25. Ladles'
Bicycle, $15. 1946 G.E. Wringer-type
Washer, good condition, $40. Phone
6336. )26
ABOUT ten spools of recording wire in
good condition $25.00. Write Box 187,
Mich. Daily. )23

SA Paramount Picture wit"

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