100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 27, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUE MICHIGAN DAILY'-'

WEDNESDAY. T

T~lE MWIIC1N L'TT

WT ;.lNFIJ l11V IITV;f417

-a I

NA T URAL RESOURCES:
CIO Official Praises Public Enterprise

Vacationer

"Public enterprise has shown
that it can do the job better ac-
cording to Anthony W. Smith, as-
sistant director of the CIO Indus-
trial Union Councils.
He spoke Monday evening in the
natural resources lecture series on
"The Role of Government in Re-
source Conservation."
* * *
SMITH, WHO said that his
statements represented the views
of the CIO and probably of all
organized labor, described the de-
velopment of the Tennessee Valley
Authority and other government
conservation projects.
"Public enterprise of this kind
is here to stay in America and

more of it is on the way," he
said.
He condemned private enter-
prise as being wasteful and inef-
ficient in the exploitation of na-
tural resources.
"Uncontrolled free enterprise
has not done the job .as it should
have," he said. "That leopard is
not likely to change its spots."
.* * *
SMITH CALLED for govern-
ment control of the oil industry,
because of its wasteful tactics in
the past. He said that the industry
had often burned natural gas in
the field.
Because we are rapidly ex-
hausting our iron ore resources,

OPEN POSITIONS:
Civil Service Commission
Announces Examinations

The U.S. Civil Service Commis-
sion recently announced examina-
tions for filling Industrial Special-
ist, Contract Negotiator, Voca-
tional Rehabilitation Adviser and
Adviser-Specialist positions.
At theisame time, the Board of
U.S. Civil Service Examiners,
Wright-Patterson Air ForceBase,
announced the examination for
filling Air Force Procurement In-
spector positions in various places
throughout hte country.
SALARIES FOR Industrial Spe-
cialists range from $3,727 to $6,235
annually. Successful applicants for
these positions will work in various
Federal agencies in the Washing-
ton, D.C. area.
No written test will be given
applicants for these Jobs. To
qualify, they -must have had
appropriate experience or a
combination of experience and
college study.
Vocational Rehabilitation Ad-
viser and Adviser-Specialist posi-
tions pay from $4,479 to $10,305 a
year. These positions are available
in the Washington area and
throughout the country.
* * *
TO QUALIFY for these positions
applicants must have had appro-
priate college study or technical

experience or a combination of
such experience and study. Also,
they must have had professional
experience in a vocational rehabil-
itation program.
Salaries for the Air Force po-
sitions range from $3,721 to $4,479
a year. To qualify in this exam-
ination, applicants must pass a
written test and must have had
experience or a combination of ex-
perience and education pertinent
to the field for which application
is made.
Further information and appli-
cation forms may be obtained from
the Civil Service Commission's
local representative, Edward Hell-
ner, at the Ann Arbor Post Of-
fice.
Shaw Celebrates
93rd Birthday
AYOT ST. LAWIKNCE, Eng-
land-(Al)-Still needle-sharp in
the wits but a bit shaky in the
legs, George Bernard Shaw turned
93 yesterday.
Impish as ever, the reedy old
sage refused to open any of his
50-congratulatory telegrams.
"He's just putting it off," ex-
plained his housekeeper, Mrs. Alice
Laden.

Smith expects us to have to
import large quantities of ore
from Canada or Latin America,
thus shifting the steel industry
to the east coast.
Timber is also being used up
much more rapidly than it can be
replaced. According to Smith, we
use about 50 million board feet
per year, while we grow only about
35 billion. Thus, reforestation is
a national problem.
TO MEET THIS problem, the
CIO official suggested that the
federal government take over the
management of privately-owned
forest land. This would guarantee
federal regulation of all timber
cutting.
Mismanagement of private
property injures everyone, he said,
including the property owner.
"It is part of our folklore that
every man is entitled to go to
hell in his own way, but I think
we are getting tired of the no-
tion that he is entitled to drag
everyone else with him," Smith
declared. .
Another serious problem, -c-
cording to Smith, is that of soil
erosion. He described the soil sit-
uation as "nothing less than catas-
trophic."
S * * *
HE ESTIMATES that one-half
of our' soil will be washed away in
45 days if present practices con-
tinue.
Smith warned that the public
should not fear increased govern-
mental activity, but that the dan-
ger of a totalitarian government
arises out of anarchy rather than
from a strong, democratically-con-
trolled central government.
Vau ghan Call's
Off Conference
GRAND RAPIDS - (P) - Maj.
Gen. Harry H. Vaughan, President
Truman's military aide, called off
a press conference here yesterday
after he became miffed over re-
porters' questioning.
Gen. Vaughan, here for the Re-
serve Officers Association Conven-
tion, landed at the Qity airport.
A reporter for a Grand Rapids
newspaper started asking him
about the medals he had on his
uniform, the "five per centers" un-
der investigation in Washington
and other matters.
Gen. Vaughan abruptly broke
off the interview. A short time
later his press conference, sched-
uled for 4 p.m., was cancelled. A
captain handling press relations
for the Reserve Officers attributed
the action to the incident at the
airport.
When Feet Were Feet
FOOTVILLE, Wis.-Back in the
days when the foot unit of mea-
surement was based on the actual
length of a human foot, it varied
from 12 inches to twice that
length.

CHAMBERS ON VACATION-Whittaker Chambers, former Time
editor, confessed ex-Communist and chief prosecution witness for-
the Alger Hiss perjury trial, stands still for a moment during
his holiday chores on his farm in Westminster, Md., to pose for
newsreel cameramen and say a few well-chosen words.
WFFoodwind Recital, Band Music
To Spark Conductors' Meet
C..

Arnold Asks'
Labor Anti-
TrstLaw
Ex-Trust Buster
Hits 'Monopoly'
WASHINGTON-(P) -Thurman
Arnold, former "New Deal" trust-
buster, yesterday urged Congress
to bring labor unions under the
federal anti-trust laws.
"It is a very dangerous thing,"
he said, "to permit unions to mo-
nopolize the labor supply without
any curbs whatsoever."
* * * .
ARNOLD TESTIFIED as a wit-
ness before the Senate banking
committee ,which is investigating
the coal industry and the tactics
of John L. Lewis' United Mine
Workers Union.
Senator Robertson (Dem.,
Va.) called for the inquiry as
an outgrowth of a June 30 de-
cree by Lewis setting a three-
day work week for his miners
in the coal fields. Robertson
Monday denounced the abbrev-
iated week as "a bold, overt act"
to fix prices and hold down pro-
duction.'
Arnold was chief of the Justice
Department's anti-trust division
during the late President Roose-
velt's regime and now is in private
law practice in Washington. He
told the Senate committee that
the three-day week was initiated
to create a coal scarcity and thus
place the miners' union in a fa-
vorable position for "the next
strike."
* WITHOUT A CHANGE in the
present anti-trust laws, Arnold
said, it would be easy for unions
and management to get together
and do "the very things which the
anti-trust laws forbid."
He noted that the Supreme
court, in several cases, has vir-
tually exempted unions from
the anti-trust laws.
Therefore, he said, it would be a
simple matter to fix prices and
restrict production-without vio-
lating anti-trust laws-by having
the union "initiate" such a move
and then the employers "give in."
* * *
ARNOLD TOLD the senators
that if the coal operators wanted
to raise their profits, they could
do so by "being acquiescent" to
such a scheme.
. Major coal operators testified
yesterday that Lewis' three-day
week had been "imposed" upon
them over their objections.
Arnold cited a list of what he
termed "illegitimate" activities of
labor unions, and he said the
matter of unions exploiting their
power to fix prices and limit pro-
duction is "the most dangerous of
all. "
"ONCE SUCH A DRIVE gets
going," Arnold said, "operators
may follow their natural inclina-
tions and when they encounter a
demand from a union to increase
prices and restrict production,
they will do it."
The former government lawyer
said that in writing any new labor
laws, Congress should define both
the "legitimate" and "illegitimate"
purposes of unions.

Teachers must together carry on
educational experimentationhand
research in order to approach an
understanding of education for in-
ternational peace.
This opinion was expressed yes-
terday by Margaret Koopman, vis-
iting professor from Central Mich-
igan College of. Education, and di-
rector of the U.S.-Canada work-
shop.
* * *
HER TALK WAS part of the
education school's summer lecture
series.
Educators must be aware of
the fact that -there can be a
third world war which would
involve the children and youth
they teach, she said. And what-
ever holds hope for peace is the
business of every person in edu-
cation, Prof. Koopman added.
She urged educators to support
all movements for fundamental
education , which is defined by
UNESCO as "full and equal op-
portunity for all; unrestrained
pursuit of objective truth; free ex-
change of ideas and knowledge;
education for a constructive way
of life with solution of essential
problems."
A GOOD beginning in this di-
rection would be to extend edu-
cationto disadvantaged people in
Michigan, for example,kthe mi-
grant agriculture workers, she
suggested.
Prof. Koopman urged teachers
GOv. Williams To
Speak at Milan
Gov. G. Mennen Williams will
speak at the Tri-County Farm-
ers' Picnic at noon next Sunday,
July 31, at the Wilson Memorial
Park in Milan.
Also, the Brannan Farm Plan
will be explained by Edward
Meade, -former member of the
State Agricultural Commission
and now an administrative assist-
ant to the governor.
The counties sponsoring the pic-
nic are Washtenaw, Monroe and
Lenawee.

to support movements for inter-
national cooperation through
teachers' clubs and other educa-
tional and professional organi-
zations.
She emphasized that such or-
ganizations were affiliated with
UNESCO, "one true organization
which might birng about solidarity
among peoples who believe in a
peaceful world."
WUOM Will
Air Mozart,
Str'aussToday
WUOM, 91.7 on the FM dial, Will
feature an actual orchestra re-
hearsal, under the direction of
Wayne Dunlap, on the University
Symphony at 3:30 p.m., today.
Some Mozart arias and selec-
tions from Richard Strauss' Der
Rosenkavalier will be presented on
the 7 p.m. Classical Concert.
At 8 p.m. Mozart's Quintet in
E flat major will be offered on a
faculty woodwind recital.
PROGRAM SCHEDULE
F.M.
2:30-Tell Me Professor.
2:45-School of Music.
2:55-Daily Bulletin.
3:00-Campus Varieties.
3:30-University Symphony.
4:00-Campus News.
4:15-The Beaver's Tale. a
4:30-Requestfully Yours.
5:00-Books by Radio.
5:15-Adventures in Research.
5:30-Children's Story.
5:45-Guest Star.
6:00-Dinner Music.
7:00-Classical Concert.
8:00-Faculty Woodwin Recital.
Barbarians
ATHENS - The ancient .Greeks
considered anyone who was not a
Greek a barbarian, according to
Greek anthropologists.
Today the word has acquired a
meaning which refers to lack of
taste.

'.

-4

EDUCATION TA LK:
Teachers Told To Carry
On Own Experimentation

Riding Horses For Hire
EXCEPTIONALLY FINE
NEW HORSES
Instructions Available
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Golfside Stables
GENE BLAND, Mgr.
3250 E. Huron River Dr. Ph. 7772
(X=> {==()==)G (X=> =:><-o<=>o< =>o< ==>o<==>o- j
Today -Prices Reduced!
20-50% Off on All Items
Many unusual and original gifts from the Orient.O
0 M nINDIA ART SHOP
330 Maynard Phone 2-3600O
a<;;;>< >4o <;;>cp o< <;> ;;;0 oc;;> < >o

As a part of the Band Con-
ductors' Conference -Workshop
this week a faculty woodwind re-
cital will be held at 8 p.m. today
in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
Thursday the Summer Session
Band will give an open-air con-
cert at 7 p.m. in the Law Quad.
The band will be under the direc-
tion of its regular conductor, Wil-
liam D. Revelli.
* *, *
PARTICIPATING in the wood-
wind recital will be instructors
Lare Wardrop, oboe; Ted M.
Evans, French horn; Albert Lu-
coni, clarinet; Lewis Cooper, bas-
soon; and Mischa Meller, professor
of piano.
The program will include
"Quartet in F Major by Rossini;
Rivier's "Petite Suite"; and
"Quintet in E Flat Ma'jir" by
Mozart.
"Zanoni," an abstract tone poem
written especially for the Univer-
sity band by Paul Creston, will be
given its world premiere by the
band.
* * *
PHILIP LANG, guest lecturer
in band arranging, will conduct
three of his own compositions and
arrangements: "The Big Top,"
"Do-Si-Do" and "Gypsy Airs."

Another highlight of Thurs-
day's concert will be a cornet
trio.
Lang has appeared on many
University occasions as guest con-
ductor and lecturer. Also known
on Broadway, he orchestrated the
music for the hits "Annie Get
Your Gun,"' "High Button Shoes,"
and the current hit "Where's
Charlie," featuring Ray Bolger.
* * *
DURING THE coming year,
Lang plans to work on two new
musicals, Vernon Duke's "He and
She" and Jule Styne's "Gentle-
men Prefer Blondes."
Attendance to the Conference
has increased to 500 after the
first two days of the week-long
program, according to Revelli,
conference chairman. Twenty-nine
states and Canada are now rep-
resented, he added.
Bringing Up Baby
BROOKFIELD, Ill.-Mischievous
griaffe youngsters can't get away
with anything, according to zoo
keepers.
Mama giraffe has eyes which let
her see behind and to the sides
without turning her head.

li - - taste_ _

PHOTOGRAPHIC
SUPPLIES

ANSCO- DU

PONT- EASTMAN

films -papers-chemicals
Purchase Radio & Camera Shop

LIA5L

I

Phone 8696

Church at S. University

L

-

L

BUSINESS
SERVICES

4 V4

r

%'

Save, on our
STUDENT
BUNDLE!.
All clothing laundered, fluff dried, and neatly folded.
4 BS. MINIMUM ......50c
Each Additional Pound ... 12c
The following articles are finished at low extra charges
OS follows--
SHIRTS, additional..... .15c
HANDKERCHIEFS ..... 3c
SOX, pair ............. 5c,
Dress shirts and silk or wool sport shirts slightly higher.
PICK-UP and DELIVERY SERVICE
Phone 23-1-23

STUDENTS MAY ORDER subscriptions
to TIME or LIFE at the student rates
to be sent to their home address or
any other address they choose. As
long as the subscription is in the stu-
dent's name, the Student Rate ap-
plies. Order now-pay when, billed.
Student Periodical Agency. Phone
6007. )116
LEARN TO DANCE
JIMMIE HUNT DANCE STUDIOS
209 S. State St. Ph. 8161 )5B
GROUP PICTURES taken. Candid
wedding pictures avspecialty. C.W.
Nichols,. 711 S. Division. Ph. 5333.
TYPEWRITING SERVICE
Student reports, theses, dissertations.
Phone 6197. )28
WE BIND THESES, term papers and
dissertations in a variety of styles and
colors.
OLSEN'S BINDERY
325 E. Hoover Phone 2-7976 )1
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2
FOR
SALE
SCHWINN light weight girls bicycle, 3
speed 'gears, hand brakes. One year
old, good condition. Also portable
long play or regular speed phono-
graph small three-way portable radio.
All new and in good shape. Box 387.
New Women's Residence. . )114
REDUCED PRICES-Men's loafers $3.88;
U.S. Navy T-shirts 49c; wash slacks
$2.66; sport shirts, short-sleeves $1.69;
men's sport shorts $1.49; all wool
swim trunks $1.49. Open 'til 6:30.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )113
AMATEUR RADIO transmitting parts,
one complete ten meter transmitter,
exceptional values. Call 8774 and ask
for Keith-evenings. )112
PARRAKEETS make delightful, inex-
pensive pets. Easily trained to talk
and whistle. Also canaries, bird sup-
plies and cages. Mrs. Ruffins, 562 So.
Seventh. )88a

TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING MONTANA Aug. 13-14. Riders
all or part way. Byers 2-4951. )115
WANTED-Three Passengers. to Yellow-
stone Park. Leaving Aug. 14. Phone
Shirley Austin, 8146. )110
LOST
l and
FOUND
WALLET LOST in Library July 20.
Contents neededtdesperately.rKeep
money. Return to Gen. Library or
send to Irene Zavell, 826 Tappan. )11

WANTED TO RENT
WANTED -Unfurnished apartment or
house, one or more bedrooms, for
newly-appointed professor and wife.
Occupancyas soon as possible. Rent
up to $150 month; will buy if nec-
essary. Write full details to Walter
Sanders, 235 East 72nd Street, New
York 21, N.Y. )149
WANTED
RESPONSIBLE YOUNG WOMAN or
couple to stay in professor's home
while family on vacation. Approx.
from Aug. 15 to Sept. 20. Call 5545.
)106

WORK-Full time, any kin
Cal Leedy at 8257.

FINAL,

id. Contact
)92

CLEARANCE

of

Ladies' Shoes

A

group

of sandal types,

Casuals and Sports styles
ALL AT ONE PRICE

$3 3
(THIS WEEK ONLY)

i

I

I

U

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan