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July 27, 1949 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-27

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T 27, 1949

THIE MICHIGAN DAILY

MINNOW

Gay 'Beach Bail
Seashore Theme Will Prevail
In League Ballroom Saturday

Will Climax Summer

Dances

'U' Students on European Tour Impressed
By Friendly Dutch, Queen Julianna'sCharm

COURSES IN
&Site4 jn4 On aental Peh tnhip
The Early-way method can solve your writing problems.
Service Dept. for All Kinds of Writing -
Greeting Cards, Name Cards, Bookplates

C3

The League Ballroom will be
transformed into a gala seaside
scene when the "Beach Ball" is
presented from 9 p. m. to 1 a. m.
Saturday.
Del Elliott and his orchestra
will provide the musical side of
the inforrbal dance, which con-
cludes the League's series of sum-
mer aances.
* * *
ELLIOTT'S BAND .has been,
Weddcings&
Engagements
Stevenson-Beers
The engagement and approach-
ingmarriageofnMiss Helen Mar-
garet Stevenson to Richard L.
Beers, son of Mr. and Mrs. Claude
W. Beers of Dearborn, Mich., has
been announced by her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. James Stevenson of
. Detroit.
Both are students at the Uni-
versity. Mr. Beers is affiliated
with Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity.
Dice-Foster
The engagement of Miss Do-
rothy Dice to John A. Foster, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Fos-
ter of Norman, Okla., has been
announced by her parents, Prof.
and Mrs. L. R. Dice of Ann Ar-
bor.
Miss Dice, a member of Alpha
Lambda Delta and Phi Kappa Phi
honorary societies, is a senior in
the Literary College.

featured every Friday and Satur-
day night for the informal stag
or drag affairs. Beth Skidmore,
regular songstress with the band,
avu1 do the vocal honors.
In keeping with the informal-
ity of the dance women attend-
ing will don blue jeans, sunback
dresses, skirts and blouses, or
informal cattons. Coeds will be
granted 1:30 a. m. late permis-
sion.
Men will wear sport shirts aid
slacks.
* * *
DECORATIONS WILL carry
out the beach theme with an as-
sortment of aquatic animals, sea-
weed and sand. Gay beach um-
brellas will be arranged at inter-
vals along the shore.
Mal Thomas will MC. the
floorshow, which will feature, an
impersonator, dancersrand a
soloist. Nando Gutierrez will
give impersonations of well
known persons including Jim-
my Durante. Mr. and Mrs. Ray-
mond Hatch from the Jimmy
Hunt Dance Studios will pre-
sent ballroom dancing. Soloist
will be Ruth Campbell.
Refreshments of hot dogs and
soft drinks will be available.
* * *
PATRONS INCLUDE Dr.. and
Mrs. Louis Ifopkins, Dr. and Mrs.
George McEwen, Prof. and Mrs.
Arthur Bromage, Dean and Mrs.
Walter Rea, Mrs. Elsie Fuller and
Dr. Margaret Bell.
The list continues with Prof.
and Mrs. Benjamin Wheeler, Mr.
and Mrs. Walter Kupsch, Miss
thel McCormick and Miss Mar-
garet Morgan.

By PATSY PARKIN
(Special to The Daily)
COLOGNE, Germany-Although
only two weeks have passed since
I boarded the S.S. Volendam in
Quebec, I feel that I've had enough
experiences to fill a book; experi-
ences encountered during the ten
day voyage and during the four
days I spent in Holland.
Life on board ship was filled
with planned daily activities such
as movies, dances, lectures, dis-
cussions and deck games. Here
fifteen hundred students from
many colleges in the United
States, Canada and the Nether-
lands lived like one large family;
all members having similar goals
for the summer.
There were about forty students
on the ship from the University
of Michigan and at several re-
unions we had a marvelous time.
* * *A
FOR GIRLS, blue jeans were the
accepted attire for informal activ-
ities, but once in Rotterdam,
Sandy Brown and I found our-
selves the objects of many staring
eyes. The jeans immediately
branded us as Americans and my
Suits Combine

saddle shoes helped in this iden-
tification process also.
I found the people in Holland
very friendly and eager to help
us. One Dutch girl walked a mile
out of her way to take us to the
train station. In the cities, the
girls look well fed and well
dressed, although the "new look"
is not prevalent. The girls
seemed to admire American stu-
dents and many expressed a de-
sire to visit America.
It wasn't until I saw the quaint
Dutch villages of Maaken and
Valendam, where everyone dresses
in old Dutch costumes and wears
wooden shoes, that I felt apart
from modern civilization. In the
cities, the Dutch girls seemed
much like Americans but in these
villages, wearing ancient costumes,
hair in braids and wearing no lip-
stick, they might well have been
living in the 1700's.
* * *
BUT IT ALWAYS takes an oc-
currence to make a visit to a
country memorable. Sandy had a
cablegram from Queen Julianna's
private secretary saying the Queen
would be happy to see us when we
were in Holland. This was due to
Sandy's having known her when
she stayed in Massachusetts dur-
ing the war.
After arriving in Hague, we
found that the Queen was in

Soestdijk, but before leaving we
were shown through the Royal
Palace in our blue jeans which
were not worthy of the atmo-
sphere of marble, gilt and plush
in this seventeenth century pal-
ace. But in Soestdijk, we
changed into dresses in case we
would be lucky enough to meet
Queen Julianna.
After talking to guardis, officers,
a private secretary and sending
a note to the Queen herself, we
were told we could meet her. So
accompanied by a private secre-
tary we walked up the winding
driveway past the glassed in porch
and to an entrance to the right
of the main entrance.
THERE IN THE doorway stood
Queen Julianna wearing a rust,
or maybe orange in Holland, dress
and white sandals. We shook
hands and enjoyed talking in-
formally to this attractive friendly
woman.
A limousine drove up and a
chauffeur helped the queen's
eldest daughter out. This little
girl, Trixie, will probably be the
next ruler of the Netherlands.
Our visit lasted about five min-
utes because the Queen was hold-
ing a conference. So, hardly able
to believe this actually happened,
we walked down the driveway and
to the station, en route for Col-
ogne, Germany.

CLASSES
8 A.M. - 8 P.M. (Monday thru Friday)
8 A.M. - 12 Noon (Saturday)

P ehmanehIi $tu~ik

AAw

402 12 Observatory

Phone 2-8606

~~-_ _ - _ _ __- _ V

IHOGRAPHING

QUICK SERVICE
COLORS
MIMEOG
You type sic
EDWARDS I
711 North University

ECONOMICAL

and DESIGN
=RAPTING
ncils or we will.

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SIDEWALK SCOOTER-Linda
Mason, film actress, travels 8
miles an hour on her scooter-
with-engine in Hollywood.
Will 0' ip
.. ..by Bely Crawford
"Swing your pardner, now
promenade right and promenade
left." And Dave and Lee Palmer
had everyone in the swing at the
"Country Capers" dance last Sat-
urday at the University Commun-
ity Center.
The heat didn't keep away a
crowd of over a hundred and
many newcomers to the village
were there. Mr. and Mrs. Court-
land Geib of 1477 Lennox, Mr.
and Mrs. Donald Thering who re-
cently moved to the village from
Ann Arbor and Mr. and Mrs.
Keith Sloan, 1268 Danvers, were
among the latest villagers who
donned overalls and pinafores to
learn to square dance.
Mr. and Mrs. Roland Gum-
precht came western in jodphurs
and plaid shirts, strictly Montana
style. Mrs. Charles Sinclair tend-
ed the rustic bar and served cokes
under a fetching picture of the
"White Rock girl."
Hats off to Mrs. Charles D.
Pierce, 1484 Metcalf for a won-
derful time.
ON TUESDAY, August 2, the
Village Nursery Group will hold
a reception at 8 in the evening in
honor of the nursery teacher, Mrs.
D. E. Morley and her assistant,
Mrs. Jeffrey Howes. Also among
the honored guests will be Mrs.
Victor Zerbi, Mrs. W. W. Gardner,
Mrs. David. E. Del Zell and Miss
Wilson from the Management Of-
fice.
Mrs. Charles A b b i t t, 1599
Springfield is Chairman of the re-
ception which will be for all
mothers of nursery children.

Smart

Tweeds

With Woolens
Fine fabrics have teamed up
with the new suit in flagging eyes
to its 1950 look.
Tweeds are a perfect example
of the glance-pulling materials.
Whether fine or coarse-grained,
nubby or smooth, homespun look-
ing or highly textured, tweed is
an eye-catcher. Surprise colors,
such as mauve and curry-yellow,
accentuate its virtue.
To aid the tweed in its tack of
appeal, woolens that are best
teamed with it, such as jersey and
woolknits, are used in making the
suave blouses and lining the jack-
ets of many of the fall's smartest
ensembles.
One of the smartest of these
ensembles is the suit with the
new, long, roomy jacket that
doubles as a three-quarter length
topper. Brigance designs this suit
of curry-colored. tweed, which has
a peg-topped skirt with a 13-inch
high hemline, a brown leather
belt, and a jacket-lining and
blouse of curry-colored jersey.
Kasha cloth stages a comeback
to give dressy suits their look of
fall elegance. A kasha cloth as
colorless as oatmeal makes a
newsworthy suit of Martini's de'-
sign.
It Grows as It Goes
BRAINTREE, Mass. - At birth
the human brain has acquired
more than one-fourth of its adult
size, according to local brain mea-
surers.
The average child of six has a
brain nine-tenths the size of the
adult brain.

Pre-Orientation Training Slated
For Coed Dormitory "Staffs

Time and Money!
Takes: Only one half-hour
Costs: Only 25c a load

K
p .

:
.
:
',
:t
,

LETTER SHOP
Phone 2-2846

'1

Save Yourself

Along with the announcement
of the new resident counselor sys-
tem to become effective in the fall
has come from the office of the
Dean of Women a pre-orientation
training program planned for all
staff members of women's resi-
dences.
Conducted by the Dean of
Women and her staff of colleagues,
the program, to take place Sept.
15 to 17, will include morning and
afternoon sessions of discussion
and guidance on all phases of
dormitory staff relations and re-
sponsibilities.
The program will begin with a
definition of resident staff re-
sponsibilities and survey of the
University calendar for the aca-
demic year. Introduction will be
made of all members of resident
staff to each other and resident
counselors will be assigned to in-
dividual students and student
committees.
* * *
STAFF MEMBERS will become
better acquainted with responsi-
bility to students through infor-
mation given on standards and
regulations concerning student af-
fairs, conduct and discipline and
description of campus resources,
student organizations and activi-
ties for referral purpoges.
. Also to be explained and dis-
cussed are student government
offices, house traditions, plans
for reception of new and old girls

and plans for the initial house
meetings with students.
New resident counselors who
will begin their advisory work in
the fall for Jordan are Leonelia
Wilcox, Georgianna Benesh, Bev-
erly Ann Smith and Dorothy E.
Nichols.
MOSHER COUNSELORS will be
Carolyn H. Pautke, Gertrude Mul-
hollan, Beverly A. Dippel and Jane
Shaw.
Serving the New Women's
Dormitory will be Louise Duus,
Thelma M. Jenson, Rita Cahp-
man, Ilene M. Scanlon, Florence
Rosenberg, Betty L. Flkdeland,
Elsbeth H. Wallace and Elmira
Koehler.
In Stockwell counselors will be
Dorothy E. Inglis, Norma Davis,
Betty M. McGolrick, Doris A. Sira-
bian, Louise Salley, Sophia L. Hol-
ley, Mary L. MacDonald, Mary L.
Gabel, and Ruth E. Spore.
ISABELLE P. RAESIDE will be
the counselor for Barbour and
Catherine A. Cole will serve for
Newberry.

the self -service

Cal I for appointments.

Dryers Available

Try doing your laundry

4

H/auFHdma
HALF-HOUR LAUNDRY

Way.

k It

.., . . .-.
- d ..

510 E. Williams

Phone 5540

Z._

i a I - -.1

_ _ .,

"'It all happened when I looked at that girl with a
STAEBLER BEAUTY SHOP hair style!"
STAEBLER BEAUTY SHOP
601 E. Liberty Phone 8878'

The

rrm-=

FINAL CLEARANCE

of

Shoes

SHOW TUNES
from
MUSICAL COMEDY AND OPERETTA
DECCA ALBUMS AT
50% OFF

£/iyabeth 41illo. £hop
MONTH-END
EXTRA SPECIALS
for Wednesday Only

°a;
in,
r
i
e
a.

II

r

Your choice of all remaining
MADEMOISELLE and
TONI DRAKE
Summer Footwear

PORGY AND BESS
Original Cast

Usually NOW
$5.08 $2.54
5.51 2.76

$10

IA

OKLAHOMA
Original Cast

SING OUT SWEET LAND 5.51
Burl Ives, Alfred Drake

Orig. 8.95 and 10.95
$5w

DESERT SONG-
Wilbur Evans, Kitty Carlisle

4.72

2.76
2.36
2.76

300 DRESSES - Crepes, Prints, Shan-
tungs, Bembergs, Better Cottons. Evening
and Dinner Gowns, many originally to
$29.95. Sizes 9 - 15,10 - 44,14/2-24%.

.
r,
1

MERRY WIDOW- --.---5.51
Wilbur Evans, Kitty Carlisle
AND MANY OTHERS

Also albums by Burl Ives, Fred Waring, Joseph
Marais, Guy Lombardo, Bing Crosby and other fa-
mous Decca artists on sale at

25 SUMMER SUITS - Pastel and Whites.
Sizes 9 to 15, 10 to 20 . . . originally to $19.95.
PLAYSUITS that double as Dresses - 1 piece with separate
skirts. Sizes 10 to 20 . . . originally to $16.95.

50% OFF

I

U

iI

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