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June 26, 1948 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1948-06-26

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"1g4 TIE lJ1 IC HL IGAN 7ILY

[ouis Overcomes I nock own i 25th

Title Defense

AAU Finals
AttractEih
BLOOMFIELD, N. J., June 25--
(J)-A half dozen or so of the na-
tion's greatest all-around athletes
emerged as top contenders for
three U. S. Olympic berths as 22
hopefuls gathered for the National
A.A..U. Decathlon championships
tomorrow and Sunday at Foley
Field.
The title games have been de-
elared the final Olympic tryouts
for the iron men.
One of the leading entries, Lloyd
Duff of Ohio State, last year's
runner up, was forced by injuries
to scratch at the last moment, Al
# Post, New Jersey A.A.U. president
and meet director, announced to-
day.
Bob Mathias of Tulare High
School, Calif., the 17-year-old fa-
vorite has the best previous score
of the entries. He rolled up 7,094
in a West Coast meet in which
6 Floyd Simmons, Ios Angeles A.C.,
scored 6,860.
- - _

Olympic Fund
200 Thousand
(Special to The Daily)
CHICAGO, Ill., June 25-.-With
the date for the embarkation of
the U. S. Olympic team less than
three weeks away the Olympic
fund lacks more than $200,000 of
the amount needed for the team's
expenses.
While several contributions are
anticipated within the next two
weeks, from official tryouts and
fund-raising campaigns current-
ly being staged in many cities,
there still is the possibility that
some squads may be curtailed for
lack of funds.
The U. S. Olympic committee
recently affirmed its policy to the
effect that only those teams for
which there are adequate funds in
the treasury will be sent to the
Olympic Games.
Order of Preference
In the event of incomplete fi-
ancing, the teams will be sent in
the following order :track and
field for men, swimming and div-
ing for men and women, boxing
basketball, wrestling, rowing,
equestrian, track and field for
women, gymnastics, fencing for
men and women, soccer, weight
lifting, rifle and pistol shootirig,
water polo, modern penthathlon,
cycling, yatching, canoeing and
field hockey.
The Olympic committee has es-
timated that it will cost more than
$500,000 to equip, transport, feed
and house the proposed team to
be sent to the London Games.
_ _ _-_

MICHIGAN
LAST TIMES TODAY

IN Tis CORNER - -
by JOE WALSH, Sports Editor
N THE ORDINARY run of things, the reading public doesn't en-
counter much crime news on the sport page. However, occasionally
some leading figure in the world of sport becomes involved with the
long arm-and as result a question arises.
The question is, "Does criminal liability necessarily involve
formal ostracizing from the professional sport world?"
It has been mulled over many times. Most notable instance was
the 1919 Black Sox scandal. At that time the major leagues hired a
federal judge from Illinois, Kenesaw Mountain Landis, to settle the
dispute.
More recently, the Rocky Graziano case was brought to pub-
lie attention. Now as it stands, The Rock is banned from display-
ing his talents in New York and cooperating states, and in states
adhering to rules of the NBA.
A grand-jury no-billed the case of the State vs. Graziano in the
alleged attempted bribe offer of a year and a half ago. Yet the New
York State Athletic Commission threw the book at Rocky. Later
when Graziano's dismissal (to say the least) Army record was brought
to night, the NBA saw fit to inflict further punishment and ruled the
New Yorker from appearing in states under their control.
The crux of the thing appears to be this. Once a man pays a pen-
alty for commission of deeds against society, is he given a clean bill
of health after that penalty is paid?
Society cleared Rocky. He paid his debt. Sure, he didn't go over-
seas and maybe pick up a few holes for his trouble. That's pretty se-
rious I guess, but is it any worse than the crime of murder? The way
the East Sider is being treated, one would certainly think his crime,
had been at least one of the heinous variety.
The whole shebang started when it was learned that Rocky had
been approached by some New York hood with an offer of $100,000 in
return for Rocky's taking a dive against one Reuben "Cowboy" Shank,
a so-so pug from Denver.
CONSIDER Rocky's plight. If he said yes, chances are word
would leak, as word usually dops, and he'd really be in the
soup. Or let's suppose, just for a change, that Grazianol has a
decent bone or two in his body, and he figured that going into
the tank wasn't the right thing to do. "
Now if he said no, he was still be exposed to a certain danger.
Gang reprisals are not uncommon in Big Town. And after all, to
Henry Ford II, a hundred grand is carfare, but to guys like Rocky
and you and me, "them ain't pennies." Let's suppose that "Golden
Boy" had turned in the punk, where would he have been? Could be
that he would be found in a concrete kimono in the East River some
bleak morning. Such things have been known to happen. Now the
East River isn't a bad river, but it can't look particularly attractive to
someone pulled from its depths with grappling hooks by the NYFD.
Now Eddie Eagen is the boxing commissioner of the Empire State
and he says that Rocky committed a monstrous wrong to society by
his failure to report the bribe. Eagen may be right-he's been right
before, but after all, what good would Rocky's informing do? Would
it stop cheap hoodlums from trying to turn a dishonest buck by get-
ting a fight fixed? Would it stop gambling on sporting events, Would
they erect a statue of Graziano on 8th Avenue? I doubt it. Yet
Rocky can no longer fight in his home town. Was he so crooked? Well
maybe some people think so, but this reporter for one still believes
that Rocky, certainly no angel, got the worst of a one-sided deal.
In the case of his DD from the Army, it is estimated that
16,000 men are walking the streets with yellow discharges in
their pockets. Not a nice thing, certainly. A terrible thing. But
does it give any group the right to take from a man his means of
livelihood? That's all Rocky knows--his hands.
Could be that yours truly is all wet. But in spite of the import of
a crime, whether committed by Bill Tilden or Dutch Schultz, if the in-
mate when released makes an attempt to earn an honest living, we
do not believe it is not the the right of the public or any sanctimonious
athletic commission, regardless of the reasons, to rob that individual
of his right to work.
But, as I said before, could be we're all wet.

Major Leawle
Stanidiiip
Yest rday': Results
New York 7, Cincinnati 0
ostad 12,h ittsurh :;3
Brooklyn 3, fSt. LouEis 2?
lPhiladlelphlia 2, Chicrag o I

(Contnued 1fr n Page 1)

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Boston...., ..
St. Louis .. .
Pittsburgh ...
New York.
Brooklyn.
Philadelphia
Cincinnati . ,
hicagj. ....

W L Pet.,
35 25 .583
33 26 .558
:2l 27 .542
32 27 .542
27 29 .482
29. 32 .475
26 37 .411
24 35 .4

GB
2t
2
(1
6 ~
10'+
f1
(3-2)}

-Loinbar i (3-5) or Se tweli

vs Voiselle (7-4)............
..St. Luis at B-rookIyn-fearn
(4-2) Or Dickson (5-5) vs Hatten
(5-4) Cincinnati at New York--
Vander' Meer' (2-7) vs Kennedy
(0-1)
Chicago at Phiadeip hia-Rushif
(2-4) vs Itowe (2-3)

Yest~erdays's Results
Washington 3, Cleveland
Philadelphia 4, Chicago 1
Detroit 4, New York 2
SL Louis 9, Boston G6
MIb:iRTcAN L EAGUEF

2

and three-steppedu away from
the advancing champion.
Twice the referee warned the
boys to "get in there and fight."
One of the greatest champions
the ring had known, Louis was a
badly battered sight in the early
rounds with his left eye swollen
half shut frn Walcott's stabbing
left.
Twice he caught Walcott and
let him get away after refusing
to chase him in the first part of
thre scrap. In7 the early stages
Louis was concentrating on the
body, sticking left hands to the
stomach of Jersey Joe who has
known 34 lean and hungry years
as a run-of-the-mill battler.
Then he started to gu upstairs
with the left jab he has been
sharpening at Ponipton Lakes,
N.J. There was no question
about the power of those jabs
as compared to Walcott's flick-
ing slaps.
At the time of the knockout,
just as in the first Billy Conn fight,
Louis was trailing on the score
cards of two of the three officials.
Fullam had the champion out
front by a 5-2 margin with three
even. Judge Jack O'Sullivan had
Walcott ahead 5-4 with one even.
Judge Harold Barnes gave the
challenger a wide edge, 6-3, with
one even. The Associated Press
scoreboard had it all even, five
rounds for each.
But Louis wiped out any disad-
vantage he may have had on the
score sheets with the fury of that
right handed assault.
After pinning Jersey Joe on
the ropes with a smashing right;
he jarred him from head to
heels with another right to the
head and then cut loose with all
the frenzy of a wounded jungle
beast closing in for the kill.
Once Walcott sagged and start-
ed to go, Louis hammered him to
the floor with an attack that he
hasn't shown since pre-war days.
Walcott tumbled down and
turned on his back. At the count
of seven he started to come

Euld Comes
C:I mpI3las

Quickly as Parker' Upset
!s Contender At Wilbedon
Bergel n, Swedish
' , , . Ace, Conquers Yank
LONDON, June 25-(4)-Len-
nart Bergelin, a long-legged Swede
with a boarding house reach,
pulled one of the classic upsets of
Wimbledon tennis histor toda
when he defeated Frankie Parker
of Los Angeles in a gripping five
,set struggle on the center court.
The 32-year-old American star,
seeded first and a heavy favoijte
Sin the in es title went don
¢::.by scorers of 5-7, 7-5, 9-7,0-G,
; : :10-8, after more than three hours
of play before 15,000 exhausted
fans.
Brown-Mulloy Win
The Bergelin-Parker duel com-
pletely overshadowed everything
else on the fifth day's program,
which saw two Americans, Tom
: : Brwn of San Francisco and
Gardnar Mulloy. of .Miami, Fla.,
proceed into the men's quarter-
JOE LOUIS finals.
...still king Brown, slowly rounding into
* * form, put out Dilip Bose, an In-
around and began to pull himself dian Davis Cupper, 4-6 8-6, 6-4,
together. At nine, it looked as 6-4, while Mulloy trounced Jack
though he might make it but Harper of Australia, 7-5, 6-0, 6-4.
Fullam tolled the fatal ten before gaining revenge for a beating
he could get off the canvas. Haiper gave him two weeks ago.
- ~ -- - _--- --

#>

Cleveland ... .
Phiiladel phia ..
New York . ....
Bcston ...,. .,
Dettroit. ....
Chicago.....
Pittsburgh at

W L Pet. GB
5 22 .14 .. .
3>7 26 .587 1
.," t5 .58, I 1
29 28 .5(18 6
9 :to .491 7
23 ,.396 i12
18 36 .333 15
Bosto- (Night)

ENROLL NOW

"Open All Day
Sunday" at the
DEN
to serve you
"JUST GOOD FOOD"
at reasonable prices
1311 South U.

I

9.fl NI S It.IXI RINfltphdtjL r6IPICE
-- Also -_\
Henry Busse Orchestra
CARTOON
NEWS

MEN OF
DISTINCTION?:
Choose the "Personality for
Crew-Cut" for that suave,
collegiate look!! Styled to
please you. 7 Barbers - No
Waiting. 8:30 A.M. to 5:30
P.M.
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State and Mich. Theatre

Philadelphia at Chica go-Peir-
etti (1-2) vs Brissi (5-6)
Boston at St. Louis-Galehotuse
(1-3)vs Garver (2-5)
Washington at Cleveland -
Scarborough (5-4) vs. Muncriel'
(4-1)
New York at Detroit-Reynolds
(8-3) vs Trucks (4-4)
AP port Flash1es
NEW YORK, June 25-(IP)-
Ray Poat turned in his third shut-
out and his sixth victory of the
season today, pitching the New
York Giants to a 7-0 triumph
over the Cincinnati Reds. ,Johnny
Mize flit his 15th homer of the
year with one on in the first in-
g-_
NE-W YORK, June 25-,P)-
nSty the aging hut t ough ol
Srace txrackc camacignaer┬░, steps cout
tomorrow to try andi repeat his
1947 victory in the Aqueduct
Handicap and net another $20,-
000 in his goal to become rac-
ing's first million dollar winner.
** *
CHICAGO, June 25 - () --
Three-tine champion Babe Did-
rikson Zaharias today blasted
Helen Dettweiler of Indio, Calif., 6
and 4, in their semi-final match
of the 19th Women's Western
Open Golf Tourney.
ROYAL PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
I N STOCK
foreign Language Keyboards
Also Available
GUARANTEED
REPAIR WORK
RENTAL TYPEWRITERS
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
SERVICE CO.
111 So. Fourth Ph. 2-1213

330 Nickels Arcade

- I

TY PING and SH OR TH AN D

fior

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ANN ARBOR BUSINESS SCHOOL

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Phone 2-0330

'

35c Daily until 5 o'clock
Shows Continuous from 1 P.M.

-

FOR QUICK, DEPEN DABLE
SERVICE BY ANN ARBOR'S LARGEST
FL EET OF TWO-WAY RADIO-
DISPATCHED CABS
CALL:
VETERANS CAMPUS VARSITY
4500 4545 448
"Your cab is as close as your telephone"
ii
THE A RT CINEMA L EAGUE PRESENTS
EXCELLENT---New Yorker'
MUJST SEE-Herald-Tribune
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+ Classilied Advertisingr

''

I

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, D.D., Minister
Frieda Op't Holt Vogan, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.-Morning Worship. Dr. Lemon's
sermon topic-"The Maturity of Religion."
5:00 P.M:.-Summer Guild meets in the
Lewis Parlor. Discussion on "What Is
Christianity" led by Dr. Lemon. Refresh-
ments will follow at 6:00 P.M. All summer
students and friends welcome.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CH URCH
State and William Streets
Minister-Reverend Leonard A. Parr, D. D.
Student Ministry-Reverend H. L. Pick-
erill, Assistant, Miss Jean Garee.
Director of Music-Mr. Wayne Dunlap.
Organist, Mrs. Mary Gwin.

WANTED TO BUY
WANTED:-Tuxedo, size 42 long. In
good condition. Ph. Ypsi, 1450J4. )35
FOR SALE
1947 SERVI-CYCLE, used very little.
$195. 207 Miller Ave. )36
TYPEWRITERS-12 and 14 inch car-
riage. Good condition. Call 2-7490 af-
ter 5:30 p.m. )22
ALUMINUMWARE, dishes, rugs, ma-
hogany bedroom suite, living room
furniture. Phone 2-1512. )25
MAN'S ENGLISH BIKE: Three speed,
hand brakes. Call 6681. )28
GAS STOVE, 4-burner, A&B, $40. Wash-
ing machine, Universal with many
new parts, $65. Small child's tri-
cycle, $3.50. Combination bottle-gas
and coal and wood table-top model
stove, practically new, $125. Every-
thing in good condition. Call 2-
9020. )38
NEW COLEMAN oil space heater. Cost
$92, sale price $45. Oil drums includ-
ed. Owner moving noon June 25th.
Phone 3574W11, Ypsi. 1577 Spring-
field, Willow Run. )33
CHEVROLET, 1937 master coupe. Radio,
heater. Motor and steering gear re-
cently overhauled. Nearly new bat-
tery, $345. 1359 Rosewood.
)8

BUSINESS SERVICES
RELIABLE, expeciencecl student will
care for children afternoons, eve-
nings, weekends. Joan Neff, 9388.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: All white puppy, small male,
vicinity of campus Tuesday. No iden-
tification. Reward. Call 6630. )27
ROYAL No. 2 iron. University Golf
Course. Jurie 16. Reward. Call 2-6292.
)14
ROOMS FOR RENT
CLOSE TO CAMPUS, can accommodate
graduate students or teachers for
suhmer and fall terms. Furnished
suites and part of double room avail-!
able now. Plenty of hot water, show-
er, etc. Reasonable Call 509 S. Divi-
sion St. near Jefferson
)19
6-ROOM APARTMENT with private'
entrance needs 1 male graduate stu-
dent for summer. 1 block from earn-
-pus. Tel. 29130.
)15
UNUSUALLY lovely double room for a
married couple, two men, or two
women. Close to campus Phone 4546.
)32
DOUBLE ROOM available for summer
and fall. Phone 2-0545. 335 E. Jeffer-
son St. )31

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CH URCH
Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.=Holy Communion.
8:45 A.M.-Student breakfast, Canterbury
House (218 No. Division) . Reservations,
2-4097.
11:00 A.M.-Nursery, Tatlock Hall.
11:00 A.M.-Morning Prayer. Sermon by the
" Rev. Henry Lewis.
12:15 P.M.-Student Reception, Canterbury
House.
5:00 P.M1--Canterbui'y Club Picnic. The
Rev. William Clebsch, Episcopal Chaplain
at Michigan State College, will lead the
discussion on "Christianity and Freedom."
Reservations, 2-4097.
Tuesday (St. Peter the Apostle),'7:15 A.M.-
Holy Communion.
Wednesday, 7:15 A.M.-Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by breakfast at Canterbury House;
reservations 2-4097).
7:30 to 10:00 P.M.--The Chaplain and his
wife will be at home to students in their
home at 702 Tappan Street.
Friday, 4:00-6:00 P.M.-Open House Tea,
Canterbury House.

11

10:45 A.M.-Public Worship. Dr. Parr's ser-
mon will be on the theme "Mirrors or
Windows?"
4:30 P.M.-Student Guild picnic and vespers
at Riverside Park.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
9:40 A.M.--Breakfast, followed by Bible
Study Hoar at 10:00.
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship, with celebra-
tion of Holy Communion. Sermon by the
pastor, ".The Old in the New Revealed."
5:30 P.M.-Supper meeting of Gamma Delta,
Lutheran Student Club, with talk by Mr.
Carl Waldschmidt on "J. S. Bach-Chris-
tian Churchman."
MEMOR IAL CH RIST IAN CH URCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to Congregation
Mr. Howard Farrar, Choir Director
10:50 A.M.-Morning Worship. Nuirsery for
children during the service.
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Assistant in Student Work.
4:30 P.M.-Guild Sunday Evening Hour. The
group leaves the Guild House at 4:30'for
a softball game, picnic supper and vesper
service at Riverside Park. Inrcase of rain
the group will meet in the Memorial Chris-
tian Church.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCI ENT IST

Michigan League Ballroom
Reading Room, 211 East Washington
10:30 A.M.-Sunday Lesson Sermon. Subject:
Christian Science.
11:45 A.M.-Sunday School.
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday evening testimonial
meeting.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
For National Lutheran Council Students
1304 Hill Street
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
8:30- 9:00 A.M. Breakfast at the Center.
9:10-10:30 A.M. Bible Study Hour at the
Center
10:30 A.M. Worship Services in Zion and
Trinity Churches
5:30 P.M. L.S.A. Meeting in Zion Lutheran
Parish Hall, 309 E. Washington St. Pro-
gram following supper-Dean James Ed-
omonson of the School of Education will
speak on "Future Outlook of Education."
Tuesdays and Fridays-
7:30-7:50 A.M. Morning Devotion at the
Center.
Wednesday-
4:00-5:30 P.M. Tea and Coffee Hour at the
Center
STUDENTS EVANGELICAL CHAPEL

II.

11

,,

YOU ARE INVITED TO
DANCE at the DEN

II

I

SATURDAY NITE
9 P.M. till Midnite

NO COVER CHARGE
NO MINIMUM

."Laest Juke Box Music with

Meeting at Lane Hall,
Corner, State and Washington
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Minister

,

I I

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