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June 25, 1948 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-06-25

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, JUNE 25, 1948

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Louis-Walcott

Battle

Postponed;

Set

For

Tonig

Major League Round-UUp

DETROIT, June 24-(i._-After
five straight losses, the Detroit
Tigers got a break today-from
the weather.
Rain fell on Briggs Stadiurn and
forced postponemncnt of a sched-
uled game with the Washington
Senators.
The rest was a welcome one to
' the hard-pressed Detroit team
that had just lost a series to the
weak-hitting Senators and now
faced the tough New York Yank-
ees for three days.
Manager Steve O'eill was ex-
pected to throw either his ace
Harold Newhouser or right hander
Virgil Trucks against the Yanks
in the first of the games Friday.
Newhouser, after a seven-game
winning streak, was beaten his
last time out by the Boston Red
Sox.
* * *
NEW YORK, June 24-(. )-
Allowing only four hits, Ralph.
Hainner costed to his second
victory of the season today as
the Chicago Cubs collected 12
including homers by Ilamner
s and Bill Nicholson to crush the
New York Giants, 11-2 in the
second game of a doubleheader.
The Giants won the first game,
3-2, scoring all of their runs in
r, the first inning.
CHICAGO, June 24-(/P)-Ted
Williams hit his 14th and 15th
home runs of the season to- pace
Boston to a 8-5 victory over the
Chicago White Sox in the second
game of a double-header before
8,700 persons here today. Thc
White Sox won the first game,
3-1, to end a Red Sox six game
winning streak.
In the second game Boston ov-
ercame a 5-1 Chicago lead to gain
a 2-1 series edge.
BROOKLYN, June 24-()--
Jackie Robinson went on a bat-
ting rampage today, hanging
out seven hits including six in a
rowti t spark the Brooklyn
Dodgers to 6-2 and 8-6 triumphs
c v@er the Pittsburgh Pirates.
WELCOME
STUDENTS!!
The "Personality" or "Crew
Cut" is distinctly for Michi-
gan Mlen ...
7 Barbers -No Waiting
r Hrs.: 8:30 A.M. to 5:30P.M.
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Between Mtate nd Mich. Theatre

The second game was called af-
ter the top of the eighth inning
because of darkness.
Robinson won the first game
when he homered with the bas-
es l'oaded and two were out in
the ninth inning. In the sec-
ond, Robinson pounded out two
doubles and two singles in as
many trips to the plate and
drove in two runs and scarred
three.
Rookie Bob Chesnes had a
-0\ shutout going into the
eighh inning of the opener.
In the nightcap, Rex Barney
held the Pirates hitless for six
innings but the Pirates drove
him from the mound in the
seventh.
* *
CLEAVEI)D. June 24-GP) Vie
Raschi shut out the Cleveland
Indians, 4-0 today with home runs
by George McQuinn, Johnny Lini-
dell and Joe DiMaggio accounting
for all of the New York Yankee
runs.
Rasehi allowed the Indiansr six
Iti;s in gaining his ninth straight
victory of the season. He has lost
only once.
The triumph sliced the first
place margin of the Indians to a
game-and-a-half over the run-
ner-up Yankees.
Bob Feller went the route for
the indians and was charged with
his eighth setback. Feller yielded
only five safeties, fonned eight
and walked two.
The victory enabled the Yanks
to take the four game series from
the Indians, three games to one.
Co-Rec P rogram
Tonight in the Intra-Mural
spotlight will find the first co-rec-
reational program of the summer
session under way at the Sports
Building.
Each Friday night during the
session this activity will take
place. All the facilities of the
Sports Building will be at the dis-
posal of those desiring to take ad-
vantage of the opportunity. The
building will be open from 7 until
9:30 p.m.
The program is restricted to stu-
dents, faculty members and their
female guests. It will be necessary
to show receipts for the summer
session to gain admittance.
MAJOR LEAGUE LEADERS
1y The Associated Press.
jPlayerand Club G. AB. H. Pet.
Williams, Red Sox 56 206 86 .417
*Musial, Cards ....58 226 91 .403
Boudreau, Indians 56 210 78 .371

New York Hit by Deinge;
Odds Continue to Drop
Second tanve]lalioii Dim', Iope of IHjljon
Dollar Gate; Rivaks Lo Weigh-mii Again Today
YANKEE STAIUM, New York, June 24-P-)(-The scheduled
heavyweight title fight between Jersey Joe Walcott and Joe Louis was
postponed tonight for the second time because of rain.
The bout was immediately re-set for tomorrow night at 8 o'clock
(CST),
A downpour struck the stadium shortly before preliminaries
were scheduled to start. Water poured through the ringside area.
At 7 o'clock no one was near the ring.'

I

Yesterday's Results .
New York 4, Cleveland 0.
Chicago 3-5, Boston 1-8.
Washington at Detroit, post-
poned, rain.
Philadelphia atf St. Louis, Inc.
A MERICAN L EAGUE

Major Lea g

1

W. L.
Cleveland .....35 21
New York .....35 24
*Vlijladelphjia ..35 26
Boston -.-..... 29 37
Dletroit ....... 28 30
Washington ... 27 32
"St. Louis ..... 22 34
Chicago ...... ,18 35
*Playing night games.-

Pet.
.625
.593
.574
.518
.483
.458
.393
.340

(i.B.
1t%
6
/
912
13
151 2

The bout was originally set for
last night.
The ,weather forecast for to-
morrow is for "late afternoon or
evening thundershowers." The
20th Century Sporting Club, pro-
moters of the bout, have the use
of the Stadium through Monday
night.
Both fighters had arrived at
the ball park.
Louis came about 5 p.m. and
waited in an automobile outside
the Stadium.
"11ow they gonna have a
fight," he asked as he watched
the storm'
Walcott and his party arrived
shortly before 6 p.m. and went
immediately to the dressing rooms'
Only about 1,000 person were in
seats in the uncovered areas of
the Stadium. Another 10,000 were
huddled in the covered stands.
The streets outside the park
were jammed with thoroughly
soaked persons.
Some 10,400l unreserved seats
had gone on sale at 4 o'clock. A
crowd of 55,000 was expected.
Louis had come to the stadium
direct from his Pompton Lakes,
N.J., training quarters. He had
returned there yesterday when the
first postponement was an-
nounced shortly after noon.
Walcott had remained in New
York.
New York boxing rules require
another weigh-in tomorrow be-
cause of the 48-hour postpone-
ment from the original date,
However, if both managers
agree, the weigh-in can be
passed up with, approval of the
boxing commission.
Louis scaled 213 I pounds,
heaviest of his career, when the
two men weighed yesterday. Wal-
cott checked in at 194 %.
The champion took the second
delay in stride.
"I don't think it will bother
me any more than it does him,"
he declared. "It's fair for both
of us."
Louis said he would return im-
mediately to his New Jersey camp.

IHe plans a light workout tomor-
row morning before returning to
the city.
He wore a raincoat and straw
hat as he pushed gently through
the crowd surrounding him out-
side the Stadium.
Only twice before has the
champion had a figiht post-
poned. His first bout with Max
Schmneling was delayed and Joe
was knocked out in the 12th
round. Neither man held the
title at the time. uist first fight
after hecoming champion, with
Tommy Far', was set back four
days. Farr went the route with
Louis.
Walcott said he planned to re-
main in New York City.
Felix Bocchicchio, his sponsor,
said he didn't think the challenger
would be affected by the delay,

Today's Ganes
Phibadelphia at Chicago--
(riight)-McCahan (0-2) vs,
Gettel (1-2).
Boston at St. Louis- (night)
-=Parnell (3-4) vs. Stephens (1-
4),
New York at Detroit-(night)
.-.i..Embree (5-1) vs. Newhouser
(8-5) or Trucks (4-4).
Washington at Cleveland-
(night)-Wynn (6-7) vs. Lemon
(10-5).
The deadline for softball en-
tries has been set at 4 p.m. to-
day. Managers of teams or in-
dividuals interested in joining
the program may phone their
entries in to the Sports Build-
ing office.

e Sandings
reste rday's esis
Chicago 2-11, New York .3-2.
Prooklyn 6-8, Pittsburgh 2-fi.
Cincinnati at Philadelphia,
postponed, rain.
St. Louis at roston, inc.
N A'I0N Ai L FA G IF
'n T 1 I~t . L. Pet. (i.B.
t . 4 24 .586 ...
' t, Lis ....,. : 25 .561 . '
l'iteburgh ..,. , 2#26.552 2
New York.....30 27 .526 32
Broolyn ......26 29 .73 61
P'hiladelpahia . ... 8 32 .46f7 7
Cincinnati ,. ... 26 35 .42 6 1) M
C hicago .,... ,24 34 .414 10
TPlaying night games.
Today's Giames
Pittsburgh at Boston-(11iglft)
-..Ostermueller (3-1) vs. Bick-
ford (4-2).
St. Louis at Brooklyn-(night)
--Hearn (4-2) or Munger (3-i6)
vs. Braca (8-d5).
Cincinnati at New York--_
Vandermeer (3-7) vs. Poat (5-
}).
Chicago at Philadelphia. -
(night) - porowy (2-1) vs.
Leonard (5-5)
Babe-Moves
CHICAGO, June 24---(/P)-A
dark horse and three former
champions-headed by Babe Did-
rikson Zaharias- -today climbed
into the semi-finals of the wo-
men's Western Open Golf T1Iour-
nament,
Mrs. Zaharias, entered from
Grossingers Country Club, N.Y.,
was a 3 and 2 quarter--final vic-
tor over highly-regarded Polly
Riley of F t. Worth, Tex.
The Babe tomorrow meets Hel-
en Dettweiler of Indio, Calif.. 1939
Open Champion. She rallied for a
1 up quarter-final decision over
Mary Agnes Wall of Menominee,
Mich.
Inl the lower bracket,, Patty
Berg, 194k1-43 clamxrpion fz~rm
Minneapolis, won as expected
from Claire Do ran of Lakewood,
Ohio, 3 and 2.
Beverly Hanson oi Fargo, NDy.,
provided the day's only excite-
ment. Tall and be-spec tacled, she
walked away from Grace Lenzyk
of Newington, Conn., 1948 Nation-
al Collegiate Women's Champion,
9 and 7.
Miss Hanson. who faces Miss
Berg tomorrow, sailed around the
nine-hole turn seven holes in
front. Miss Lenczyk, whose driver
was treacherous throughout the
match, conceded three of the 11
holes played.

llighligishts of Dewey Witi;
Convention Clamor, Drama

C( N VENTION TI Al Philadel-
I hia, June 24-(/P)----They called
off both fights tonight.
In New York, rain washed out
the heavyweight fight, between Joe
Louis and Jersey Joe Walcott.
Hvere inPhiladelphia. a cloud-
burst hit this town just as the
night session of the national Re-
publican convention started.
At the same time a Dewey tor-
rent, steadily gathering momnen-
turn all day, really carne down to
drown the chances of all other
candidates.
* * *
The dramatic highlight of this
dzraatic night came when Harold
~J Stassen strode forward. He has
been a favorite w iththe gallery
lere, so the cheering was tremen-
dons.
"With your permission," said
the bulky, one-time governor of
Minnesota, "I would like to see-
ojid the nomination that the
Ilonorable Thomas E. Dewey b
the unanimous choice of this
convention."
Cries of "No, No!" from the
spectators stopped him here. Dur-
ing the outburst Stassen licked his
lips, waited for the noise to sub-
side. When it faded, he finished
the sentence, "for the presidency
of the United States."
As Stassen said those words,
"President of the United
States," the job for which he
had worked so long, no one knew
what was in his mind. But he
smiled and waved as he left the
platform.
Because the rules demanded
it, the roll was called. And as the
delegation from California was be-

ing polled, outside a brilliant
double rainbow came out after the
storm.
The n iglht session was a decided
contrast to the one held in the af-
ternoon. Then the men who are
supposed to pull strings bustled
busily around string pulling.
Senator Joe McCarthy of Wis-
consin, so wet with perspiration
that his shirt sticks to his back,
shoves his way through the crowd.
He's a handy man at using his el-
bows.
Up on the stage Harold Stas-
sen sits with his wife and his
scorecard. Keeping track of the
votes, pausing now and then for
a, brief check with one of his
lieutenants.
it's excessively hot, steaming
hot. Even the flags seem to droop
in the humid heat.
Yet in spite of atrocious working
conditions, the worrying, the scur-
rying, the conferences go on.
* * *
So far as could be seen from
the press table, only one person in
this hall of 14,000 viewed the pro-
ceedings casually.
And that exception, surprisingly,
was a presidential candidate.
Chairman Joe Martin of Mas-
sachusetts, presiding over his third
national Republican convention,
was completely tuckered out. He
lost sleep during the all-night ses-
sions in the House last week. He
lost sleep when he got here. He
lost more sleep when the conven-
tion didn't go home until 2:02
a.m., CST, this morning.
So Martin sat in his chair, and
nodded.
hI

+ Classified Adverlisiug +

--- __--

WANTED To BUY
WANTED:-Tuxedo, size 42 long. In
good condition. Ph. Ypsi, 1450J4. ;35
FOR SALE -
1947 SERVI-CYCLE. used very little.
$195. 207 Miller Ave. )36
TYPEWRITERS-12 and 14 inch car-
riage. Good condition Call 2-7490 at.
ter 5:30 p.m. )22
ALIJ1INUMWARE, dishe:s, rugs, ma-
hogany bedroom suite, living room
furniture. Phone 2-1512. )25
HYDROPLANE 135 cu. in. New V8-60
engine. Mahogany hull. Will do over
50 miles per hour. 341 Cooley House,
East Quad. Phone 2-4591. )26
MAN'S ENGLISH BIKE: Three speed,
hand brakes. Call 6681. )28
OR SALE: Girl's English bicycle ---
Almost new. Selling at bargain price.
Inquire of R. O. Smith, Lane Hall.
)29
NEW COIEMAN oil space heater. Cost
$92, sale price $45. Oil drums includ-
ed. Owner moving noon June 25th.
Phone 3574W11, Ypsi. 1577 Spring-
field. Willow Run. )33
TEE Of' with a neW set of golf clubs.
Ladies' and men's. Call 2-7053.
)2
B AY BIJGGY; maple dressing table
and stool; davenport and chair;
dishes; electric iron: wood clarinet;
tuxedo, topcoat. brown suit, size 36:
ladies' shoes 6%AAAA; Ph. 2-2035.
)3
GAS STOVE 4-burner, A & B, $40.
Washing machine, Universal, with
many new parts. $65. Walnut-fin-
ished bed, springs and inner-spring
mattress. $15. Combination bottle-gas
and coal and wood table-top model
stove, practically new. $125. Every-
thing in good condition. Call 2-9020.
MAN'S BICYCLE, Egglish made with
hand brakes, basket, kIck-up stand,
chain guard and lock. Price $45.00.
Phone 27684 evenings.
)4
CHEVROLET, 1937 master coupe. Radio,
heater, Motor and steering ge-ar re-
cently overhauled. Nearly new bat-
tery, $345. 1359 Rosewood.
8
ROLLEICORD camera, new model, ex-
cellent condition. Leather case. $125.
Call Don Nuechterlein 2-3803.
)7
LEATHER FRATERNITY living room
furniture in fair and good condition.,
Cabinets, chairs, tables, couches.
Open to dealers and private parties.
Best offer takes. 715 Hill street after-
noons and evenings. Phone 4187.

ROOM AND BOARD
BOARDERS WANTED. Two or three
meals a day, Monday through Friday.
715 Hill Street. Call 4187.
)17
_ _ _ _____
H ELP WANTED
STUDENT for part-timxe work at soda
fountain. Swift's Drug Store. 340 S
State St. Phone 2-0534. )23
WANTED: Coed for counter and foun-
t:ain work. Morning hours. Phone
5464. )10
MISCELLANEOUS
S'IUDEN'PS desiring tutoring in
French. Japanese, Latin or Greek--
Please contact Reynold L. Burrows,
215 Prescott House, East Quad. 2-4591.
)21

ate Scores
IPhiladelphia . ..........10
tt. Louis .... .. .. . . 3

6
5

ROYAL PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
i N STOCK
L',oreign Language Keyboards
Also Available
GUA RANTEED
REPAIR WORK
RENTAL TYPEWRITERS
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
SERVICE CO.
111 Vi. Fourth Ph. 2-1213

2
0

LOST: All white puppy, small
vicinity of campus Tuesday. No
tification. Reward. Call 6630.

DRUGS
BEER
WI N ES

male.
iden-
)27

COMING

NET WEEK

Ia

ROYAL No. 2 iron, University Golf
Course. June 16. Reward. Call 2-6292.
)14
~__ PERSONAL
YOUNG WOMAN working for master'8
in mathematics desires help from in-
telligent man in mathematic 103s
a nd 112s,(Call Jeanz 9764. )30
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS for men students New furni-
ture. Innerspring mattresses 437
Hamilton Pl. Close to campus. Phone
5068. - ) 20
CLOSE TO CAMPUS, can accommodate
graduate students or teachers for
summer and fall terms. Furnished
suites and part of double room avail-
able now. Plenty of hot water. show-
er, etc. Reasonable Call 509 S. Divi-
sion St. near Jefferson
)19
APARTMENT available until Septem-
ber 15. Completely furnlshed, from
automatic toaster to friendly neigh-
bors 924 Lynn Court, Willow Run
Village. )18
6-ROOM APARTMENT with private
entrance needs 1 male graduate stu-
dent for summer. 1 block from cam-
pus. Tel. 29130.
)15
HOUSING for trailer family. Inquire
telephone 2-1489. )34
UNUSUALLY lovely double room for a
married couple, two men, or two
women. Close to campus Phone 4546,
)32
DOUBLE ROOM available for summer
and fall. Phone 2-0545. 335 E. Jeffer-
sonl St. )31

I

Breakfast at

Witams
corner South University
and Forest Ave.
7:30"A*M

fv~~h UIIN
announces

S.D.D. for Mich. State
Liquor Control Comm.

SJUMMER1/l

FOR THE SU MER SESSION
ARE AVAILABLE NOV /
Bring cashier's receipt to
th"le U n ion ma in desk.
The following departnents are
open for your convenience:

D IRECTOR

t

e

C '

Featufing Names, Phone Numnbers,
Home Addresses at the Lowest PriCe

n Years.

SPE CIAL S
through Saturday
y WOOL SLACKS 500
(Army Weave)
WHiTE T-SHIRTS 2 fo
(First Quality)

SWIMMING

* Swimming Pool
* Billiard Room

n
a ti 1 _
,
:
. -
.
'-y ? y
i

* Soda Bar
* Cafeteria

Ill' U El

. Main Dining Room

i

'

®i

i i

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