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June 25, 1948 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1948-06-25

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Al
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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JTJNE25. 1948

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OLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Texas Officials Seek Millionaire 'Angel'

Sidelights of GOP Convention

Officials of the University of
Texas are looking for a million
dollar "angel."
That is the amount of the gift
they will need to set up the second
largest numerical analysis labora-
tory in the nation, which they
hope to establish in all former
magnesium plan off campus, ac-
cording to the Summer Texan.
The plant, which is now under'
lease to the university, will be pur-
chased from the War Assets Ad-
ministration at a 100 per cent dis-
count, officials hope.

Students at the University of
Illinois will have an opportunity
to purchase "patronage cards" in
the fall, according to the Daily
Illini.
The cards will allow their hold-
ers 10 to 15 per cent reductions in
prices at many campus establish-
ments, principally barber shops,
shoe repair, laundries and dry
cleaning stores.
Money from the sale of the
cards will be used for free recrea-
tion and entertainment functions
and to organize an intramural
M NCIOIIGAN
NOW SHOWING

Only at Lyon & Healy can
you find such a wealth of
material on every phase of
Sheet Music and Musical
Literature . . . books and
folios for beginner, advan-
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catalogues of all leading
publishers. . . music for ev-
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-in arrangement or en-
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musical subject.

CHORAL
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Shows Continuous from 1 P.M.

BEER
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BEE R MIXERS WINE
CHAMPAGNE & SNACKS
CONVENIENT DRIVE-THRU SERVICE
Daily: 10A.M.-10 P.M. Sunday: Noon-7 P.M.
NO PARKING PROBLEMS
114 East Williams Call 7191
he

athletic equipment loan system
which can equip full teams for
tournaments and other events.
* * *
The Stanford Daily recently
won a vote of confidence from the
students of Stanford University.
Nine out of ten Redskin students
read the collegiate paper regularly
whereas the best of the near-by
San Francisco papers could man-
age only five out of ten, according
to a poll taken by the Stanford
chapter of Alpha Delta Sigma, na-
tional honorary advertising fra-
ternity.
* * *
Sunbathing on all University of
Illinois property outside the pri-
mary instruction area was author-
ized recently.
"Students will be permitted to
sunbathe in University property
so long as established codes of
moral conduct and decency in
dress are observed," according to
the Illini Dean of Men's state-
ment.
"The administration believes
the majority of students will re-
spect and assist in maintaining
theo University's standards of
good conduct and decency," he
commented.
Conn Reports
New Studies
f8 Diabetes
Diabetes has been produced in
normal people by injecting gland
extract into their muscles, ac-
coring to Prof. Jerome W. Conn
of the Medical School.
Up to now, artificial diabetes
could be produced only by a direct
attack upon theipancreas, but
studies made here suggest that
injunctions of pituitary material
produce temporary diabetes in
healthy people by upsetting the
normal balance of uric acid.
Dr. Conn reported to the Ameri-
can Diabetes Association in Chi-
cago last Sunday that the state of
diabetes lasted as long as the
gland extract was injected, usually
from eight to ten days, and added
that most probably permanent di-
abetes can be produced by the in-
jection method in some people.
Dr. Conn pointed out that in-
sulin is only a treatment, but "all
hope for prevention of this dis-
ease, or its possible cure, is de-
pendent upon discovery of the ab-
normalities which initiate the di-
abetic state."
usiness iNow
Takes Genius,,
Drake Asserts
Today's small businessman must
be "almost a genius," according to
Milton J. Drake, Detroit Bank
vice-president who spoke on cam-
pus ,yesterday.
Addressing members of a Con-
ference on Small Business, spon-
sored by the School of Business
Administration, Drake listed keen
competition increasing specializa -
tion and complexity as causes for
the modern businessman's di-
lemma. Risks and problems of
small business, which comprises 90
per cent of American business, are
constantly increasing, he added.
Banks are eager to see small
business prosper, but in making
loans their first consideration
must always be the safety of the
depositor's funds, Drake explained.
"The bank requires that the
borrower have experience i busi-

ness because banks know that new
businesses run by men with limit-
ed experience involve high risks."
Drake cited the high mortality
rate of small business ventures.
"Gone is the day when a man
could start in business with a few
dollars and hope for easy success,"
he said.
'roduRihn---a-le
CHICAGO, June 24--(P)--Pro-
duction of the new Tucker car will
be halted for two weeks, effective
Friday, president Preston Tucker
said today.

Phoenix Group Emphasizes
Second Phase of Memorial

Q#

work.
To

(Continued from Page 1)
Taking cognizance of the possi-
bility that international control of
atomic energy might succeed, the
committee stressed that its impact
on the American way of life may
be event more drastic."
'An outside agency can then de-
termine the amount and kind of
atomic power development and
atomic research the United States
can carry on, and can inspect and
police atomic research and power
installations.
Studies Essential
"In either situation, it would
seem that studies in all branches
of the social sciences, psychology,
and the humanities on these im-
pressions on national life are es-
sential," the committee said.
The report emphasized that the
project should not duplicate or
overlap the activities of existing
units of the University, but sup-
plement and strengthen them.
Talent of the highest order,,4t is
hoped, will be drawn into the

further this end, the com-

A Cool Place To Dine on Fine Food!
LA N TE RN GA RDE N
American and Chinese Dishes
AIR-CONDITIONED
Quick Service - Plate Luncheons
CHOP SUEY - CHOW MEIN TO TAKE OUT
Reasonable Prices

DEFEATED HOPEFULS-Sen.
Robert A. Taft, right, and ex-
governor Harold A. Stassen
threw their delegations to Dew-
ey shortly before the third bal-
lot.

GUILD
NEWS
Teh MCF will meet at 4:30 p.m.
Sunday, in the Lane Hall base-
ment, for the first lecture of a
weekly series.
Rev. H. J. Devries, of the Grace
Bible church in Ann Arbor, will
be the first speaker. Refreshments
will be served.
MCF also invites all students to
attend the weekly Wednesday
Night Bible Study, in the "Upper
Room" of Lane Hall, a get-ac-
quainted picnic to be held at 7
p.m. tomorrow leaving from Lane
Hall.
* * *
The final open forum of the
Religious Education Workshop
will be held today from 2 to 4
p.m. in Lane Hall, with Rabbi
Morris Adler of Detroit as speaker.
Dr. Edward W. Blakeman, Uni-
versity consultant in religious ed-
ucation, is the worshop director.
Dr. Blakeman said that the an-
nual Workshops at the University
are unique in their approach to
religious education. The Workshop
considers religion to be learned
rather than revealed, and is try-
ing to get churches to use the
same teaching techniques as the
public schools.
The weekly Friday night party
'will meet at 8 plml today at the
Guild House and will attend a
softball game with Zion Lutheran
Church.
Refreshments will be served.
There will be a Guild meeting
at 6 p.m. Sunday; supper will be
followed by a program, at which
Rev. Eugene Zendt of Memorial
Christian Church will speak on
"The Christian and the Univer-
sity."
Mrs. Vandenberg Joins
Red CrOSS Directors
SAN FRANCISCO, June 24-(OP)
--Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg's
wife was named to the American
Red Cross National Board of Di-
rectors today.
The selections were announced
during the Red Cross National
Convention.

mittee recommended that the
Project should support pre-doc-
toral and post-doctoral fellows
and research professors who will
devote themselves to all phases of
the work.
Administrative Aspect
The report also revealed that
more study is necessary to round
out the details of the administra-
tive organization of the Phoenix
Project, but it is planned to be a
'truly democratic structure" with
student representation and possi-
bly alumni representation also.
Speaking of the first phase of
the Project-research in the bio-
logical and physical sciences -
the committee saw radioactive iso-
topes in the main role.
Commission Controls
Isotopes are under control of
the Atomic Energy Commission
and furnished by their laborator-
ies.
Slated for study are the effects
of radiation on living plant and
animal tissue and the use of iso-
topes in metallurgy and chemical
combination processes.
It is anticipated that the Michi-
gan student body will raise the
bulk of the funds necessary to en-
sure the success of the project,
Dewey's Mother
Expresses Pride
OWOSSO, Mich., June 24-(P)-
About the only excited person in
this small industrial city tonight
was Mrs. Anne Thomas Dewey,
69-year-old mother of the Repub-
lican presidential nominee.
To the other 18,000 residents,
Thomas E. Dewey's eminence as a
political figure was getting to be
pretty much of an old story.
This does not, however, diminish
Owosso's pride in the man who
was born on a cold March evening
in 1902.
Most residents, who knew Dewey
as a boy soloist in the Episcopal
Church choir and as a paper boy
here, were confident that he would
be the next president.
Owosso's pride is best exempli-
fied by its fury at Gov. Kim Sigler
and the Michigan delegation for
withholding their support from
Dewey until the third ballot.
"That Sigler almost cost us a
good president," growled a bar-
keep.
The little white frame house
where Mrs. Dewey lives and where
Tom Dewey spent his boyhood
showed no outward appearance of
being any different from the
thousands of similar modest
homes in towns all over America.
Hospital Problems
Will Be Discussed
Problems common to university
hospitals will be discussed on cam-
pus today and tomorrow at a
meeting of 25 executives and de-
partment heads of eight university
hospitals in this country.
University hospitals to be repre-
sented are Iowa, Minnesota, Chi-
cago, Cleveland, Wisconsin, In-
diana, Rochester, and the Univer-
sity.
Waldo W. Buss, assistant direc-
tor of the University hospital, said
that the delegates will also tour
the new Food Service Building.
The meetings will begin at 9
a.m. in the Union.

FAVORITE SON-Sen. Arthur
IT. Vandenberg joins the ranks
of Dewey well-wishers as the
New York g overnor captures the
Republican Party presidential
nomination.
Pre-Bahling
(Continued from Page 1)
broke up with Dewey just 35 votes
short of victory. Two stormy cau-
cuses were held before the final
Michigan decision was made.
As the convention settled down
to nominating the Vice President
an air of jubilation hung over
mammouth Convention Hall be-
cause Republicans believe that
they have not only nominated a
candidate, they have nominated
the next President.
Weary but still active the dele-
gates went into their 12th hour of
deliberation in 24 hours.
Helium filled balloons and bleary
eyes linger on as souvenirs of last
night's seven-hour slam bang
nomination marathon. The bal-
loons, loosed by the successive
stampedes of Taft and Stassen
supporters blanket the ceiling of
Convention Hall and attendants
are combing the city for BB guns
to try and clean them out.
The bleary eyes are lodged deep
in the faces of dog tired delegates
and according to a nurse on the
emergency hospital corps in the
basement of Convention Hall
nothing will eliminate them ex-
cept a long vacation from hectic
politics and some sound sleep.
If noise meant nomination,
Harold Stassen would be on the
ballot in November with Taft a
close second and Dewey a decided
third. Stassen supporters un-
leashed, besides the balloons,
horns, noisemakers, a. brilliantly
dressedIndian chief, a dazzling
blonde in a canoe and even a
drum majorette with the usual
abbreviated skirt who strutted on
top of the speakers rostrum.
To the thundering strains of
Hail to the Victors Michigan's
greatest alumni appeared on the
platform of Convention Hall to
receive a mammoth ovation.
The most bewildered man in
town is Pyaru, the Mahout for the
450 pound baby elephant bought
by Taft men. Fesh from India,
Pyaru can't figure out what all
the noise, yelling and crazy goings
on are about. The thing that
really stopped him was the sight
of a man industriously paddling
a canoe across the lobby of the
Stratford. The sign on the canoe
said "Man the oars and ride the
crest; Harold Stassen has the
best." Pyaru told reporters he's
going to have trouble making the
folks back home believe that one.
The smart promoter who sta-
tioned a gal in an angel's costume
complete with wings outside the
Stratford to hand out tickets to
a new hamburger heaven got so
much publicity he's added an-
other angel and has promised to
hire Gabriel himself if business
keeps on growing.
To the outsider, Philadelphia
might appear to be a city full of
hotshots traveling incognito be-
cause of the number of people
wearing sunglasses Actually the
glasses are protection against the
huge television lights and are be-
coming more popular all the time.
The MacArthur headquarters in
the Adelphia Hotel are probably
the dullest of any candidate. Gen-
eral Jonathan Wainright, Mac-
Arthur's manager, staged second
"Bataan" for "Fighting Doug"
but even most newspapermen
attend his press conferences
more out of respect for Wain-
thurright than any idea that Mac-
Arthur will win. Most of the free
MacArthur literature consists of
reprints from Hearst newspapers.

Wildest item was a song entitled
"God Bless President MacArthur"
Published by the "Home Sweet
Home Publishing Company."

TODAY - SATURDAY!
Feature Starts
1 :00-3:36-6:16-8:56 P.M.

Continuous
from 1P.M.

COOL

I

((oriLhiued frorr Page 1
To many veteran newspaper-
men, a Dewey "press conference"
is more "show" than press con-
ference. One reason for this is a
sizeable group of New York re-
porters who like the governor and,
more selfishly, hope to follow him
to Washington. They ease him
over the rough spots in his duels
with persistent questioners.
A kindly, but fervent, old lady
was looking for "a little boy with a
Stassen button" the other day in
the Bellevue lobby. She herself is
for Stassen because he "worked
his way through school."
First deelegates to succumb to
the heat in the opening session
and peel off coats were from
Texas.
The Kansans, incidentally, are
easily recognizable because of the
large sunflowers in their lapels,
Shifts and Politics
Several Dewey supporters in the
Iowa delegation hope to start
swinging Stassen boosters on to a
"bandwagon" on the fourth bal-
lot. They will vote for Stassen on
three ballots, then suddenly shift
to Dewey on the fourth.
SHOP AND SAVE AT
MARSHALL'S
CUT-RATE DRUG STORE
DRUGS and COSMETICS
featured at
lowest possible prices
BEER - WINES
CHAMPAGNES
S.D. for Michigan State
Liquor Control Commission

"~Dirty politics"' has thus far
been confined to the lower strat-
egy levels. Several young Dewey
enthusiasts succeeded in swiping
a filing cabinet from Stassen
Headquarters by posing as part of
the "Stassen Staff." The file is
now in Dewey Headquarters.
A man named McBride walked
into Michigan headquarters the
other night, produced evidence
that he was once a candidate for
mayor of Philadelphia, and said
he wanted a ticket to a session of
the Convention so he could "make
an impression." In return he
would "do my darndest for Van-
denberg." He got the ticket,
SALE0
SALE
SALE
Must make room
for new
O SHIPMENTS
Just arrived from India-
A Pony Saddle and a
Regular Saddle
INDIA
A~,rt
SHOP
330 Maynard Street

wy r' MMEa IM=

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Also
LATEST WORLD NEWS

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SUNDAY!

WALLACE
BEERY

"ALIAS A
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Located
613 E. Liberty,
by Michigan Theatre

Phone
6380

Open Every
Day Except
Monday

CLIP THIS OUT
IThe *4t Ciiiepna lfealue
PRESENTS
A Summer Program of First-Run Foreign Films
JUNE 25, 26 - MARIUS (French)
"Ranks with 'The Baker's Wife' "
JULY 9, 10 - TO LIVE IN PEACE (Italian)
N.Y. Film Critics Award Best Film of Year
JULY 23, 24- FANNY (French)-
Loop"Raimu and Pagnol at their best"

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