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June 25, 1947 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-06-25

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SDAY, JNE 25, 1947

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ichigan Trails Louisiana State by Four Strokes in NC2

AA Go

New Athletic
Post Accepted
By Matthews
Dave Matthews, captain of the
1943 Wolverine track team and an
outstanding miler and half-miler
here, will be the new director of
intramural athletics at Bowling
Green State University starting in
September, it was announced yes-
terday.
Matthews just received his Mas-
ter's in Physical Education from
the University.
* , *
Harris Beeman, captain of the
Michigan State College tennis
team in 1942-43, who also re-
ceived his Master's degree here
recently, has joined the staff at
MSC as an instructor.
Both fellows come from Royal
Oak. Matthews will be waterfront
director at Camp Algonquian at
Burt Lake this summer. He has
served as camp counselor at Camp
Mahngotahsee in Michigan and
directed playground activities at
Royal Oak.
Beeman, while in the Army, won
a GI tournament on the Wimble-
don courts in England. During his
work at the University, he assist-
ed in work in intramural athlet-
ics at the Sports Building.
The Student Directory
Will go on Sale July 9

Lind, Joyce Lead 303-Man Field
At End of Second Day of Tourney

-

By ARCHIE PARSONS
It's Louisiana State University
in the lead, with Michigan, Big
Nine champs, four strokes behind
and tied for fourth as 47 teams
swung into the second qualifying
round of the National Collegiate
Golf Championships on the Uni-
versity course yesterday.
The boys from L.S.U. took
over from the Stanford tnivers-
sity squad which had boasted an
early lead. The Southeners'
four-man team posted a 301 for
18 holes, while the Indians from
the West Coast had a 302. Ohio
State was third with 303, and
Michigan and Duke were tied
for fourth with 304.
Two Southwestern golfers were
tied for medalist honors at the end
of 36 holes, as one-third of the
field finished up their qualifying
rounds late yesterday afternoon.
They were Charles "Bobe" Lind of
the University of Denver, the fav-
orite in this 303-man field, and
Gerald Joyce, a lone entrant from
Southern Methodist University,
tied at 148.
Only two Wolverines finished
their complete 36-hole grind thus
far. They were Ed Schalon with a
153, and Johnny Jenswold, who
filed a 158. Both boys seem to be
good bets to qualify for the match
play for the individual champion-
ship which begins Thursday.
Other Michigan sores at the
end of 18 holes were: ill Court-
right, 75; Pete Elliott and Bill
Ludolph 76; and Dave Barclay,
77. At the rate the Maize and
Blue golfers went for this first
round, all of them stand excel-
lent chances of qualifying for
the match play, since it appears
now that it will take about 157
to step up to the first tee Thurs-
day.
Although on the basis of a six-
man team, Michigan would be
'WorldSeries'
At Kalamazoo
KALAMAZOO, MiciJune 24-
(P)-All is in readiness in this col-
lege city for a welcome to the Uni-
versity of California, and Yale
University baseball teams due to
clash in the first NCAA Colleg-
iate "World Series" here Friday
and Saturday.
California, winner of the West-
ern Regional Championship last
week-end at Denver, was sched-
uled to arrive here shortly before
midnight Tuesday.
Yale, the Eastern champion, will
arrive Tuesday morning from New
Haven, Conn.
Coach Clint Evans of California
has made reservations for his team
to work out Wednesday and
Thursday on Hyames Field, scene
of the championship games. The
Golden Bears are traveling with
a 22-member; party.
Coach Ethan Allen of Yale said
his team will stage a single work-
out Thursday afternoon to pre-
pare for the opening of the two-
out-of-three game championship
series.
Two Ameican League umpires,
Will McKinley and Edwin Hurley,
have been assigned to work the
championship games. Temporary
bleachers have been erected at
Hyames Field to handle a crowd
of 7,000.
Advance ticket sales are being
handled by the Kalamazoo Junior
Chamber of Commerce.

leading the field, the team score
is decided upon the scores of the
lowest four men. Michigan, only
three strokes behind the leader at
the half-way mark, is in a favor-
able position because of the good
scores of all their men in the first
round.
Both Stanford and Louisiana
State were showing the signs of
strain as some of their boys
came in with their second round
scores late last evening. L.S.U.
posted a 152, 153, and 174, while
Stanford had a 152, 153, and 161.
The University course is no
duffer's paradise, as many of the
boys who have been around the
last two days will testify. Par, 72,
has only been matched five times
in almost 400 rounds of golf, and
the first three holes are a night-
mare for most of the golfers. One
boy has the record for the first
hole so far: a neat 11.
Bo Winninger of Oklahoma
A. & 14. and Bob Harris of San
Jose State were the first two
Jim Ferrier
Tops Harbert
For PGA Title
DETROIT, June 24-(1)-Big,
blond James Bennett Elliott (Jim)
Ferrier, who sinks putts even
longer than his name, today won
America's 29th PGA Champion-
ship over Plum Hollow's rolling
fairways.
The Australian-born resident of
San Francisco defeated Melvin
(Chick) Harbert of nearby North-
ville, Mich., 2 and 1, in the 36-hold
title round, to become the first for-
eign-born entrant to win the class-
ic since Tommy Armour, the Sil-
ver Scot, turned the trick in 1930
Finally Comes Through
Ferrier, a gum-chewer who plays
with the speed of a turtoise and
the finesse of a billiard shark, has
made good use of his two tries at
this fixture. Last year he set the
tournament's qualifying record
with 71-63-13.
Chick holed a four-footer on the
first, and a 15-footer on the sec-
ond-each good for a birdie-to go
two up, but the big fellow remain-
ed unruffled. He canned a 20-
footer on the third for a birdie,
and his par on the fourth was good
enough to even the match.
Even at Half-Time
Each had a one-up edge during
the rest of the morning session,
but when they went to lunch they
were all even.
Although the fir sh didn't come
until the 35th hole, the decision
really was reached on the 20th and
21st. On the 208-yard 20th, Ferr-
ier's long iron smacked a specta-
tor, and the ball rolled far down
a hill, into deep grass. His second
barely reached the edge of the
green, but he ran down a 25-foot-
er for his par, while Harbert needed
two putts from 18 feet for his half.
With the apparently-won hole
snatched from his grasp, Harbert
stood by and watched Ferrier cash
in on the picture shot of the clash
on the 442-yard 21st.
For his triumph, Ferrier receiv-
ed $3,500, and runner-up Harbert
collected $1,500. It was the first
major championship for the vic-
tor, although he won the Austral-
ian Amateur four times and the
Down Under Open twice before
coming to America.

golfers to hit 72-both are fresh-t
men. Later in the day, however,
Duke's Fletcher Wall, Jr., posted
the same score. All three go af-
ter their second round scores
today.
The other two 72s came on the
last half of the qualifying jaunt,
Dick Seidel of Notre Dame, after
running up a 14-over-par 86 on
his first round, amazed the gallery
by shaving seven strokes off each
nine on his second time around.
Bob Seyler of Miami got the other
72 for a total of 152 on his 36
holes.
One southpaw golfer found
the course to his liking, post-
ing a 149 for a third place in the
medalist standings. He iseLoddie
Kempa, a sharpshooter from
Oklahoma A. & M. Charlie Coe,
another favorite, who just flew
in after winning the Trans-
Mississippi tournament, got a
75 on his first round and starts
out again today.
Getting back to the Wolverines,
Bill Courtright came within a few
inches of entering that select cir-
cle of those golfers who have
snared a hole-in-one. He just
missed the ace on the short No.
8 hole, but went on to post the
Wolverines' lowest score to date,
75.
Pete Elliott, who was next
with his 76, must have felt quite
happy about the whole thing,
since only a few days ago he had
to play a match with one of his
own teammates to see who
would get in the tournament.
Today's matches will all be sec-
ond-round affairs, starting- at
7:30 a.m. and continuing to dark.
The team championship will be
decided today and the 64 men who
will enter the match play beginn-
ing Thursday will also be posted.

intramural Program Set
For Summer Students
By IRWIN ZTJCKER
In line with Michigan's expanding sports curriculum, the Intra-
mural Department completed extensive plans yesterday for an eight-
week summer intramural program which will encompass individual
and team tournaments and full use of the many facilities available at
the Sports Building.
Howie Leibee, who directed last summer's successful intramural
play, is back at the helm this year. The veteran athletic director, as-
sisted by versatile Ernie McCoy,

PETE ELLIOTT-Michigan ver-
satile athlete who fired a 76 in
Monday's opening round of the
NCAA golf tournament here to
lead the Wolverine attack.
Major League
Roundup
AMERICAN LEAGUE

New York ....
Boston ......
Philadelplia. .
Cleveland ....
Chicago ......
Detroit .......
Washington ..
St. Louis .....

W L
36 24
32 24
29 29
25 26
30 32
27 29
26 30
23 34

Pet.
.610
.571
.500
.490
.484
.482
.464
.404

GB
2.
61
6%
7
7
8
111/

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 12, Philadelphia 3
Chicago 3, Washington 0
NATIONAL LEAGUE

has invited all new students to
partake in the program along with
the "regular customers."
Daily Activities
The Sports Building is open
daily from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. save
Saturday when the doors close at
noon. The swimming pool is avail-
able from 2 to 5:30 p.m. every
day, including Saturday morning.
On Friday evenings, however,
the Sports Building will be open
as late as 9:30 since those nights
will serve as "co-recreational per-
iods"-wives or girl friends are in-
vited for the evening, and they,
too, are permitted use of all ath-
letic facilities..
Varied Program
Individual tournaments which
will be carried on during the sum-
mer session include tennis, golf,
handball, badminton, paddleball,
and squash racquets. There will
be teams in softball, volleyball
and basketball, Leibee further an-
nounced.
All entrants must fill out pink
eligibility cards which are avail-
able at the Sports Building. These
cards must be returned to the In-
tramural Department no later
than June 30.
However, all men who would
like toparticipate in the golf
tournament will be granted July 3
Ruth Returns
To Hospital
NEW YORK, June 24-(R)-
Babe Ruth returned to the hospi-
tal today on the advice of his phy-
sicians for further treatment.
"I felt very tired," he explained.
"I couldn't seem to get any
strength and decided to take
things easy for a few weeks."
The former home run king was
discharged from the hospital two
months ago after being there for
almost three months during which
he underwent aserious neck oper-
ation. He accepted a position as
consultant to the American Legion
Junior Baseball program and had
made a number of public appear-
ances in that connection since
leaving the hospital.

as their deadline. This extension
was made because of the busy use
of the University course which is
now being devoted exclusively to
the National Collegiate g o 1 f
tournament.
No Entry Fee
There is no entry fee for either
individual or team competition.
Winners and runners-up will re-
ceive medals.
Facilities available at the Sports
Building include gymnastics, box-
ing, fencing, wrestling, golf driv-
ing, bag punching, trampoline,
and weight lifting.
Any inquiries on the present in-
tramural program will be answer-
ed by Leibee and McCoy who can
be reached at the Sports Building
(phone 8109).
Bobby Doerr
Moves Ahead,
In Balloting
CHICAGO, June 24-(AP)-Bob-
by Doerr, steady fielding second
baseman with the Boston Red Sox,
may wind up as the people's
choice to start in the keystone spot
in the 14th Annual All-Star game
at Wrigley Field, Chicago, July 8.
Doerr sizzled past Joe Gordon,
Cleveland Indians, in the ballot-
ing by fans, piling up 1325,593 votes
to 317,661 for Gordon. The record
breaking poll, which will end at
midnight Thursday, will decide the
starting lineups of both the Amer-
ican and National League teams.
Final returns, however, probably
will not be compiled until at least
48 hours after the last lineups
have been submitted.
Tight races were being run also
for two other American League
positions. One involved Pat Mul-
lin, Detroit, and Buddy Lewis,
Washington, for right field, and
the other George Kell, Detroit,
and Billy Johnson, New York for
the third base job.
The individual leader still was
Joe DiMaggio of the New York
Yankees, who has polled 496,374.
Enos Slaughter, Cardinals' left
fielder, was second with 483,882.

Otto Reaches
Semi-Finals
In Net Meet
Reaching the semi-finals of ti
mixed doubles division in the Ker
tucky State Open Tennis Tourna
ment, Fred Otto, varsity membe
of the '47 tennis squad faired be
ter than either of his other tw
teammates, Andy Paton, and B:
Mikulich in their initial tourne
of the annual summer tennis ci:
cuit.
Playing with Doris Jensen, O
to dropped out just before the fn
als to Betty James and Bud Hai
6-2, 6-3. In an earlier match Otto
Jensen whipped Mikulich and hi
partner in two easy sets.
Paton Drops Out
Andy Paton teamed with Dor
Popple, also of Des Moines, bu
met Baba Lewis and Earl Coche
fourth seeded, in the quarter-fin
als and were taken, 6-1, 6-1.
In the singles division, Pato
continued his streak of bad draw
by running up against Gardna
Mulloy, fifth ranking player in ti
nation, in the second round an
lost 6-2, 10-8. Paton had set poir
twice in the long second set, bt
Mulloy's greater experience wa
the match for him.
Talbert, Lewis Win
Otto and Mikulich reached ti
round of 16 in singles before 10
ing to Bill Talbert, 6-1, 6-2, an
Morey Lewis, 6-3, 6-4, respective
Talbert, sixth ranking player an
twice a national doubles cham
ion, had a fine win over Frank
Parker in the Southern Cham:
ionship last summer down
Louisville.
Parker and Mulloy were respo
sible for knocking out all thr
local lads in the mens' double
YOUR FAVORITE
rBEE R
WINE
CHAMPAGNES
at
WITHAMS
Corner S. University
and Forest
specially designated
distributor for
Michigan Liquor
Control Commission
"W ITHAMS"
S. University & Forest Ave.

Boston .......
IBrccoklyn .... .
New York ..
Chicago.....
St. Louis.
Cincinnati ..
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh ..

34
33
31
31
30
29
26
22

25
26
25
28
30
32
35
35

.576
.559
.554
.525
.500
.475
.426
.386

1 ,
3
4
6
9
11

Aming Back
In Ann Arbor
Warren Amling, Ohio State's
All-American footballer, is back
in Ann Arbor, but he now wears
a different uniform.
The former Buckeye guard,
who also shown to advantage
on the basketball floor, has be-
come a practicing veterinarian.
He is assistant to Dr. P. L.
Hanawalt, of 2250 W. Liberty
Rd.
Amling wan nearly unani-
mous All-Ame, ican honors for
his fine line play last fall, even
though his team did not rate
anywhere near the top nation-
ally. He was also mentioned on
several all-Big Nine basketball
teams.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 11, Chicago 0"
Boston 9, St. Louis 6
Brooklyn 4, Pittsburgh 2
In the only two games to be
played in the American League
last night, the St. Louis Brownies
slugged out a 12-3 win over the
third place Athletics, and the
Chicago White Sox halted Wash-
ington's Walt Materson's scoreless
inning streak at thirty-four, as
they handed the Senators a 3-0
set-back at the Capitol City.

Over in the senior circuit, the
New York Giant's rookie hurler
Clarence Iott, came up with a two
hitter to down the Chicago Cubs
11-0, while the Brooklyn Dodgers
kept pace by slapping down the
hapless Pirates 4-2. The Cincinnati
Reds checked the Phillies by the
same 4-2 margin, and the leading
Boston Braves cooled off the red-
hot St. Louis Cards to the tune of
9-6.

'DISTINCTLY VAN BOVEN

a~sfo@sed by Favorite

Thursday, Friday,
June 26, 27
8:30 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
Box Office opens 3 P.M.
Wednesday, June 25th
Admission 45c (Tax Incl.)

/,>
<'
";;-

{

Reservations Phone

4121, Ext. 479

IF YOU WRITE WE HAVE IT
HEADQUARTES
for S'WUDENT and OFFICE SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS, and FOUNTAIN PENS

h/

TYPEWRITERS

SCHOOL SUPPLIES
Zipper Notebooks-Spiral Notebooks
Loose Leaf Notebooks, Notebook Fille
Loose Leaf Notebooks
Notebook Fillers-Clipboards
Brief Cases-Card Files-Book Ends
Typewriter Paper
Mimeograph Paper
Pencils-Erasers

RIGHT COMBINATION
OF STYLE AND COMFORT . ..
7 Co-ordinated Right and Left better shoe-
making features developed to assure perfect
conformity to the natural shape of Right and
Left feet.

Office and Portable Models-
ALL MAKES Bought-Sold-Rented
Cleaned-Repaired
Folding Tables, Typewriter Stands
Typewriter Ribbons and Carbon Paper
FOUNTAIN PENS

T N %49

SEERSUCKER SUITS HAVE TAKEN THEIR RIGHTFUL PLACE IN
THE AMERICAN SCENE ... YOU'LL LIKE THEM BECAUSE THEY
ARE SO COOL AND COMFORTABLE. BEST OF ALL, THEY'RE
WASHABLE AND GUARANTEED NOT TO SHRINK, FADE OR

I ffr""n,/

DISCOLOR,

19.50

rE _rt

C..... L ....

11 hoeftter Eversnorp 7 - 1111

Ii

I I

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