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June 25, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-06-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY-

"D SHAY

_ _ _ _._
__ ._ _ _. _ _.. _ _ __- - i _. t -

WR1ThT'ViflA Q3",MaX

'U' Summer Theatre Season;
Will Open with Shaw Play

The play,\which was adapted as
an opera by music critic Deems
Taylor almost immediately after
its publication, has had a few
performances" in its original form
partly because of the elaborate
costumes and ; scenery, and large
cast required for the production.
Windt To Direet Players
Prof. Valentine Windt of the
speech department Will be man-
aging director of the Players as-
sisted 'by Prof. William Halstead
also of the speech department.
Claribel B. Baird, visiting di-
rector from Oklahoma Women's
College will be in charge of the
Millay production.
Costuming of the various plays
will be under the supervision of
Prof. Perneice Prish of Iowa State
University.1
Prof. Oren Parker of Yale Uni-
versity, and Robert Mellencamp
and Jack Bender of the speech de-
partment will direct scenery con-
struction for the productions.
The Student Directory
Will go on Sale July 91

New Foreign
Students Will
Be Honored
International Center
Will Hold Reception
The International Center will
initiate its tenth consecutive year
of service to students of other
countries with a reception at 7:30
p.m. Saturday in Rackham As-
sembly Hall to welcome newly ar-
rived foreign students.
330 students from over 50 na-
tional areas had registered in the
University by Monday afternoon
according to Dr. Esson M. Gale,
director of the Center. He said
that as students from distant
areas arrive the total is expected
to meet last summer's registration
of 441.
According to Dr. Gale the ma-
jority of foreign students are men
whose chief interest is engineer-
ing. Women students generally
concentrate in education, sociol-
ogy and public health.
Weekly teas are held at 4:30
p.m. at the Center to provide an
opportunity for foreign students
to meet American friends and
each other. One feature of the
teas is the French, Russian and
Spanish tables where students
can practice conversation in these
languages.
American movies are shown at
7:30 Friday evenings. "March of
Time" films are used to acquaint
students with the life and cus-
toms of this country.
Special 'activities which have
been planned for the summer in-
clude tours of Detroit and nearby
factories, picnics and hikes. At the
end of the summer a comprehen-
sive bus tour of the United States
is planned for interested students.

I

FUN FOR COEDS:
Courses in Sports Actvities
To Be Offered This Summer

B

The Department of Physical Ed-
ucation for Women will offer a
variety of sports activities to coeds
registered in the University dur-
ing the summer session.
Courses in riding, golf, swim-
ming, tennis, archery, badminton,
Life Saving, and dance will be of-
fered as electives or to satisfy the
freshmen physical education re-
quirements. Registration for the
classes will be held this week, no
late registrations will be allowed.
Classes will begin on Monday.
Students must have a physical
check-up b e f o r e registration.
SUMMER SESSION 1947
Women's Physical Education
Tournament Entry Blank
TENNIS GOLF
ARCHERY BADMINTON
(Encircle only one)
Name .........................
Local Telephone ........ ......
Home Address................
50c Entry Fee
'Self-Bussing'
Stare in Union
Manager Initiates
Cafeteria Clean Up
In an attempt to clean up un-
sanitary conditions in the Union
cafeteria, the Union house commit-
tee has authorized a self-bussing
system which went into effect last
week.
Under the new plan, worked out
by the student-faculty committee,
diners are requested to carry trays
and dishes to marked "pick-up
stands" near each exit when they
are finished eating.
Before the system went into ef-
fect, the large number of diners
and a shortage of help frequently
forced cafeteria employes to leave
tables uncleaned, allowing dirty
dishes and uneaten food to ac-
cumulate, according to Franklin
Kuenzel, Union manager.
Kuenzel emphasized that the
success of the plan will depend
upon the cooperation of cafeteria
diners.
Society Elects
U' Debaters
Election of seven debaters to
Delta Sigma Rho, national hon-
orary Forensic Society, marked
the completion of the current sea-
son in which. the debate group
participated in 50 debates before
20,000 people.
The debaters honored, all jun-
iors, are: William Flaskamp; Rob-
ert Dilts; Archie Carmichael; Sid-
ney Zilber; Clarence Carlson; El-
vira Smolinski, and David Dutcher.
Group Elects Officers
Newly elected officers of Beta
Epsilon chapter of Eta Kappa Nu,
national electrical engineering
honorary society, are Ernest
Harper, president; Bernard Wil-
terdink, vice-president; Walter
Bergner, secretary-treasurer; Le-
land Picket, engineering council
representative.
2h Quarrp,
On State Street at
head of North University

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There are no instructional fees
for these courses.
Concentrated short'courses run-
ning for three weeks will be
taught also. These courses have
been planned especially for wom-
en attending the six-weeks ses-
sion. Tennis, golf, and swimming
will be offered as short courses.
Registration will be held in con-
junction with the longer courses
znd again on July 21.
Tennis and golf clinics will be
held each Friday beginning July
11 and continuing through August
8. The clinics will provide the
student with an opportunity to re-
ceive individual attention in
brushing up their weak points in
these sports. Other clinic hours
may be arranged upon request.
Tournaments in tennis, golf,
archery and badminton will be
open to all women students, facul-
ty and staff in the University. En-
try blanks may be obtained at the
Women's Athletic Building during
this week, matches will begin
Monday. The tournaments will
provide the player with an oppor-
tunity to find opponents of equal
ability and to perfect skills. Pins
will be awarded to winners in ma-
jor contests.
Along the co-educational line,
recreational rallies will be held at
the Women's Athletic Building.
The first rally will be held from
7to 9 p.m. Friday, all students are
invited to attend. Picnic and
play equipment for outings may be
rented for a small fee at the
Women's A t h 1 e t i c Building
throughout the summer.
Staff members included in the
summer program are Dr. Margaret
Bell, Miss Hilda Burr, Miss Cor-
inne Crogen, Miss Frit2ie Gareis,
and Miss Ruth Harris.
I--

Sturtevant Will
Open Linguists
Lecture Series
A lecture on "Language, the
Nervous System of Society" will
be given at 7:30 p.m. today in
Rackham Amphitheatre by Prof.
Edgar Howard Sturtevant, pro-
fessor-emeritus of linguistics at
Yale University.
Prof. Sturtevant's address will
be the first in the summer session
series of public forum lectures and
luncheon conferences being pre-
sented here by authorities in the
field of linguistics.
A lecture on "Visible Speech"
will be given at 8:15 p.m. tomor-
row by J. E. Steinberg and G. E.
Petersen, of the Bell Telephone
Laboratories.
The first luncheon conference
is scheduled for 1 p.m. Tuesday
when Prof. Yuen Ren Chao, of
Harvard University, will discuss
"Interjections and Expressive In-
tonation in Chinese."
The forum lectures, open to the
public, will be given at 7:30 p.m.
each Wednesday and Thursday in
Rackham Amphitheatre.

Someday there will be two moons
over Miami if the hopes of Prof.
Leo Goldberg, of the astronomy
departm'ent, materialize.
Prof.. Goldberg would like to
see an artificial moon, equipped
with apparatus for measuring and
photographing the sun, sent 500
miles above the earth, where it
would remain "possibly forever."
It would be out of the earth's orbit
and beyond the pull of gravit,
Prof. Goldberg explained.
Thesize of this new astronom-
ical wonder would be 200 feet by
30 feet, somewhat smaller than
the old, ;noon. What the moon
would be made of is still an un-
decided, question. "Green cheese
if you like," Prof. Goldberg said.
Information recorded, by the
equipment on the new moon, would

DRIVER to CALIFORNIA
WANTED
New 1947 Air-Conditioned
Lincoln-12 Sedan.. Due to
illness, owner must return
by train. Contact Dr. Aus-
tin, Phi Rho Sigma, 25695,
with references.

ATTENTION
SUMMER STUDENTS
For Food That Satisfies
TRY
MILLERS
BOX LU NCH
and DELICATESSEN
Call 2-7171
We Deliver Anywhere,
Anytime

More Moans Over Miami Ma
Mlaterialize To Measure Siu

I

11

m

..

SUMMER STUDENTS!
]iiVWe're g dou're back
-- and we've your summer clothes.

'- !

be televised to earth to eagerly
awaiting scientists, whose know-
ledge of solar activity wnuld be
greatly increased.
In the event that scientists rno
longer wanted the pseudo-moon
to continue in its old path and
wanted it to return to earth, os-
sibly for repairs, a means would
have to be found to pull it bac.
Revelli Receives
Honorary Degree
Prof. William D. Revelli, direct-
or of the University band was re-
cently awarded an honorary de-
gree of Doctor of Music by the
Chicago Musical College at its
commencement ceremonies at Or-
chestra Hall, Chicago.
TAVERN
CAFETERIA.
LUNCH 11:00-1:30
DINNER 5:00-7:00
0
338 MAYNARD STREET
Opposite the Arcade

WIT HAM'S
DRUGS
Corner S. University
and Forest
...for...
JUST
GOOD
FOD
"Breakfast at 7:30
at WITHAM'S
Continuous
from 1 P.M.CG

.I

I

EEE9!
MMMMMOM!

THE DRESSES-
Cottons from 8.95-
Prints and Crepes-
Linens and Shantungs
from 12.95 to 29.95
Sizes 9-15, 10-44,
1612 to 2412.
SUMMER TOO
TOO....
right over slack
ning dresses, fr
to 25.00

y 1 '.t

f r

6

4m

Last Day
HIGH FLYING
. THRILLS!

e Play
v'-,
PPERS,"y:
S to eve- .D s
omn 12.95. Bo
WEATHER
.y i

lus

-up

3'

I

Starts Thursday

WARM
FINDS.

Jac'obson s
Exciting New
GABARDINE
SLACK SUIT
3.95
Here is the slack suit
you've been asking for .. .
and in rich lucious gabardine.
Rothley's expert needling and
inspired styling . . . all for $8.95
In brown, navy, melon, copen,
pink, lime and aqua. Sizes
10 to 20. Here is quality held
way up and price held way down.

these "Franklin" em-
broidered beauties in
"Cool Breeze" fabric in
lovely pastels and grey
sizes 10 to 20.
6 za tl/i 5 i/on

V.,
4

S
i
:

FASH ION'S'
IN FRONT...
when it's in back of
Junior Guild's potent
2-piecer of fine broad-
cloth.i Its wicked bow
holds taut a cluster of
unpressed pleats to
give you that devinely

devilish look. D
to be your s u
theme song.
25.00
* s

Destined
mm e r

SHOP
'o"nd the corner on State

t

w

I

i

I

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\"
\"
;.:
\
..
1 ::
, \
\.
\

$150

Plus fax

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